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review 2017-05-25 16:09
Mulholland Drive
Water to the Angels: William Mulholland, His Monumental Aqueduct, and the Rise of Los Angeles - Les Standiford

I listened to the audio book and I thought it would be more interesting than it was.  The book is very boring and dry and discussed William Mulholland's upbringing in the late 19th century and early 20th century and how he became the Director of the Water Works for Los Angeles.

 

I cannot recommend this book unless you really, really, really, really like Civil Engineering history and the history of building an aqueduct.  

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text 2017-05-17 06:33
Part 2: Shelving What's on My Library eBook Wishlist
Raintree Trilogy - Linda Howard,Beverly Barton,Linda Winstead Jones
Don't Expect Magic - Kathy McCullough
Scent of Darkness - Christina Dodd
Darkness Unbound (Dark Angels Series #1) - Keri Arthur
To Walk the Night - E.S. Moore
The Mark of Nerath: A Dungeons & Dragons Novel - Bill Slavicsek

Any recommendations for reading any of these?

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review 2017-05-16 06:13
He didn't do it - but who did?
What Angels Fear - C.S. Harris

A satisfying historical mystery set in Regency England, this book tells a story of Sebastian St. Gyr, a wealthy viscount, heir to an earldom, and a bitter, disillusioned man. Retired from the army after a few years of spying against Napoleon, Sebastian leads a life of a bored aristocrat, drinking, fighting duels, and seemingly not caring for his own safety. Until he is falsely accused of brutally murdering a young actress. Then he discovers that he does care whether he lives or dies. He cares a lot. Unwilling to perish for something he didn’t do, he sets out to discover the identity of the real killer.

To evade capture, he disappears into the seediest parts of London as he tries to piece together the victim’s last few days and find out who wanted her dead.

The novel is a bit grittier and darker than I like, but it’s written well, the pacing is relentless, and the characters come out of the pages almost alive. One of the aspects of this book is political. The timing is just before the Regency is announced, and the politicians and their parties are jockeying for power. The author doesn’t have any illusions about the politicians: they are all ruthless sociopaths. They don’t care whether St. Gyr is guilty or not. Some flimsy circumstantial evidence points to him – so of course the order comes down to the local magistrate to apprehend him and charge him. The masses must be appeased before the Regency starts. The justice – or the travesty of it – must be served.

It’s up to St. Gyr to clear his name, and he is practically alone. He has a few allies but none of them belongs to his family. For some reason, his sister hates him, and his father... well, that’s much more complicated. The author doesn’t describe St. Gyr’s family dynamics in details, and I was sorry for it. I wanted to know what happened to this family to make them all so cold and unloving, so hostile towards each other.

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review 2017-05-12 20:58
Book Review for Arranged A Master and Mercenaries Novella by Lexi Blake
 
 
 


 
Arranged
A Master and Mercenaries Novella
by Lexi Blake
 stars
 
Reviewed by: Angels
Format:Kindle
Published: Evil Eye Concepts
Source: ARC
Genre:  Contemporary Romance
 
 
 
Kash Kamdar is the king of a peaceful but powerful island nation. As Loa Mali’s sovereign, he is always in control, the final authority. Until his mother uses an ancient law to force her son into marriage. His prospective queen is a buttoned-up intellectual, nothing like Kash’s usual party girl. Still, from the moment of their forced engagement, he can’t stop thinking about her. 

Dayita Samar comes from one of Loa Mali’s most respected families. The Oxford-educated scientist has dedicated her life to her country’s future. But under her staid and calm exterior, Day hides a few sexy secrets of her own. She is willing to marry her king, but also agrees that they can circumvent the law. Just because they’re married doesn’t mean they have to change their lives. It certainly doesn’t mean they have to fall in love. 

After one wild weekend in Dallas, Kash discovers his bride-to-be is more than she seems. Engulfed in a changing world, Kash finds exciting new possibilities for himself. Could Day help him find respite from the crushing responsibility he’s carried all his life? This fairy tale could have a happy ending, if only they can escape Kash’s past…



We loved this story cover to cover.What a great cast of of characters that were really funny and enjoyable to read about.I cannot tell you how many times I laughed throughout this story something we needed lately.

I loved the plot and its characters.Day she was my favorite in the bunch.I found her to be intelligent,kind,passionate,beautiful inside and out and one who owned her sexuality. Day surprised me the most as she was not the kind of girl that Kash normally went for yet still attracted to.This was a intelligent women who decided to act on her sexual desire and become a Dominatrix making her even a stronger women in her life and work.I loved seeing a strong female character in a story and Day was the perfect match for Kash the worlds most irresponsible playboy who happens to be a king. Kash will never rule his wife in or out of the bedroom the perfect women to make him change and be the man she new he to be all along.I loved that Day got a second chance at love with Kash but, is he willing to except the women she is now without feeling weak?Is she willing to give up what she needs and wants to be able to be with him?I was rooting for Day to stick by her guns and stay true to herself.I just loved everything about her she was just to sweet not to love.

Kash a king with a playboy reputation .I found him to be intelligent and to have a sense of humor but, most of the time I thought he was an a**.I thought about kicking this kings but more than once throughout this story.How could he admire Day for being intelligent kind and a strong women and in his next breath despising her for those qualities.He could not except that she had a past and how she lived her life and yet he had no problem being a king with his sexual interludes splashing the Internet far and wide. Hypocrite much?

A story filled with passion and deceit ,danger,love and regret and second chances.We loved it.I love when you are able to connect with the characters that you read about.And I was able to do that with these characters.I love when you read about two alpha's characters and wait and see if their willing to meet in middle and compromise .

Kash's upbringing is responsible for a lot of his current thinking concerning women but in the same breath he doesn't want see a women be suppressed.I understood his inter struggles as he was a king and didn't want to be seem as weak. But, submitting to his wife in the bedroom was not going to make him weak yet he couldn't and was not willing to give up control in all things.

A great love story that had you rooting for a couple of strong characters who were perfect for one another and had a lot in common yet so far apart.I enjoyed being on this journey of this couples self sexual discovery and learning to see if love truly conquers all.I will definitely be looking to read the rest of the books in this series as we can't wait to read about the other characters we met in this current story.

A recommend story to all. 
 

5 stars from us
 
 


 
 
 






NY Times and USA Today bestselling author Lexi Blake lives in North Texas with her husband, three kids, and the laziest rescue dog in the world. She began writing at a young age, concentrating on plays and journalism. It wasn't until she started writing romance and urban fantasy that she found the stories of her heart. She likes to find humor in the strangest places and believes in happy endings no matter how odd the couple, threesome, or foursome may seem. 

Her first novel, Their Virgin Captive: Masters of Ménage, Book 1, was a collaboration with New York Times bestselling author Shayla Black. There are six more books available in the series: Their Virgin's Secret, Their Virgin Concubine, Their Virgin Princess, Their Virgin Hostage, Their Virgin Secretary, and Their Virgin Mistress.

In addition to the Masters of Ménage series, she is the author of the Masters and Mercenaries series. The first nine novels, The Dom Who Loved Me, The Men with the Golden Cuffs, A Dom is Forever, On Her Master's Secret Service, Love and Let Die, Dungeon Royale, A View to a Thrill, You Only Love Twice, and Master No are available now, along with the novellas Sanctum, Unconditional, Dungeon Games, Cherished, Luscious, Adored, and Just One Taste. The tenth novel, From Sanctum with Love, is coming February 23, 2016, along with a new novella, Devoted, on April 12, 2016.

In 2013, Lexi also began releasing her urban fantasy series, Thieves. The full series, Steal the Light, Steal the Day, Steal the Moon, Steal the Sun, and Steal the Night, are available now on Amazon. The first two books in a spin-off of the series, Ripper and Addict, were released in 2015. Look for Sleeper, the next book in the spin-off series, to be released in Fall of 2016.

Lexi again collaborated with Shayla Black in a new series The Perfect Gentlemen. The first book, Scandal Never Sleeps, is now available. Book two, Seduction in Session, will release on January 5, 2016, followed by book three, Big Easy Temptation, on May 3, 2016.

Sign up for Lexi's FREE newsletter at http://lexiblake.net.

For more information about her books, her appearances and her wacky life visit her Facebook page (http://goo.gl/q2IHnJ) or her website (http://www.lexiblake.net).
 


 
 
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review 2017-05-10 19:34
Recommended to lovers of historical fiction, in particular women’s history and the French Revolution.
Spirit of Lost Angels - Liza Perrat

Thanks to Rosie Amber for organising Rosie’s Book Review Team and to the author for offering me a copy of the book that I freely chose to review.

I had recently read and reviewed Liza Perrat’s fabulous book The Silent Kookaburra (check the review here) and could not pass on the opportunity to read and review another of the author’s books. I had commented on my previous review that the author is well-known for her historical fiction novels and I felt The Silent Kookaburra, although set at a much closer point in time (the 1970s in Australia) also shared the detailed setting, the atmosphere and the background events that made it worthy of that category, together with a very disturbing and beautifully written story.

Spirit of Lost Angels falls neatly into the category of historical fiction. Set in France, a few years before the French revolution, it follows the life of Victoire Charpentier, a young girl born on a farm in a small village, whose mother is a wise woman, midwife and healer to all, and who experiences death and tragedy from a very early age. She is a direct victim of the unfairness of the society of the time (a nobleman’s coach runs her father over and doesn’t even stop) and it is not surprising she wants revenge. Tragedy and disaster pile up in her life and brief moments of happiness are cut short when something else happens. Her story fits also into the category of melodrama, as she always finds herself at the centre of everything, and survives against incredible odds. Her life demonstrates that a woman’s lot is (and was even more so at the time) hard. Losing your husband, children, being raped, accused of being a witch, and being denied a voice, are everyday affairs. One thing that helps Victoire above everything is her literacy. Her reading and writing skills help her keep in touch with loved ones, provide her later with a literary career and with the means to raise consciousness as to the plight of women and the poor, and allow her to meet people and make connections. Eventually, it also helps her fulfil her dream and have a happy ending. The focus on women’s issues and the importance of education are one of the strongest points of the novel for me.

The book is beautifully written, narrated in the first person by the protagonist, who presents as very articulate. As we learn later, she becomes very proficient at writing, although early on there are moments when the beauty of her writing jarred me a bit (when she writes a letter to her daughter Ruby, she’s trying to improve her writing, but her letter is not only deeply felt but also lyrically written in spite of that), although later events and the ending facilitate a different reading of the novel. The beautiful language and the detailed and, at times, poetic descriptions help readers feel transported to the France of the period and experience the smells (and stinks), the touch, the sensations of the different settings (including the horrifying experiences at La Salpêtrière). The historical figures and events of the time (Victoire meets Thomas Jefferson, corresponds with Mary Wollstonecraft and becomes friendly with Jeanne de Valois, who plays an important role in her life) add to the texture and background of the book, making the France of the late XVIIIc even more vivid. The author explains in an endnote that her main character is entirely fictional and all her interactions with historical figures are invented too, although inspired by the real characters.

I enjoyed, in particular, the reflections of the character about the role of women in the society of the time, her terrifying but enlightening period at La Salpêtrière, and her enterprising and determination. This is a novel full of action, where events follow each other quickly and the protagonist suffers more than anyone’s fair share of events, to the point where a degree of suspension of disbelief is required. Perhaps because we follow the character through a long period of time, and Victoire is very much a conduit to reflect historical events and the lot of women at that particular historical period, I did not feel her character was as consistent or psychologically well-drawn as was the case for Tanya in The Silent Kookaburra (where although we see the protagonist at two different ages, most of the story is told from the point of view of 11 y.o. Tanya). That notwithstanding, this is a great story, full of twist and turns, that will transport you to an extremely momentous time and place, and although it is the author’s first novel, it already shows her flair for language and for creating gripping stories.

 

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