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review 2018-04-03 19:59
The Widow of Wall Street: A Novel - Randy Susan Meyers

Wow, wow, wow!!!

I absolutely loved this book! 

Phoebe was practically a widow when she married Jake, the man she had been attached to since the tender age of 15. It was always about him. Everything. He was never home and even when he was home, he was only physically there.

Phoebe seemed to be just the eye candy that Jake needed to attract his "investors". Allowing her to attend events when it benefited him only. 

How in the heck did Jake get away with all this and for over a decade? What an arse he turned out to be. He was a horrible dad, as well. 

I was mesmerized by this book. The building of Phoebe and Jake's lives together, the construction of Jake's investing empire and the catastrophic failure of his pipe dream.

I wanted so many times to slap some sense into Phoebe, especially at the end of the book. So many times I screamed "why" at her. Of course, she didn't hear me. Ha!! 

All of my emotions were riled by this magnificent story.

I sped right through this book neglecting everything else around me, except, of course, the beautiful day happening right outside my opened garage door.

An excellent read that should definitely be on everyone's TBR pile.

I have been wanting to read this book since before it came out last year. Alas, it was not to happen. Until I signed up to win a copy of the book from the author a few weeks ago. I was psyched when I won. I was really psyched to discover when I received the book that it was a hardcover and signed by the author!!! Double Psych!!!!

Thanks to the author, (many, many thanks) for providing me with a free signed hard cover!! As I said, I review all books I read and I was delighted to do so for this book.

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review 2018-01-24 18:18
Great Mystery/Drama. Enjoyed this one.
The Widow - Fiona Barton

***Possible spoilers ahead. You’ve been warned***

 

For just one split second I almost thought Bella was alive somewhere because a part of me was hoping she was. Nope. What it was, instead was Jeanie’s poor tormented mind and the result of being emotionally manipulated by Glen all this time.

 

You couldn’t help but feel for Jeanie throughout this book. You could already tell from the beginning that she was being mentally and emotionally abused by Glen. That takes its’ toll and added with the fact that she wanted children and Glen’s got some pretty sick and twisted tastes, well that’s not going to work out now is it. So I do sympathize with Jeanie. It wasn’t until the last third of the book where she finally starts becoming her own person away from Glen, but by that point the damage is already done to her mentally. It’s sad to see. I can see why people were hating on her since she’s could have spoken out and told the police everything. Thing is, since Glen had this emotional power over her, it’s hard to overcome. You can’t help but feel frustrated but helpless at the same time when it comes to Jeanie.

 

I enjoyed reading the different points of view throughout the book although Jeanie takes up the bulk of the novel. The other point of view from the Police was also well done and you can see how much it takes it’s toll on everyone emotionally and mentally.

 

The only character I don’t have much of a like for is Kate. I understand she’s doing her job but it just seems heartless at the same time since it feels like she’s doing it at the expense of Jeanie. So I’m glad Jeanie finally grew a backbone - albeit a bit too late.

 

The plot was good and well done. I can’t imagine how it would feel for those that have gone through this similar ordeal. It’s tiring on all sides and by the end of the book you’re also feeling the emotional and mental drain. It was an enjoyable read though. It definitely had me turning the pages and I do recommend this to those who like a good mystery/drama.

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review 2018-01-09 18:31
The Widow's Broom by Chris Van Allsburg
The Widow's Broom - Chris Van Allsburg

Title:  The Widow's Broom

Author:  Chris Van Allsburg

Genre:  Horror / Witches / Halloween 

Year Published: 1992

Year Read: 2010

Publisher:   Houghton Mifflin Company

Source:  Library

Content Rating:  Ages 5+  (Intense Themes of Witchcraft)

 

Widow

“The Widow’s Broom” is a haunting story from the great mind of Chris Van Allsburg and it is about how a lonely widow named Minna Shaw finds a friend in a witch’s broom, but is threatened by the villagers to get rid of the broom because the know that it is witch crafted. “The Widow’s Broom” may have some controversial material about witchcraft, but it is a brilliant read for children who love haunting stories.

Chris Van Allsburg makes this story haunting yet memorable at the same time as it details the story of friendship between a widow and her broom and the bond that Minna Shaw and the broom share together will definitely show children about the importance of friendship even in the worse of times such as when the broom was being harassed by the villagers because it was witch crafted. Chris Van Allsburg’s illustrations are highly beautiful and haunting at the same time as the images are mainly in black and white giving the story a haunting and old fashioned feel since this story probably took place during the 1700s and the image that stood out the most was the image of the broom itself as its handle actually curves when it is doing the work for Minna and because the broom looks so innocent and friendly, many children would actually like the broom instead of fear it.

Widow

Parents should know that the theme of witchcraft in this book might be too sensitive to readers who do not approve of witchcraft, even though personally, this subject does not bother me so much since I am a huge fan of Harry Potter, but the broom in this book was friendly and he only threw up the Spivey boys and the dog because they were harassing the broom. Depending on your views on the subject on witchcraft, parents should talk about this book with their children and see how they handle the witchcraft theme.

“The Widow’s Broom” is a brilliant book about the importance of true friendship and will be an instant treat for children who love reading haunting books. I would recommend this book to children ages five and up due to the witchcraft theme might be scary for smaller children.

Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

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review 2017-12-13 01:23
WIDOW’S POINT Review
Widow’s Point - Richard T. Chizmar

As of late, I’ve become fascinated with video recordings of the explorations of abandoned places—psych hospitals, schools, shopping malls. There is a treasure trove of this type of thing on YouTube. (Dan Bell is my favorite, check him out!) Perhaps I am a little late to that particular party, but I have arrived all the same. Like most folks, I think the mystique of locations long forgotten is a powerful one, though I am too easily scared to explore such places in real life.

 

Widow’s Point, the upcoming novella by Richard Chizmar and son Billy Chizmar, plays on this interest: what if an acclaimed author of thirteen books about the supernatural were to spend three nights locked in the aged, possibly haunted Widow’s Point Lighthouse? And what if he were to record in real time his findings (or lack thereof)?

 

Due to an early camera malfunction, a good chunk of this story is told in first-person by author Thomas Livingston — he is using his trust audio recorder. Things are fine, uneventful . . . until they’re not. In the pages leading up to dizzying, throat-clenching climax Livingston informs whoever happens to hear his recordings when all is said and done of the lighthouse’s history: the murders that have happened there, the suicides, the vanishings, the possessions. The Chizmars do an excellent job of conveying the history of this lighthouse without getting bogged down in excessive detail or needless exposition. The weight and importance of this place, these possibly cursed grounds, are quite apparent from the first.

 

A rich and satisfying tale, Widow’s Point is a haunted ‘house’ story that utilizes the conventions of the genre while turning them on their heads, making for a totally original, frightening, and unforgettable tale of macabre, intrigue. No doubt will I revisit this nasty little bugger in the future.

 

Thanks to Richard Chizmar for the ARC, which was provided in exchange for an honest review. This is it.

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review 2017-12-11 22:32
Widow's Web / Jennifer Estep
Widow's Web - Jennifer Estep

Once an assassin, always an assassin. So much for being plain old Gin Blanco. With every lowlife in Ashland gunning for me, I don’t need another problem, but a new one has come to town.

Salina might seem like a sweet Southern belle, but she’s really a dangerous enemy whose water elemental magic can go head-to-head with my own Ice and Stone power. Salina also has an intimate history with my lover, Owen Grayson, and now that she’s back in town, she thinks he’s hers for the taking.

Salina’s playing a mysterious game that involves a shady local casino owner with a surprising connection to Owen. But they call me the Spider for a reason. I’m going to untangle her deadly scheme, even if it leaves my love affair hanging by a thread.

 

It really struck me as I was reading this volume of the Elemental Assassin series (number 7, if you’re counting) that Jennifer Estep is really working her way through all the relationship issues that a woman can have. The first couple of books revolve around being fixated on the wrong person—the one you’ve got chemistry with, but not necessarily shared values. The relationship that’s doomed from the start, but you’re still inexplicably drawn to (that would be detective Donovan Caine).

Then Gin meets Owen Grayson, someone she’s got things in common with—this is the stage where she’s found someone who could be compatible, but she’s not sure he’ll accept all of her, even the ruthless parts. They do the “do we really trust each other” dance for a couple of books, before seeming to settle into a pretty solid relationship.

The last book tested Gin’s commitment—bringing Donovan back into her life, seemingly anxious to reconcile. She passes on Mr. Caine, realizing that they still have polar opposite values and that it couldn’t possibly work. This book, its Owen’s turn, as his former fianceé Salina returns to Ashland, determined to get him back.

Things that I have complained about in earlier books—repetition, mostly—isn’t present in this installment. Estep seems to have either matured as a writer or found a much more stringent editor who doesn’t put up with it. As a result, the books are much more entertaining and my irritation quotient is dramatically reduced.

A nice little urban fantasy hit to keep my addiction alive!

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