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review 2017-05-04 19:08
Carpe Diem / Sharon Lee & Steve Miller
Carpe Diem - Steve Miller,Sharon Lee

On the run from assassins, Val Con yos'Phelium and Miri Robertson are stranded on a distant planet and must learn to trust each other if they're going to survive and learn to love each other if they're going to heal the dark wounds of their past.

 

Carpe Diem picks up where Agent of Change left off, continuing the story of Miri Robertson and Val Con yos’Phelium. There’s good action, interspersed with more character development, both of which entertained me.

Lee & Miller have created some memorable aliens—I hope at some point to get more info about the Yxtrang, the race that everyone seems to fear & dread. I love The Clutch, the giant sapient turtles who view humanity rather like Tolkien’s Ents—we are hasty, but interesting. Of them, Edger, Val Con’s friend & adopted brother, steals every scene in which he appears!

And of course, we get more insight into Liad itself and Val Can’s family, who form the nucleus of this series. I find myself intrigued by the way that family works on Liad—and how this family is definitely different. Not only have they accepted Terrans into the fold, but they seem to be more genuinely fond of one another that other Liadan families. They also seem to have a predilection for life-mating, making the whole system of contract marriage that prevails on Liad a bit difficult for them.

Actually, I can see this series as an ancestor to the urban fantasy genre that I so enjoy today—it introduces the idea that fantasy and science fiction can contain a romantic story. Plus, the whole life-mate idea seems to be a predecessor of the mate-bond found in works like Mercy Thompson or Sarah J. Maas’s Court of Thorns and Roses series.

Book 256 in my Science Fiction and Fantasy reading project. Looking forward to Plan B to get the next installment of the tale.

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text 2017-05-03 21:24
Reading progress update: I've read 32 out of 336 pages.
Carpe Diem - Steve Miller,Sharon Lee

Getting back into the action where Agent of Change left off.

 

Love this couple!  Can hardly wait for some serious reading time!

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text 2017-03-23 01:32
Diane Rose: Carpe diem - premiera 6 kwietnia 2017
Carpe diem - Diane Rose

"Carpe diem" Diane Rose premiera książki już 6 kwietnia 2017 roku. 

 

Czy warto czekać na tę książkę? TAK, a podpowiedzią niech będą moje wrażenia po nieprzespanej nocy, spędzonej na czytaniu przedpremierowym tej książki:

 

Wieczór i noc zarwana... Warto było? Hmmmm TAK. Ja prawie 43 letni facet, czytający horrory, grozę, kryminały czy dokumenty historyczne wzruszałem się czytając "Carpe diem". Ja, fan np. cyklu Universum Metro 2033 i S.T.A.L.K.E.R, potrzebowałem chusteczek...

Autorka chciała w książce przekazać ważne rzeczy i to się jej bardzo dobrze udało. Chciała poruszyć uczucia czytelników i większość czytelników książka zapewne poruszy. A zakończenie... szok... nie jeden dobry thriller nie miał takiego zakończenia.

 

Na razie tyle, więcej dowiecie się z naszej recenzji i recenzji innych czytelników.

 

 

Darek z Półki z Książkami

 
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photo 2014-10-24 16:47
Source: markarayner.com/archives/9621
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review 2014-08-13 11:06
Dead Poets Society - Tom Schulman

  

R.I.P. Robin Williams – your big heart, sense of humor and empathy will be missed tremendously. As The Laugh Factory had it: "Now make God laugh!"

 


And what will your verse be in the poem of life?

"I learned this, at least, by my experiment; that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours." (Henry David Thoreau, Walden.)

Hands up folks, how many of us discovered Thoreau after having watched this movie? Really discovered I mean, regardless whether you had known he'd existed before. How many believe they know what Thoreau was talking about in that passage about "sucking the marrow out of life," cited in the movie, even if you didn't spend the next 2+ years of your life living in a self-constructed cabin on a pond in the woods? How many bought a copy of Whitman's poems ... whatever collection? (And maybe even read more than Oh Captain! My Captain!?) How many went on to read Emerson? Frost? Or John Keats, on whose personality Robin Williams's John Keating is probably loosely based? To many people, this movie has a powerful appeal like few others and has proven inspirational far above and beyond the effect of an ordinary movie experience. And justifiedly so, despite the fact that charismatic Neil Perry (Robert Sean Leonard), one of the story's main characters, tragically falters in the pursuit of his dreams, in the wake of apparent triumph. Because although Neil's story is one of failure, ultimately this film is a celebration of the triumph of free will, independent thinking and the growth of personality; embodied in its closing scene.

Of course, lofty goals such as these are not easily achieved. Todd Anderson (Ethan Hawke) in particular, the last scene’s triumphant hero, is literally pushed to the edge of reason before he learns to overcome his inhibitions. And Thoreau warned in "Walden:" "If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; That is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them." Anyone who takes this movie's message to heart (and Thoreau's, and Whitman's, and Emerson's, Frost's and Keats's) knows that success too easily won is often no success at all, and most important accomplishments are based on focus, tenacity and hard work as much as anything else. And prudence, too – dashing Charlie Dalton (Gale Hansen) pays a terrible price for his spur-of-the-moment challenges of authority; although of course you just gotta love him for refusing to sign Keatings' indictment. "Carpe diem" – live life to its fullest, but also know what you are doing. You won't enjoy this movie if you are afraid of letting both your mind and your feelings run free.

Shot on the magnificent location of Delaware's St. Andrews Academy, "Dead Poets' Society" is visually stunning, particularly in its depiction of the amazingly beautiful scenery (where the progression of the seasons mirrors the progression of the movie's story line), and as emotionally engaging as it invites you to reexamine your position in life. Robin Williams delivers another Academy Award-worthy performance (he was nominated but unfortunately didn't win). Of course, Robin Williams will to a certain extent always be Robin Williams ... "Aladdin's" Genie, "Good Morning Vietnam's" Adrian Cronauer and "Good Will Hunting's" Professor McGuire (the 1997 role which would finally earn him his long overdue Oscar) all shimmer through in his portrayal of John Keating; and if you've ever seen him give an interview you know that the man can go from hilarious and irreverent to deeply reflective in a split second even when it's not a movie camera that's rolling. Yet, the black sheep among Welton Academy's teachers assumes as distinct and memorable a personality as any other one of Williams's film characters.

Of its many Academy Award nominations (in addition to Robin Williams's nomination for best leading actor, the movie was also nominated in the best picture, best director [Peter Weir] and best original screenplay categories), "Dead Poets' Society" ultimately only won the Oscar for Tom Schulman's script. But more importantly, it has long since won it's viewers' lasting appreciation, and for a reason. – As the Poet said: "Camerado! This is no book; Who touches this, touches a man" (Walt Whitman, So Long!), this is no movie; who watches this, watches himself!

(Original version of this review posted on ThemisAthena.info.  To mark Robin Williams's passing, also cross-posted on Leafmarks.)

Source: www.themisathena.info/movies/deadpoetssociety.html
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