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text 2014-08-01 22:57
July Wrap-Up

I read 15 books this month!  Here's the run down:

 

The Casquette Girls by Alys Arden: A young adult paranormal with vampires, but very un-Twilight like.  Review. 

 

The Devil in the Marshalsea by Antonia Hodgson: A historical mystery set in the Marshalsea gaol. Review. 

 

Echoes by Michael Bray:  The Second Book in the Whispers trilogy, horror/ thriller. Review

 

Six Million Accusers: Catching Adolf Eichman by D. Lawrence Young:  A historical documentary novel about the Mosad catching a Nazi war criminal set in post WWII. Review

 

Prisoner of the Queen by Eliza Knight:  Historical fiction set in the Tudor Court about Katherine Gray, sister to Jane Gray. Review.

 

The Bone Church by Victoria Dougherty:  A heavy historical thriller set in WWII era Prague. Review. 

 

Phantom's Dance by Lesa Howard: A modern re-telling of The Phantom of the Opera set in the ballet world. Review.

 

Changeless by Gail Carriger:   The second book in the Parasol Protectorate series, a fun steampunk, paranormal romance.  Review. 

 

Birds of the Nile by N.E. David: Contemporary, literary fiction the combined the political issues in Egypt and ornithology. Review

 

The Lost Catacomb by Shifra Hochberg:  A historical dual-time story about a lost treasure, family secrets and Vatican conspiracy. Review. 

 

Schasm and Fissure Free by Shari J. Ryan: The first two books in the Schasm series, a new adult, fantasy, psychological thriller series about a young woman who can live in her dreams. Schasm review, Fissure Review. 

 

A Triple Knot by Emma Campion: Historical Fiction about Joan of Kent, who was eventually the wife of Edward the Black Prince.  Review.

 

The House We Grew Up In by Lisa Jewell: Contemporary family drama dealing with many different issues.  Review

 

Marina by Carlos Ruiz Zafon: Young adult gothic thriller, about a young boy and girl who find themselves in an incredible adventure. Review. 

 

Wow, a great reading month!  My favorite read by far was Marina, other top reads were the Schasm series, Casquette Girls and Prisoner of the Queen.  Not so favorite read was The Bone Church.  

 

Did you enjoy any of these books or are you looking forward to reading any of these books?

 

 

 

 

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text 2014-08-01 13:35
July 2014 Reads

 

Here we are again with the monthly roundup of what  read in July. Most of them were ARC's but that should change next month and I can go to reading what I want and feel like, for a while anyways :)

All the release dates and buy links should be in the reviews of the books which I will link as always;) 

 

 

 

 

 

Never Been Kissed by Molly O'Keefe 

 

 

 

4 ½ ★

You can find my full review here

 

The Firefighter's Appeal by Elizabeth Otto

 

 

 

 

4 ½★

You can find my full review here 

 

Guilt by Degrees by Marcia Clark

 

 

 

3 ½★

You can find my review here

 

 

 

Isis, Vampires and Ghosts - Oh My! By Janis Hill

 

 

 

1 ½★

You can find my review here

 

 

Fool's Assassin by  Robin Hobb

 

 

 

3 ½ ★

You can find my review here

 

Born of Night by Sherrilyn Kenyon

 

 

 

4 ★

You can find my review here

 

Amity by Micol Ostow

 

 

 

3 ★

You can find my review here 

 

Rising Tide: Dark Innocence by Claudette Melanson

 

 

 

4 ½ ★

You can find my review here

 

Accidentally Married on Purpose by Rachel Harris 

 

 

 

4 ★

You can find my review here 

 

The Arrow by Monica McCarty 

 

 

 

3★

You can find my review here

 

The Circle by K.M. Montemayor

 

 

 

3 ★

You can find my review here

 

So I Married a Werewolf by Kristin Miller

 

 

 

4★

You can find my review here

 

Zomburbia by Adam J. Gallardo

 

 

 

4★

You can find my review here

 

Sleepy Hollow: Children of the Revolution by Keith R.A. DeCandido

 

 

 

2 ½ ★

You can find my review here

 

Bite Me, I'm Yours by Stacy McKitrick 

 

 

 

3 ½★

You can find my review here

 

Indecent Proposal by Molly O'Keefe

 

 

 

4 ½ ★

You can find my review here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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text 2014-08-01 10:04
Books Read In July
Setting the Truth Free: The Inside Story of the Bloody Sunday Justice Campaign - Julieann Campbell
Belfast Noir - Adrian McKinty,Stuart Neville
Tödliches Bayern: Kriminalfälle aus zwei Jahrhunderten (German Edition) - Robert Hültner
The Silkworm - Robert Galbraith
The Cardinal's Blades - Pierre Pevel

This months was...average. With three books that were average, one which was great and one which was boooooooooooring.

 

Next goal: Finishing Sword and Blood (basically Three Musketeer Fanfiction WITH VAMPIRES...cheesy and silly but quite nice)

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review 2014-07-31 23:15
Wonder Woman Unbound / Tim Hanley
Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World's Most Famous Heroine - Tim Hanley

This close look at Wonder Woman’s history portrays a complicated heroine who is more than just a female Superman with a golden lasso and bullet-deflecting bracelets. The original Wonder Woman was ahead of her time, advocating female superiority and the benefits of matriarchy in the 1940s. At the same time, her creator filled the comics with titillating bondage imagery, and Wonder Woman was tied up as often as she saved the world. In the 1950s, Wonder Woman begrudgingly continued her superheroic mission, wishing she could settle down with her boyfriend instead, all while continually hinting at hidden lesbian leanings. While other female characters stepped forward as women’s lib took off in the late 1960s, Wonder Woman fell backwards, losing her superpowers and flitting from man to man. Ms. magazine and Lynda Carter restored Wonder Woman’s feminist strength in the 1970s, turning her into a powerful symbol as her checkered past was quickly forgotten. Exploring this lost history adds new dimensions to the world’s most beloved female character, and Wonder Woman Unbound delves into her comic book and its spin-offs as well as the myriad motivations of her creators to showcase the peculiar journey that led to Wonder Woman’s iconic status.

 

I have hazy recollections of reading Wonder Woman comics as a kid. I'm now wishing that I had hung on to them! I'm curious as to which of three waves of stories I was mostly reading.

The original author, William Marston, was a very intriguing individual and I would be interested in reading more about him if I can track anything down. He was of the firm opinion that women were the superior gender and that women would soon be running the world. He wrote the Wonder Woman comics to prepare young men to welcome their female overlords submissively when that time arrived. He also lived in a polyamorous household (one legal wife and one common law wife and several children, all in one home) and appears to have a bit of a thing for bondage. Hence Wonder Woman and her lasso, which she seemed to end up tied up with almost as often as she bound bad guys with it.

There seem to have been a lot of forgettable comics starring Wonder Woman. There was a brief revival when she was championed by Ms. Magazine and Gloria Steinem, which was quickly over and the Amazonian heroine returned to obscurity. The TV series, which I remember somewhat better than the comics, also lifted her profile briefly.

But as the author points out, better obscurity than being treated poorly by comic writers who don't know what to do with Wonder Woman. Perhaps there will be a female writer who will take up the cause one day and write an adventure worthy of our Amazon Warrior Princess--plots that don't reduce her to Superman's love interest or portray her as desperate to marry Steve Whats-his-name.

This book is a revised thesis, and although it is very readable for a thesis, you can still see its bone structure peeking through.

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review 2014-07-31 23:12
Slow Horses / Mick Herron
Slow Horses - Mick Herron

Slough House is a dumping ground for British intelligence agents who’ve screwed up a case in any number of ways—by leaving a secret file on a train or blowing a surveillance. River Cartwright, one such “slow horse,” is bitter about his failure and about his tedious assignment transcribing cell phone conversations.

When a young man is abducted and his kidnappers threaten to broadcast his beheading live on the Internet, River sees an opportunity to redeem himself.

Is the victim who he first appears to be? And what’s the kidnappers’ connection with a disgraced journalist? As the clock ticks on the execution, River finds that everyone has his own agenda.

 

This was an excellent "it's too hot to think too hard" summer book. If you are into spy fiction, you will probably enjoy this novel.

The slow horses are the intelligence agents who have screwed up big time and have been exiled to Slough House to grind away at boring statistical tasks until they quit or die.

When River Cartwright gets a small surveillance task to perform, he actually starts paying attention to the currents flowing around him and notices a lot of details that start knitting together into a somewhat coherent whole. What he does with this information and deciding who to trust turns this into a page-turner.

No international espionage, but plenty of "this branch against that branch" sort of conflict.

Perfect for light summer reading.

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