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Search tags: i-laughed-with-it
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review 2018-07-10 20:44
Lots of fun
Quidditch Through the Ages - J.K. Rowling

Madam Pince, our librarian, tells me that it is “pawed about, dribbled on, and generally maltreated” nearly every day – a high compliment for any book.

 

Dumbledore's introduction set the tone.

 

I liked this one A LOT better than Strange Beasts (caveat: my digital copy didn't have the margin notes, so it lost the meta gold extra). Anyway, Bestiaries are good for curiosity, but this one was just plain entertaining. The tong in cheek tone was great, and the amount of laughters it pulled from me with the shenanigans involved in the rules creations, and the fouls mentions can't be counted. I mean:

 

The full list of these fouls, however, has never been made available to the wizarding public. It is the Department’s view that witches and wizards who see the list “might get ideas.”

 

Refereeing a Quidditch match was once a task for only the bravest witches and wizards. Zacharias Mumps tells us that a Norfolk referee called Cyprian Youdle died during a friendly match between local wizards in 1357. The originator of the curse was never caught but is believed to have been a member of the crowd.

 

That last is naturally taking "cursing the referee" to it's expected literal end, and those are just fast examples.

 

I got the edition with the History of the World Qudditch Cup and the the 2014 articles, which was just the cherry on top. Aaand also very fitting in timing *grin*

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review 2018-07-01 08:54
Fabulous
The Prince and the Dressmaker - Jen Wang

And no, I'm not being facetious, I loved this thing.

 

I loved the expressive faces (specially Frances' on-going bemused into blank ones), the colorful tone, the hilarious hijinks and of course, the over all theme of acceptance.

 

To all that, I add three awesome scenes: the devil's wench, Juliana meeting Crystallia, and the King's outfit. I hooted and laughed so much I almost fell from my chair.

 

If I got a lump in my throat from the deep love of every type involved in all of it, well...

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review 2017-12-14 02:24
In one human's lifetime
I, Robot - Isaac Asimov

Well, that ended on an eerie note. And dovetails nicely into Foundation I guess (I'm always telling myself I have to read it, and balk at the commitment). Also, extra points for... is it irony? I mean, given who (and what) are the ones having this "laying it out and guessing" chat, and who each blame, and which is in favor? O maybe it is "discomfiting" the word I'm wanting.

 

This is an excellent collection that delves into different aspects on the overarching theme of Robot/human interaction, and goes for a variety of moods too. The thread is Susan Calvin on her interview, who, in her own words

 

saw it from the beginning, when the poor robots couldn’t speak, to the end

 

(And boy, do I have feelings about that one! My great-grandma was born in 1920, saw the advent of radio, cars and cinema into sleepy little towns, TV, PC's, cell-phones, and by the time she died in 2010, chatted on Skype with her daughter)

 

I had read many of the stories before, but the arrangement lends them extra weight with it's overarching view. As for each, there is for every taste, from the heartwarming, and the harrowing, often times ridiculous, hilarious (Powell and Donovan kept reminding me of my programmer brother whenever he's at testing stage), to the heartbreaking, disturbing and, like I started, discomfiting.

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review 2017-09-30 20:12
Hah!
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd - Agatha Christie

That was awesome!

 

No wonder it caused sensation when it was published.

 

 

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review 2017-09-29 13:53
So that's why...
Murder on the Orient Express - Agatha Christie

I've always enjoyed Agatha Christie whenever I picked one of her books, though the level fluctuated somewhat. Now I know why this one is held up there with "And then there were none", and it deserves the praise.

 

The mystery is a good one: closed quarters, and it keeps getting more intricate and tangled with each chapter. This, I expected.

 

What I did not expect, was the emotional charge. I felt intrigued and amused for most of it.

Then mentions of loyalty get dropped here and there, and as it peaked at the end, it dawns: so many people, and it's the real deal.

(spoiler show)

I felt awe, kinship and compassion in the end.

 

So, yeah. Full stars.

 

“In my opinion, M. Poirot,” he said, “the first theory you put forward was the correct one"

 

 

 

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