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review 2017-11-05 00:00
The Spontaneous Healing of Belief 4-CD set: Shattering the Paradigm of False Limits
The Spontaneous Healing of Belief 4-CD s... The Spontaneous Healing of Belief 4-CD set: Shattering the Paradigm of False Limits - Gregg Braden Interesting ideas, presented in an entertain way. This book is worth re-reading and contemplating, regardless of your state of agreement or disagreement. At the last track/chapter you'll find a very convenient list of what the author refers to as rules, which are essentially the main points of this book.
I would suggest a printed or electronic copy rather than an audio book. In this way you can easily return to parts that interest you and skip what you probably have heard and read ten thousand times like: Roger Bannister breaking the four-minute mile record.
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review 2017-11-02 21:06
Eight Is Enough - Tom Braden

This is Tom Braden's story of how life is with his wife Joan and their eight kids. It was the basis for the TV show Eight is Enough. This book is written like Tom is observing how his family revolves around him day to day and then taking notes about his observations. There doesn't seem to be a lot of interaction or conversations between Tom and his kids, he does do a lot of complaining about his 8 kids throughout the book.

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review 2017-06-22 00:55
Eight Is Enough - Tom Braden

This book was the basis of the tv show "Eight is Enough" which I loved and watched every week. It was the about the trials and tribulations of having eight kids. The show, according to this book, did a very good portraying this family.

There were some funny stories. I loved the telegram from RFK to Tom Braden that said "you win." meaning that Tom had eight kids and RFK only had seven at that time.

A fun, enjoyable read that had me on IMDB looking up the cast of characters and seeing what had become of all those kids. A real trip down memory lane.

Thanks to Open Road Integrated Media and Net Galley for providing me with a free e-galley in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.

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review 2017-06-10 00:00
Eight Is Enough: A Father's Memoir of Life with His Extra-Large Family
Eight Is Enough: A Father's Memoir of Li... Eight Is Enough: A Father's Memoir of Life with His Extra-Large Family - Tom Braden I wish I could give this book a rating of 1 and a half stars instead of 2. This is Tom Braden's story of how life is with his wife Joan and their eight kids. It was the basis for the tv show Eight is Enough. The book is written like Tom is observing how his family revolves around him day to day and then taking notes about his observation. There doesn't seem to be a lot of interaction or conversations between Tom and his kids, he also does a lot of complaining about his kids.
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review 2017-04-03 22:56
Spies and More Spies
Sub Rosa: The O.S.S. and American Espionage - Stewart Alsop,Thomas Braden

Disclaimer: ARC via Netgalley

 

                In my English 101 class, we just talked about spies and saboteurs in World War II.   It was in a conversation about an essay that dealt with the changing nature of history books in schools.  We were discussing people and ideas that history books leave out.  Female resistance members and the dropping of people into occupied countries came up.

 

                Perhaps we don’t like talking about such people in wars because there is a whiff, just a whiff, of something not quite right.  It is almost sneaky but in an understandable way.  It is the question of tough choices and we really know that real spies are not James Bond in any of his incarnations.   It is messy and tough, and not fair.

 

                Perhaps that is why.  Perhaps this is also why we romanticize the role because we know that it is a necessary one.

 

                This slim volume gives a brief history of the OSS (the forerunner to the CIA) built pretty much by Wild Bill Donovan as well as detailing some of the lesser known missions.  Both Alsop and Braden worked for the OSS, so the reader gets a sense of wanting the deserved acknowledgement.

 

                Considering the time in which the authors lived, they deserve absolute kudos for noting woman agents and pointing out that the women agents did not hesitate to throw themselves out of perfectly good airplanes.  It almost makes up for the use of only male missions in the second section of the book.

 

                The authors also note the use of non-white agents as well.

 

                Yet the authors do deserve praise for not trying to sugar coat not only the risks but also the need to sometimes act in a less than chivalrous way, this is particularly true of the last class.

 

                At times, the stories seem to be a bit blogged down with words (and sometimes with too similar names), yet Alsop and Braden do a good job at bringing a little known but very important role in the Second World War to light.

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