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review 2021-07-24 21:13
The List of Things That Will Not Change
The List of Things That Will Not Change - Rebecca Stead

As I’ve grown older, I realize how my perspective has changed, especially when I read different genres and consider which character I am relating to the most. When I read Middle Grade fiction, there is still a tiny part of me that unabashedly relates to the main character, despite what my appearance would lead you to believe. In Rebecca Stead’s newest book, I am acutely aware of being a parent, and in awe of the kindness, empathy, and generosity she has given to her characters. The “list” provides a brilliant device for Bea to work through the lows and highs of divorce and new beginnings. Stead, with her sharp, moving and compelling writing, shows all of us how to approach a complicated life with grace and humor.

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review 2021-01-12 00:36
The Windermere Witness (Lake District Mystery, #1)
The Windermere Witness (The Lake District Mysteries) - Rebecca Tope

I picked this up at a used book shop during our aborted Christmas travels; having spent time in the Lake District, specifically, the towns of Windermere, Bowness, and Ableside that this story is set in, it appealed to me instantly.

 

Alas, it was no more than a drab average.  The characters didn't know what they wanted to be: the MC tells an inspector at the beginning she's moved to Windermere after her divorce, that she was childless and insisted that there were "compensations".  By the end of the book she's barely coping with the stillborn birth she had 2 years before.  Coping and repression are likely, of course, but they aren't part of of the narrative, so the reader is left with no grasp of this MC.  The Inspector is either attractive and friendly or greasy-haired and antagonistic.  The MC's mother is supposed to be a hippy, but acts more like a criminal attorney; I never once got the impression she liked her daughter.  The bride of the story is either flaky, naive and needs to be protected, or a headstrong woman who is the only one that can steer her much older husband's life.  Flip-flop.

 

The elements of the plot were interesting, but the plot itself wasn't anything special.  The motivation was pathetic and unbelievable, given the characters, and the murderer pretty obvious after about half-way.  

 

The setting was what I'd hoped for, at least.  My memories of the Lake District are still vivid, and I loved the area, so 're-visiting' it through the book kept me picking it back up.  This is the first in a series all set here, and while weak, not so bad that should I come across another one at a used book shop, I'd probably pick it up.

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review 2020-12-17 01:02
Goodbye Stranger
Goodbye Stranger - Rebecca Stead

I gave Goodbye Stranger another chance after enjoying Stead's newest book The List of Things That Will Not Change. I managed to finish it this time and there were parts that I enjoyed (Stead writes friendships very well). Overall though I just don't think it's her best work, and I still found it less enjoyable than her other books.

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review 2020-08-26 06:40
Bluninja's Review
Star Wars The Clone Wars: Stories of Light and Dark - Greg Van Eekhout,Jason Fry,Lou Anders,Yoon Ha Lee,Sarah Beth Durst,Anne Ursu,Tom Angleberger,Zoraida Córdova,Rebecca Roanhorse,Preeti Chhibber,E. Anne Convery

Children's Fiction ~

Star Wars The Clone Wars: Stories of Light and Dark

 

Review by: Bluninja29

 

Opening Thoughts:

Star Wars The Clone Wars: Stories of Light and Dark is a collection of stories based off the TV show Star Wars: The Clone Wars (2003 TV series.) It has 11 Short Stories all based off episodes from the TV show. with more view points that we didn't get to see in the show. One of the Short stories im are gonna look at is about Count Dooku.

 

Story:

Count Dooku was surprised attacked by the Republic.

 

Presentation:

I do like how these are in the characters point of view like Count Dooku. I also like how all the stories are based off the show. What I didn't like is how these are short stories, but it is a nitpick so I won't get crazy over it. I honestly liked this book.

If you are a star wars nerd or want to give your kid a star wars book to read. then this is the book for you!


4/5

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review 2020-07-16 12:29
NIght Owls and Summer Skies
Night Owls and Summer Skies - Rebecca Sullivan

The summer before Emma Lane's eighteenth birthday is the last summer she will have to return to York Beach, Maine for the court ordered two months of visitation with her mother.  Since Emma came out as gay at the age of twelve, her mother has been unaccepting of her sexuality, distant and divorced her father.  Now, Emma returns to York Beach only to be dumped at Camp Maplewood where she suffered a traumatic episode several years before throwing Emma into a depression complete with PTSD while her mother jet sets around the world with her new husband.  Emma immediately sets out to get herself thrown out of camp by breaking into the shed holding the camper's phones only to be thwarted at every attempt by counselor Vivian Black. As Emma deals with her worst fears at camp, she makes a friend in chipper, outgoing Gwen Black and a passion for cooking with Julie Black, the camp cook. Each time Emma even thinks about doing something to get herself kicked out, Vivian seems to be a step ahead, helping Emma through her fears and getting to know her well, maybe even more.

Night Owls and Summer Skies is a perfect summer romance.  I loved that Emma's character was already secure in her sexuality and that finding her sexuality was not the main point of the book, this was simply a romance.  Emma's character also had deeper issues such as her depression and PTSD which still affect her, but don't define her.  The writing brought me into Emma's head and at times I felt like I was having a panic attack along with her.  Emma's growth at camp was amazing to read through.  From dealing with bullies, making friends, finding a hobby she enjoys and learning how to trust again along with slowly recovering from her trauma from years before.  Emma and Vivian's relationship felt natural and unhurried as they simply fell into one another.  I did find it a little weird that they were counselor and camper, although they were only one year apart in age.  I do wish there was some growth for Emma's mother along with some of the other campers; however, it is Emma's story.  Overall, a fun summer romance.

This book was received for free in return for an honest review.

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