logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: graphic-novels
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-29 10:15
Through the Woods by Emily Carroll
Through the Woods - Emily Carroll

I think I found a new favorite book. No, really! I meant to read this graphic novel during Halloween since I heard from many people that it's quite the spooky read. Unfortunately, Life happened and I didn't get around to reading it until now. And I am so glad I did! It's everything I love in a horror graphic novel and more! I stood up till five in the morning reading this and I was quite spooked, especially with that last story!

 

Through the Woods is a collection of five horror stories accompanied by grotesque art to add to the scary elements, and it works great together. Emily Carroll did a fantastic job of keeping each story straight to the point and the reader always on the edge of their seat. Each story takes some inspiration from fairy tales and the true horrors each one contains. I will not tell you anything about the stories themselves because it's supposed to be scary. If I tell you anything about them then that gives away the suspense factor. Horror is a genre best going in blind so trust me when I say that there's something spooky in here for everyone to enjoy. The last story really made my skin crawl. *BA DUM TSSS*

 

The art is fantastic! I've already touched on this a little bit, but if you are someone who likes their horror more visual, then read this book. Carroll's artwork is beautiful but when it comes to creeping out the reader, she is not afraid to enter into the world of the macabre. There's blood and murder and grotesqueness all over this book so if you are squeamish,  you might want to skip this one. But if the violence doesn't bother you, then I highly recommend you read this book!

 

It's fast, action-packed, beautiful, and horrifying. If you love reading horror, then I think you should pick up this graphic novel. It's perfect for the dark and colder nights this time of year! I hope you enjoy this story collection as much as I did!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-28 00:41
All's Faire in Middle School by Victoria Jamieson
All's Faire in Middle School - Victoria Jamieson

Preteen angst visits the ren-faire and it was enjoyable.

Imogene has grown up working and playing at the Renaissance Faire where her parents work. This year she's old enough to start training as a squire and she's proud of the responsibility. Too prove her worth she decides to brave public school after a lifetime of homeschooling. She soon runs afoul of cliquey preteen girls who criticize her clothes and she becomes aware that her family and her home are not like everyone else's.

Middle school is just awful. There's no pretending its anything else. Jamieson writes a all-too-typical story with an unusual flair.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-26 20:21
Review: Maus I and II by Art Spiegelman
Maus I and II (boxed set) - Art Spiegelman

I have been meaning to get around to reading Maus but could never find the time or the space to do so. Luckily my library has both books and the book recommendation book by the librarian I had read earlier this month named Maus as a book that all librarians should read/recommend to patrons, and the time and place for reading was now and for the Pop Sugar challenge (each book filled one prompt).

 

I really liked the stark artwork and how the story was told via mice (Jews), cats (Germans), pigs (Poles), and frogs (French). There are two stories within Maus: the story of Spiegelman's father and mother going through the Holocaust and the story of Spiegelman and his father learning about each other and how to deal with conflict in their relationship. I didn't see any reason for Spiegelman's wife to be in the story in the second book - she didn't have any insight and was used as mainly a back up for when Spiegelman had a fight with his dad. By the end of the story, I think Spiegelman grew close with his dad after knowing what his parents' went through but was not quite at the complete understanding of what that kind of trauma formed the father he knew and the lingering issues that crept up in his life later.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-22 08:21
Fence (Issue #1) by C.S. Pacat; Illustrated by Johanna the Mad
Fence #1 - C.S. Pacat,Johanna Lindsey Fence #1 - C.S. Pacat,Johanna Lindsey

As you know (if you've been following my reviews for a while now), I am a huge fan of C.S. Pacat. I love her Captive Prince trilogy. Those are some of my favorite books of all time and since I've read them, I've decided that I will read everything else she has ever written in whatever form of media she chooses. So when I heard she was creating a comic about queer fencers, I pre-ordered my copy right there and then. When I discovered Johanna the Mad was the artist for this comic, I jumped for joy! Johanna is known in the fandom world for her many contributions to various different anime and manga. Basically, these two are a force to be reckon with and I was so excited to read their work.

 

Well, FENCE does not disappoint. I can't talk about it too much since it is the very first issue of the comic, but I will say this comic is everything I've hoped for. It's everything I love about sports anime, from the love of the sport to the rivalries to the ambition of always striving to do better! It's incredible! Plus, it's about a sport I know very little about: fencing. I love that the reader will not only be invested in the characters and their struggles, but they will also learn about fencing as a sport. I'm curious to learn more about fencing and seeing how the characters develop their skills. 

 

Speaking of characters, we are introduced to the main two. Nicholas Cox and Seiji Katayama. Nicholas is a character who grew up in poverty, is a bit of a loner, and has an attitude but loves fencing. Seiji seems to be someone who has it all and is a bit full of it because of his talent. These two, naturally, butt heads and a rivalry ensues. I can tell these two are going to have quite the relationship. >:3 

 

The artwork adds to the enjoyment of the story. It's so gorgeous and stunning! Johanna has done an amazing job at bringing these characters to life. Both C.S. Pacat and Johanna the Mad have worked really hard to bring this comic to life and it shows.

 

If you are a fan of any of these ladies, if you love their work, if you love sports anime, if you love queer content, then I highly recommend you check this comic out. It's such an amazing first issue and I am so looking forward to reading the other issues as they are released!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-21 03:35
Brave, (Awkward #2) by Svetlana Chmakova
Brave - Svetlana Chmakova
  Jensen is having a hard time in middle school, but the tragic fact, initially at least for the reader, is that he doesn't know it. Because he believes that sunspots are a real danger to us all, among other reasons, he's teased, tormented, and even ignored or taken for granted by his classmates.

Chmakova's story is full of humor and affectionate for its characters, and the first half of it was a great character study. As for the second part, most people won't have any issues, but I was bothered by how the plot was resolved. Brave has an important message, but I don't know if its the right way to teach compassion.

 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?