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Search tags: Non-Fiction
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review 2018-06-20 21:42
The Regional Office Is Under Attack - a comic book of a novel - great fun
The Regional Office is Under Attack!: A Novel - Manuel G. Gonzales

How to describe this... It's about superheroes while they're "off duty" and a specific group of superheroes -- all women. They're recruited by a place that is a travel agency unless you want to go to Akron Ohio, in which case it's the global HQ for these amazing magic women and the people who organize them.

 

And the book takes place while their HQ is under attack.

 

I can't tell you much more than that without spoiling it. It's humorous without being satire and without mocking superheroes of the more usual sort. Clearly written by someone who loves the heroes we all know and love and also completely different in the angle we watch from. The humor isn't at the expense of our usual heroes, it's just that we're in on their inner-most thoughts - stuff like "this is a f-ing ridiculous way to die" etc.

 

A very fast read because it's easy and I wanted to know how it was going to turn out. It started a tad slow, and we get the back and forth from present to past and back again (a gimmick I'm really starting to see as a novelists easy way out, but it works here.) I feared it would be all origin story, but it's absolutely not. There are very few feelings, and the only adjective is the F word - all of this sounds terrible. Maybe it's just my mood. I have been wanting light lately and this hit the spot. There's no great depth, which is exactly why it works. I've read comic books that felt a bit like this but never a novel. It's different and therefore quite interesting as well as just plain fun. 

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review 2018-06-20 15:45
The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out The Window And Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out The Window And Disappeared - Rod Bradbury,Jonas Jonasson

What a tale!
There were moments throughout where I felt lost in a way. With the story flipping back and forth between then and now, it got a little confusing at times. Still, in the end, it was brilliant and I get it.
This is a story that has to be told the way it is for you to understand who the 100 year old man is, and how he came to climb out of his window. You needed to go back and forth between his life, moments he won't want to forget, and once you read, neither will you. His moments are incredible. That putting it mildly too.
Yup, truly a wonderful story.
Did I like it better than the other book I have read? No, but close.

 

 

Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2018/06/the-100-year-old-man-who-climbed-out.html
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text 2018-06-20 09:52
Reading progress update: I've read 74%. - I've been here before except I REALLY haven't
Illuminae - Jay Kristoff,Amie Kaufman

I'm rationing this book now as I have real life things that I need to do today. So much for, "I' can only take one hour at a time".

 

Right now I'm at a part that ought to be making me yawn. I've seen all the "Resident Evil" movies (now there's a confession). I know all about having a kick-ass heroine shoot her way through rabid used-to-be-people killers in a confined spaces with alarms sounding in the background, red warning lights flashing and severed high-voltage powerlines arcing. 

 

I've so been there,

 

But never like this.

 

Never with a smart brave heroine who cannot bring herself to kill.

 

Never with rabid used-to-be people that I feel deeply sorry for.

 

Never with an understanding that, when this isn't a first-person shooter game but an atrocity in which everyone is the victim, that winning isn't possible because surviving can cost too much.

 

Never with so much damned intensity and not a single line of prose.

 

In my work life, there's a lot of focus on disruption as something that changes the rules in commerce, opening up new opportunities and challenging established ways of working.

 

The structure of this novel is fundamentally disruptive. It's like the leap from "Tristram Shandy" to "Pride and Prejudice" in terms of form. This is the bloom of an almost post-literate generation that has freed itself from linear text and the straight-jacket of grammar that keeps writing on the ground and has taken to swinging through the trees with the confidence of those who've grown up comfortable with Kanji/Emoli/Gif ideography. To an old guy like me, it's astronishing and wonderful.

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review 2018-06-20 03:33
Death of a Cozy Writer by G. M. Malliet (audiobook)
Death of a Cozy Writer: A St. Just Mystery - G.M. Malliet,Davina Porter

Series: A St. Just Mystery #1

 

This was another audiobook that I picked up from the library to have something light to listen to. I wasn't impressed though. It's a modern-day mystery but a lot of the attitudes of the family seem like it would make more sense to be taking place in the 50s or 60s. It's a modern day country house murder, basically.

 

I don't think I'll be reading another one in this series because the inspector had some eyebrow-raising opinions concerning women dressing professionally and the author took so long setting up the family dynamics that we didn't meet the inspector and have the murder investigation until we'd gotten at least a good third into the book. Possibly more, I can't remember exactly.

 

Oh well, it passed the time.

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review 2018-06-20 02:25
Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine -- she really actually is gonna be just fine
Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine - Gail Honeyman
I liked this because I could relate to a lot of parts, but I don't think my star rating should count as a recommendation for just anyone. It's pretty much like a "beach read" - an easy book where everything is obvious, but it got to my heart. I saw every single plot point coming from a mile away, and the only reason I kept reading is I found her charming in the way that something horrible becomes funny ten years after it happens. (This is a coping skill of mine: "Right, life is falling apart, but in ten years, this will make a really funny story." That's sort of how you have to take Eleanor.)

Thanks, Book Club - because I'd not have touched this without you guys outvoting me once again! And I just made the cut-off for actual discussion time too. 

Seriously, this is a decent look at trauma through a non-victim lens. Eleanor Oliphant can be a difficult woman. She's sure she's right about everything, so has no clue why you might be irritated with her lack of tipping, total candor, rudeness, judgmental attitude, etc. It's clear she has some "issues" and the book is basically about how just a little human contact can go a long way toward healing even horrific damage. She really will be completely fine I'd bet.
 
(Yes, of course that's simplistic - that's why it's a beach read and not a psych textbook.)
 
 

 

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