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review 2019-03-23 20:45
Date with a Devil: A Hockey Romance (Dallas Devils Book 1) by June Winters
Date with a Devil (Dallas Devils #1) - June Winters

 

 

She wasn't looking for trouble. So why did it land directly at her front door? Dane and Austen have a major league attraction going on. Winters gives a peek into the minds and hearts of a nuclear explosion. Dane is a tabloid's dream and PR's worst nightmare. Austen could be his saving grace, if she doesn't lose her heart, along the way. Date with a Devil brings heat on and off the ice.

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review 2019-01-09 14:24
ARC REVIEW Hot Target Cowboy by June Faver
Hot Target CowboyDark Horse Cowboy #2, I never thought I would fall in love with Colt as much as I did. Reading the first book, which isn't necessary to enjoy this one, Colt comes across as cool, comprised, and hard well Colt is but after one dance and one day with Misty Dalton he proclaims that she is the woman he's going to marry. Colt falls head over cowboy boots for Misty and will do just about anything for her, which has his father and his younger brother worried about her. 

Misty dropped out of college to take care of her father when he got sick and has been running her family's ranch ever since but now the bank foreclosing on the ranch and Misty is more determined than ever to save her birthright even if it means selling off everything that's not bolted down. After selling of the horses Misty older, selfish, brother is murdered and then her father's health gives out that same night. Misty at a loss of what to do next allows Colt to help, he takes her and her younger brother home until they can figure out who killed her brother and when her ranch is safe. Misty not wanting to rely on Colt's charity for long takes a job and Colt comes up with a plan to help save her ranch. The murder of Misty's brother was only the beginning and before Misty and Colt can have their HEA they need to catch the culprit.

Overall, great read. I loved the insta-love on Colt's part being such a tough cowboy he has a soft spot for her and her little brother. I liked that as much as he wanted to protect Misty he still let her do things for herself even if he didn't like the idea and I liked that Misty could stand up for herself and even though she didn't want Colt's charity she was able to accept his help but didn't come to rely on him for everything. I love Big Jim and we did get a couple of pages that were from Tyler and Leah's POV (character from the last book) and that was nice to see Colt and Misty's story from that perspective. Beau, Colt's younger brother, was a bit of a pill this book and that kinda pissed me off but I know he's going to get his just desserts in the next book. The suspense part of the book was good I thoroughly enjoyed it, it kind of zig zagged a bit the first half of the book not knowing where it will lead but the conclusion was great.

 

 

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text 2018-08-30 16:36
Reconstructing Jackson By Holly Bush 99 cents!
Reconstructing Jackson Paperback June 25, 2014 - Holly Bush

1867 . . . Southern lawyer and Civil War veteran, Reed Jackson, returns to his family’s plantation in a wheelchair. His father deems him unfit, and deeds the Jackson holdings, including his intended bride, to a younger brother. Angry and bitter, Reed moves west to Fenton, Missouri, home to a cousin with a successful business, intending to start over.

Belle Richards, a dirt poor farm girl aching to learn how to read, cleans, cooks and holds together her family’s meager property. A violent brother and a drunken father plot to marry her off, and gain a new horse in the bargain. But Belle’s got other plans, and risks her life to reach them.

Reed is captivated by Belle from their first meeting, but wheelchair bound, is unable to protect her from violence. Bleak times will challenge Reed and Belle's courage and dreams as they forge a new beginning from the ashes of war and ignorance.

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review 2018-07-05 22:22
The Desert Spear / Peter V. Brett
The Desert Spear - Peter V. Brett

The sun is setting on humanity. The night now belongs to voracious demons that prey upon a dwindling population forced to cower behind half-forgotten symbols of power.

Legends tell of a Deliverer: a general who once bound all mankind into a single force that defeated the demons. But is the return of the Deliverer just another myth? Perhaps not.

Out of the desert rides Ahmann Jardir, who has forged the desert tribes into a demon-killing army. He has proclaimed himself Shar'Dama Ka, the Deliverer, and he carries ancient weapons--a spear and a crown--that give credence to his claim.

But the Northerners claim their own Deliverer: the Warded Man, a dark, forbidding figure.

 

This book is a distinct change of view from the first one, The Warded Man. We must back up and approach this story again, this time from the Krasian point of view. Jardir, who seemed like simply a back-stabbing traitor in book one now has his own version of the same events, giving us an alternate POV in this one.

We learn far more about Krasian civilization, which seems to be heavily based on early Middle Eastern cultures, with warrior values, harems of women, and contempt for outsiders, both non-warriors within the culture & actual foreigners. Many parallels can be seen within Arlen’s agrarian society, which is extremely patriarchal and very hidebound (very like medieval Europe), something which can happen when a society is under siege.

It almost seems, in this installment, that everyone has become much too comfortable with the demon-haunted night. Both societies seem to be channeling their inner demon hunters and the tension of the first book is gone in this regard. Hints are happening that we may soon get the POV of the demons—will they get the same sympathetic treatment as Jardir?

Arlen and Jardir were friends at one point—now they are rivals. Which one will become the great Unifier who will unite humanity and defeat the Corelings (demons)? But while Jardier claims to be the Deliverer, Arlen denies the title just as strenuously. Nevertheless, the demons clearly see them both as threats. These men could also have been rivals over Leesha if Brett had written things a little differently, but that ship seems to have sailed.

I’m displeased that my library doesn’t have book three and there’s no time for them to order it before I see Peter Brett at the When Words Collide conference in August. I’m not usually known for laying out the dinero for new books, but if I can get a bit of a discount at the merchants’ corner, I’ll maybe spring for book 3 (since I note that the library has books 4 & 5).

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review 2018-07-05 20:15
Casino Royale / Ian Fleming
Casino Royale - Ian Fleming

In the novel that introduced James Bond to the world, Ian Fleming’s agent 007 is dispatched to a French casino in Royale-les-Eaux. His mission? Bankrupt a ruthless Russian agent who’s been on a bad luck streak at the baccarat table.

One of SMERSH’s most deadly operatives, the man known only as “Le Chiffre,” has been a prime target of the British Secret Service for years. If Bond can wipe out his bankroll, Le Chiffre will likely be “retired” by his paymasters in Moscow. But what if the cards won’t cooperate? After a brutal night at the gaming tables, Bond soon finds himself dodging would-be assassins, fighting off brutal torturers, and going all-in to save the life of his beautiful female counterpart, Vesper Lynd.

 

***2018 Summer of Spies***

Two things about this book surprised me—first that Fleming was a pretty good writer, second that the book was so short! I’ve never attempted any of Fleming’s fiction before, partly because I saw some of the films of these works back about 30 years ago. You can’t live in a co-ed residence in university without at least having some of these movies on the lounge television set and I think I may have been dragged to the movie theatre as well (back when a movie only cost $5 and a person could afford to go).

Bond in the book is much less charming than Bond on the screen. He’s rougher around the edges and the racism & misogyny of earlier times are very apparent. It’s difficult for me to judge—how much of this is the fictional character, how much is just the zeitgeist of the 1950s, and how much of this is Ian Fleming himself?

I’ve requested a biography of Fleming from the library, to help me try to sort this matter. I’m also intrigued by how much he was influenced by the work of Agatha Christie. One of the very first scenes in Casino Royale involves Bond checking to see if his room has been searched, using exactly the same stratagem as a character in Christie’s They Came to Baghdad (the use of precisely placed, unobtrusive hairs). Undoubtedly Fleming read Christie, so I’m interested in that angle as well.

One can’t claim to have read spy fiction without reading Fleming, so I will pick up Live and Let Die in the near future and continue on during my Summer of Spies.

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