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Search tags: awesomesauce
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text 2017-06-17 12:46
Reading progress update: I've read 25 out of 240 pages.
A Room with a View - E.M. Forster

Much like with "Passage to India", this is a book to savor for the way it's written and the highly quotable dialogues. So far, in less than two chapters

 

“He is rather a peculiar man.” Again he hesitated, and then said gently: “I think he would not take advantage of your acceptance, nor expect you to show gratitude. He has the merit—if it is one—of saying exactly what he means. He has rooms he does not value, and he thinks you would value them. He no more thought of putting you under an obligation than he thought of being polite. It is so difficult—at least, I find it difficult—to understand people who speak the truth.”

 

Love how he establishes both old Emerson's and Beebe's characters through the later's judgment.

 

“About old Mr. Emerson—I hardly know. No, he is not tactful; yet, have you ever noticed that there are people who do things which are most indelicate, and yet at the same time—beautiful?”
“Beautiful?” said Miss Bartlett, puzzled at the word. “Are not beauty and delicacy the same?”
“So one would have thought,” said the other helplessly. “But things are so difficult, I sometimes think.”

 

“Look at him!” said Mr. Emerson to Lucy. “Here’s a mess: a baby hurt, cold, and frightened! But what else can you expect from a church?

 

“My dear,” said the old man gently, “I think that you are repeating what you have heard older people say. You are pretending to be touchy; but you are not really. Stop being so tiresome, and tell me instead what part of the church you want to see. To take you to it will be a real pleasure.”
Now, this was abominably impertinent, and she ought to have been furious. But it is sometimes as difficult to lose one’s temper as it is difficult at other times to keep it.

 

More establishing of old Emerson (I'm half in love with the old man) and some prickly observations on society too. Forster really likes to point hypocrisy, and that's part of why I've loved what I've read by him so far.

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review 2017-06-15 23:48
Granpa, tell me about when you were little
Boy: Tales of Childhood - Roald Dahl,Quentin Blake

What a great biographic piece. Dahl is an excellent story teller, and puts that to use: he doesn't waste pages in the minutia, or get scared of leaving swathes of time undressed, but picks the bits he wants to tell about his early life, because they are important, interesting, colorful, defining. It turns into a very entertaining read.

It paints a picture of a time. I was impressed by his mother courage and strength (and humor, and mettle, and pragmatism... she comes across as one awesome lady), horrified by much of the sadism involved in his education, and somewhat enlightened on the reasons for his often irreverent characters.

I laughed a lot. There is humor inside every part, from the comfort of hindsight, fondness of remembrance, matter-of-fact way harrowing or ridiculous situations are described, or dry irony.

I plain loved it.

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review 2017-06-10 01:56
Sold on the series
White Hot - Ilona Andrews

I had SO MUCH FUN. You could make a chart of who corresponds with whom in the Daniels series, but frankly, I don't give a damn. It was sexy, it was fast, it had cute beasties doing a Mission Impossible stint, and everyone had their badass moment. I'm a happy camper.

It ended in a cliff-hanger of sorts, and I weep thinking of the wait. It could have been left gracefully without the urgency note and I would still have been terribly impatient to know how everything proceeds. I'll forgive it this time because I do love this writing team.

More please.

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review 2017-05-24 01:37
American family meets gothic English ghost
The Canterville Ghost - Oscar Wilde,Inga Moore

The ghost looses. Outrageously.

 

Quick and hilarious. Drama queen ghost, terror twins, painter mary-sue (*snigger* that paint chat, lol), prepared big brother (stain remover in his pocket?) and practical American Minister, it was all fun. Hands down, the theatrical haunting anecdotes were where I would invariably erupt in barks of laughter.

 

I take one star for change of tone, and because it felt like the denouement was too long in comparison with the rest.

 

But I so have to buy this one.

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review 2017-05-02 05:31
Magical underside of city and genre
Neverwhere - Neil Gaiman

I've rediscovered urban fantasy. This is the urban fantasy I was wanting to read when I kept stumbling into that ossified  sub-genre full of vampires and weres. I love me some Hollows or Daniels like I love my fries and ice-cream, but every once in a while I want a different flavor, and it's been hard to find. Behold: Gaiman. I wonder if the man seats at his writing desk and thinks "Well, today I want to pick this genre. Now, how do I go about putting it on it's head/inside out/mashed-up with this other?"

So, urban fantasy about alienation, and tubes, filled with magic and action. Scary stuff of the adult bored with life variety. The unseen people that fell through the cracks... there is horror that feels close to home hinted in the concept. You may disregard it as cynical allegoric analysis. It comes to full fruition and in the open during the ordeal to sock you in the face: "this is what you were thinking was going on, even if you didn't want to admit it". The fantastic aspect makes it exiting and hopeful, and bittersweet.

Maybe not as happy, or a fluffy as I was going for, but it certainly was a change of speeds. I could not believe how much it was packing by the half-way point! Certainly a much needed contrast after Moby-Dick.

 

I loved it. It was a damned good book, and I want a hard-copy of my own.

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