logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: lit-fiction
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-07-22 07:53
Poison City (London Tau) - Paul Crilley

I'm still very new to urban fantasy, so maybe I couldn't appreciate this book as much as I felt I should. I always read the blurb and think, wow, that sounds great but somehow the stories always leave me wanting. I think it is because they straddle genres - humor and horror - but they don't seem to be able to maintain both at the same time, so just when you are getting in to the jokes it becomes serious and gory. Not that I mind serious and gory but then I expect the scares which are hard to come by in a humorous book.

 

Aaaanyway, I did enjoy this even if I didn't think it was as great as I had hoped (let's face it, few books are). The setting was unusual, South African Durban, but Gideon Tau (known as London) felt like a rather generic hero. On the other hand, I had a picture in my head of the comedian Sarah Millican as his boss, Armitage which was quite amusing and I really think the sherry-swilling, ball-licking, talking, magic dog should get a story all of his own (although I'm not sure you would be able to tear him away from his soaps long enough to have an adventure).

 

As I bought books 1 and 2 at the same time for very little money I will read the sequel but I have to say if I had to pay full price for it I probably wouldn't.

 

A note on the Kindle edition - it has no page numbers, which I find really annoying!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-07-22 04:12
The Inner Life of Cats by Thomas McNamee
The Inner Life of Cats: The Science and Secrets of Our Mysterious Feline Companions - Thomas McNamee

This book alternated between being compulsively readable and making me wonder where the heck the author was trying to go with things. There is a lot of interesting information but sometimes it was like the author was confused about whether he should be arguing to deal with cats in a certain way, or he'd bounce around topics while really you just wanted to know whether he found his cat Augusta safe and sound in the end after one of her little escapades. I really wish he had just stopped letting her go outside. I couldn't take the suspense.

 

The infamous chapter 7, while sad, was quite good, and made me bump up my rating from 2.5 stars.

 

I guess I'd describe the book as being about understanding cats rather than being about cats, with a bit of science thrown in.

 

Previous updates:

72 of 235 pages (Balou likes to be loud)

7 of 235 pages (questionable cat hearing data)

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-07-21 22:23
Reading progress update: I've read 83 out of 404 pages.
E.M. Forster: A New Life - Wendy Moffat

It appears that the author has given me a rest from her dissection of Forster's love life and we now a have a (hopefully extended) period of discussing the rest of his life.

 

I knew that Forster was a tutor to Elizabeth von Arnim's children but didn't know about the anecdote of his arrival at her castle, or about descriptions his employer. 

 

I am not typing these right here but much of the quotes are also provided in this post on the Books as Food blog. 

 

What was even more interesting, there are some glimpses now about Forster's, Morgan's, development as a writer - the stuff that makes his book stand out so from others of the time: 

While in Nassenheide, Morgan turned to his diary to ruminate on the wider question of how he fit into the world. He felt out of touch with modern writers. In its infancy, the novel had been novel - of all the literary forms, it made the unique promise of showing life truthfully - but the conventions of the nineteenth-century novels Morgan revered had begun to feel a little like a cage. It seemed to him wrongheaded, even trivial these days simply to end a novel with "the old, old answer, marriage": "Artists now realise that marriage, the old full stop, is not an end at all..." Resolving a plot with marriage was part of the imperative of comedy, but the blind optimism of lesser writers seemed dishonest to him: "The writer who depicts [life as a bed of roses] may possibly be praised for his healthy simplicity. But his own conscience will never approve him, for he knows that healthiness and simplicity are not, in all cases, identical with truth. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-07-21 20:38
Boystown 6
Boystown 6: From the Ashes - Marshall Thornton

We were quiet a long time and then he said, “I love you.” 
I wondered if I’d misunderstood him. The discomfort of the idea must have shown on my face because he added, “I don’t mean I love you that way. Not like I love Ross. Not like you love Harker. I mean, I care about you, Nick. You’re my friend. With all the things that are happening in the world, shouldn’t it be okay? Just to say I love you?”
“Yes, it should be okay.”
And it was.

 

Some great new characters and relationships here. But damn the heart. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-07-21 14:51
There Is A Place Where Wayward Children Exist...
Every Heart a Doorway - Seanan McGuire

What if the world we live in is our reality and there is another world beside ours exist? A world where belongs to you that you will call home. A fantasy world filled with sugar candies or a world where you are the prince in the Goblin Market. Where worlds exist isn't ours that your parents do not believe you even you had being there for a long time, thought missing or kidnap and return to the living, labelled crazy that your parents sent you to a boarding school called Eleanor's West Home for Wayward Children that helps these troubled children, only that this is a place that helps them because the the principal believes there are such worlds exist because... she has cross over before. This is the premise of Every Hear A Doorway, the first book of the Wayward Children series written by Seanan McGuire, a science fiction fantasy novella that is quite unique and yet similar to some other stories you might have heard before. While there is originality to its own, it is enjoyable and yet predictable.

 

It begins with a girl named Nancy Whitman, an ordinary teenager looking girl except for her white hair arrived at the manor, where she meets the residence of the Wayward Children. There, she discovers other children with similar experiences like her on different scale or level, some lived in worlds that are light and others lived in worlds that are dark and bleak. As she starts to discover and learn about the boarding school, one by one, children turns up dead in gruesome manner. Are any of the deaths, related to her or to anyone that lives in the world of the dark?

 

Reading Every Heart A Doorway to me is enjoyable because for its straight-to-a-point story where it doesn't waste much time as it progresses pretty much forward without any bullsh*t. And then, the world building is an interesting one where this reality explores portals opens to each children of their heart desires is intriguing and I believe, not done before. The building suspense of its mystery of the murders on the other hand at the beginning is plotted out pretty well, it was towards the end where its predictable when discovered who the real murderer was in the same old fashion reasoning why 'I done it because' excuse just fail to my expectation. Overall, I like it and I feel 3.5 out of 5 stars deserves its rating. I will be reading the next chapter, as although its not a sequel but rather a back-story of one of the characters.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?