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Search tags: crime-thriller
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review 2018-08-12 16:44
Whispers Under Ground - Ben Aaronovitch
Whispers Under Ground - Ben Aaronovitch

Auch der dritte Teil der Rivers of London-Serie ist gewohnt amüsant. Fokussierter als die ersten beiden Bände, weniger überfrachtet mit allerlei magischen Figuren, was der Handlung gut getan hat. Die Ermittlungsarbeiten zum Mordfall haben sich für meinen Geschmack etwas zu lang hingezogen, wirkliche Spannung wollte da nicht aufkommen; aber ich mag die kleinen Abschweifungen und Fakten zur Geschichte und Architektur Londons.

 

Schade finde ich, dass die englischen EBook-Ausgaben so lieblos gesetzt sind. Häufig fehlen Interpunktionzeichen, mitten im Satz, wo ein Komma stehen sollte, steht plötzlich ein Punkt... Es sind Kleinigkeiten, aber ein bisschen Sorgfalt sollte man doch schon walten lassen, wenn man ein Produkt verkauft.

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text 2018-08-10 18:50
Whispers Under Ground - Reading progress update: I've read 51%.
Whispers Under Ground - Ben Aaronovitch

It wasn’t me,’ he said.

‘What wasn’t you?’ I asked.

‘Nothing,’ he said.

 

Classic.

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review 2018-08-10 13:59
Review: “Boystown 11: Heart's Desire” (Boystown Mysteries, #11) by Marshall Thornton
Boystown 11: Heart's Desire - Marshall Thornton

 

~ 4 stars ~

 

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review 2018-08-07 11:27
Punishment - Scott J. Holliday
Punishment (Detective Barnes Series Book 1) - Scott J. Holliday

Thoroughly avarage.

 

Punishment is a run-of-the-mill thriller starring a run-of-the-mill detective trying to catch a run-of-the-mill serial killer. Of course the serial killer leaves clues behind, of course he wants to be caught, and of course the case is soon becoming personal for our detective.

 

The best thing about this book, apart from the really beautiful cover, was the sci-fi element: cops use machines to extract memories from victims of crime, including murder victims, in a hope to catch a glimpse of the perpetrators. The same memories are later used as punishment for perps - hence the title. The idea is not exactly new, but it's well executed. Cops like our main character Barnes have to live through the memories of murder victims again and again, and it does a number on them. And the author actually makes good use of the setting of Detroit.

 

It was entertaining enough, but I don't think I will read the sequel. Except that one has a nice cover, too. Well, maybe next summer, when I'm craving the cheap thrills again.

 

Machine City cover

 

 

Source: amazon.de
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review 2018-08-01 13:23
Ways to Die in Glasgow - Jay Stringer
Ways to Die in Glasgow - Jay Stringer

I'm a bit lazy during this heat wave, so I'll give you the official synopsis:

 

A violent drunk with a broken heart, Mackie looks for love in all the wrong places. When two hit men catch him with his pants down, he barely makes it out alive. Worse still, his ex-gangster uncle, Rab, has vanished, leaving him an empty house and a dead dog.

 

Reluctant PI Sam Ireland is hired by hotshot lawyers to track Rab but is getting nothing except blank stares and slammed doors. As she scours the dive bars, the dregs of Glasgow start to take notice.

 

DI Andy Lambert is a cop in the middle of an endless shift. A body washes up, and the city seems to shiver in fear; looks like it’s up to Lambert to clean up after the lowlifes again.

 

As a rampaging Mackie hunts his uncle, the scum of the city come out to play. And they play dirty. It seems that everyone has either a dark secret or a death wish. In Mackie’s case, it might just be both.

 

Ways to Die in Glasgow hits fast, hits hart, and delivers its punch with pitch black humour. It's just my kind of pulp.

 

I discovered Jay Stringer through his Eoin Miller Mysteries, some of the very few stories with a Roma lead character (although not #ownvoice). Those were set in England's Black Country, Stringer's old home. He's since moved to Glasgow, and the city became the new setting for his stories as well. Just like the Black Country, Glasgow builds a lively background for our hapless protagonists. During the course of 24 hours, they have to face murder attempts, betrayal, secrets, and ever shifting alliances. You can never be too sure who's on your side and who's gonna shoot you in the back as soon you look the other way.

 

Stringer chose a different narrative style for each of his three POV characters: 1st person past tense for Sam, close 3rd person past tense for Lambert, and the ever irritating 1st person present tense for Mackie. It's a bit gimmicky and not strictly necessary, as all three characters already have a distinct voice, but it doesn't get too annoying. Mackie's chapter are the most entertaining by far – he's not exactly sharp, but a force of nature. And he's got his priorities straight:

 

Now I'm fucked off.

Shoot me? Aye, I'm and annoying shite – I get that.

Shoot Jenny T to get to me? Well, she chose to be with me, I guess; she took her chances.

Grab my Uncle Rab? Well, Rab's pissed of a lot of people.

But shoot a dog?

I'm going to fuck them up big.

 

Mackie sets to his task with all the detective skills he's learned from watching hours of Columbo. Of course, that doesn't go well.

 

This is also one of the rare cases where the dreadful 1st person present tense not only works out, but is actually the best choice.

 

Ways to Die in Glasgow is not the most realistic story, but a fun romp, a bit like the early Guy Ritchie films. Also very brutal. Don't get too attached to the characters, they might not be around for long.

 

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