logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Badass
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-07-22 01:19
Fast race, turn of the century style
Around the World in Eighty Days - Jules Verne, Brian W. Aldiss,Michael Glencross

That was awesome! I love when this classics turn out to be addictive page-turners. Even though I knew Fogg had to triumph, I admit I had several moments of true anxiety, so double points.

 

Into the podium of Verne's favorites it goes. Now, what do I do with this furious raging of my wanderlust?

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-07-20 01:04
I liked better than WoT
Wizard's First Rule - Terry Goodkind

This is the good stuff. Epic fantasy with about as much patience with the "wait for the answers while I hint you to death" bullshit as I have, an uninformed protagonist that refuses to carry the idiot ball nonetheless, funny and wise wizard, and heavy hitter female (though I got tired of her "let me die before I hurt you" thing waaay before the end). And of the main villain's three appearances (yeah, neat on the rule), the squicky ruthless first, and his eminently charismatic second were a wonder.

Even better: it is pretty much self contained. We are left a lot of issues to pursue in subsequent volumes, but the adventure we start on we finish (and thank god, given all those pages).

It wont be soon, but I'm likely to keep reading this saga.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-07-16 09:16
Some are Eventual
Everything's Eventual: 14 Dark Tales - Stephen King

This is a very well put together collection. What I mean is, almost a third in, it was good, but not awesome. Too much male perspective, maybe. But then it kept getting better an better, and I finished it very satisfied. Not as good as "Nightmares and Dreamscapes", but better than "Skeleton Crew" in my love vs meh stories ratio.

Autopsy Room Four: Weird mix between humorous and harrowing. Likely most of the laughs were out of sheer adrenaline.

The Man in The Black Suit: Childhood nightmare. That dialogue was... *shudder*

All that you love will be carried away: Dreary. Reminded me of Road-work, and his Bachman's writing.

The Death of Jack Hamilston: I guess this one goes in the same bunch with "The Fifth Quarter", but even more "The Wedding Gig". Not my thing.

In the Deathroom: Lots of testosterone on this one too, but it was awesome.

 

It occurred to Fletcher that in the end there might only be one way to tell the thugs from the patriots: when they saw their own death rising in your eyes like water, patriots made speeches. The thugs, on the other hand, gave you the number of their Swiss bank account and offered to put you on-line.

 

And that great line. I'm sure I've read it before, but I can't remember where.

The Little Sisters of Eluria: Bitter-sweet spoiler. Another reminder that I have to get this saga once and for all. And a big time *Ick!*

Everything is Eventual: So disturbing, to read what the young guy says, but to also read between the lines, waiting for the other shoe to drop for him too. "Firestarter" world?

Theory of Pets: I almost bursted something laughing. Then it turn on you. Loved it.

Road Virus Heads North: Revisited themes.

Lunch at the Gotham Café: It misleads you very nicely. It was great.

That Feeling, You Can Only Say What it is in French: Jesus! (yeah, terrible irony). This one was the best and most disturbing for me.

1408: King going Lovecraftian on you.

Riding the Bullet: Starts disturbing, gets harrowing, ends... bittersweet?

Luckey Quarter: That was depressing. I also kept wondering if she was an addict.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-07-02 16:37
Reading progress update: I've read 170 out of 838 pages.
Anna Karenina - Larissa Volokhonsky,Richard Pevear,Leo Tolstoy

"You're a regular reactionist, I see."
"Really, I have never considered what I am. I am Konstantin Levin, and nothing else."

 

I love this character: so awkward, then so gloriously poised. I know he's in his thirties, but he reminds me more of a teen in the cusp of adulthood.

 

Also, the bit about him sowing clover. Maybe because I've seen it expounded as a grounding thing before in "The Good Earth", or maybe it's my childhood memories of gardening with my grandpa, but it really got to me.

And then some pages later, he goes on this rampage:

 

You talk of his being an aristocrat. But allow me to ask what it consists in, that aristocracy of Vronsky or of anybody else, beside which I can be looked down upon? You consider Vronsky an aristocrat, but I don't. A man whose father crawled up from nothing at all by intrigue, and whose mother--God knows whom she wasn't mixed up with.... No, excuse me, but I consider myself aristocratic, and people like me, who can point back in the past to three or four honorable generations of their family, of the highest degree of breeding (talent and intellect, of course that's another matter), and have never curried favor with anyone, never depended on anyone for anything, like my father and my grandfather. And I know many such. You think it mean of me to count the trees in my forest, while you may Ryabinin a present of thirty thousand; but you get rents from your lands and I don't know what, while I don't and so I prize what's come to me from my ancestors or been won by hard work.... We are aristocrats, and not those who can only exist by favor of the powerful of this world, and who can be bought for twopence halfpenny.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-06-13 17:41
Lovely if a bit heavy handed
The Voyage of the Dawn Treader - C.S. Lewis,Pauline Baynes

This was a lovely read. A great opening line, lots of magic and adventure, and Reepicheep, a character that has shot to my favorites list.

 

I have issues with the fact that Aslan was mixed up with turning around every bad habit or decision, because it says redemption or improvement is impossible without religion to me. I like the concept of free will, and I like to think we can pick the right path without constant divine nudges, so a start docked for the heavy handedness.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?