logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: The-Sixth-Extinction
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2019-03-29 10:55
2019 Reading Goals: Non-Fiction Science Reading List - Progress Report #1
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks - Rebecca Skloot
Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How It Changed the World - Laura Spinney
The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History - Elizabeth Kolbert
Code Girls: The True Story of the American Women Who Secretly Broke Codes in World War II (Young Readers Edition) - Liza Mundy
Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet - Claire L. Evans
Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars - Nathalia Holt
Upstream: Selected Essays - Mary Oliver
Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation - Dan Fagin
Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond - Sonia Shah
The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements - Sam Kean

After three busy months, a check in on my progress with this reading project:

 

Read:

1. The Disappearing Spoon by Sam Kean (Flat Book Society pick)

2. Pandemic by Sonia Shah (substitute for a DNF)

 

DNF:

1. The Genius of Birds by Jennifer Ackerman

2. The Glass Universe by Dava Sobel

 

Currently reading The Fever by Sonia Shah (about malaria). Up next is Tom's River by Dan Fagin.

 

_________________________________________________________________________

In addition to the twelve books listed in this post, I hope to read a few of the Flat Book Society picks.

 

1. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

3. Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How It Changed the World by Laura Spinney

4. Silent Spring by Rachel Carson

5. The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert

6. This Changes Everything by Naomi Klein

8. Code Girls by Liz Mundy

9. Rise of the Rocket Girls by Nathalia Holt

10. Broad Band by Claire L. Evans

11. Upstream: Selected Essays by Mary Oliver

12. Tom's River by Dan Fagin

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2019-01-01 15:28
January 2019 TBR
Three Fearful Days: San Francisco Memoirs of the 1906 Earthquake & Fire - Malcolm E. Barker
The Turning of Anne Merrick - Christine Blevins
Cheer Up Love: Adventures in depression with the Crab of Hate - Susan Calman
Mary and Lou and Rhoda and Ted: And all the Brilliant Minds Who Made The Mary Tyler Moore Show a Classic - Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
North to You - Tif Marcelo
Sweet Disorder - Rose Lerner
Ellis Island - Kate Kerrigan
A Dance with Danger (Rebels and Lovers) - Jeannie Lin
The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History - Elizabeth Kolbert
The Last of the President's Men - Bob Woodward

Image result for january

Happy 2019!

 

From my physical non-fiction shelf - Three Fearful Days: San Francisco Memoirs of the 1906 Earthquake and Fire by Malcolm E. Barker

 

From my physical fiction shelf - The Turning of Anne Merrick by Christine Blevins. 

 

From my Winter COYER/BoB cycle 24 reading list - Cheer Up, Love by Susan Calman; Mary & Lou and Ted & Rhoda by Jennifer Armstrong; North to You by Tif Marcelo; Sweet Disorder by Rose Lerner; Ellis Island by Kate Kerrigan.

 

From 24 Festive Task game: A Dance with Danger by Jeannie Lin, my pick for first book of 2019.

 

From my Science reading list - The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert.

 

From my Nixon reading list - The Last of the President's Men by Bob Woodward.

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-10-23 15:03
Glowing Fish & Bucketfuls of Spider Silk in Goat Milk, Frankenstein’s Cat by Emily Anthes Showcases Some of the Wonders of the Biotechnological World While also Raising Some Important Questions!
Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech's Brave New Beasts - Emily Anthes

 

 

 

The penultimate installment in Project Frankenstein was a joy to read. It was relatively short and full of stuff that I find interesting. I am dividing this review into three parts:

 

1. Here is a Snippet from the book:

 

 

2. Then there were these Sciency Bits that I enjoyed ruminating upon:

Cloning other adult mammals reinforced the discovery that nuclear transfer can reset genes contained in specialized cells back to their embryonic state.

It meant that the genetic clock could supposedly be turned back if things didn’t go so well the first time!

It is my content that the northern grasslands would have remained viable…had the great herds of Pleistocene animals remained in place to maintain the landscape.

This occurred to me for the first time. Yes, the Ice Ages may have changed the landscape physically but it also caused the extinction of the grazers and caused changes in a roundabout way.

…(tuna) are warm-blooded, which makes them oddities in the fish world but keeps them toasty…

They are what?! Why are you doing this to me world? I was so happy, thinking all fish are cold-blooded but no! I hate nature!

International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT)

While The Sixth Extinction left me without hope, this book helped me see that we aren’t all bad eggs. Yes, humans have brought the onset of Anthropocene and change environment wherever they go…

We have harvested so many of these large deer, elk, and sheep over the centuries that many species have evolved smaller body and horn sizes. Similarly, fish have adapted to human harvesting by developing thinner bodies capable of sneaking out of nets.

Yet, organizations like ICCAT are keeping track of the number of bluefin tuna that are being pulled out of water annually. The Integrated Ocean Observing System is tagging elephant seals and other swimmers to gather information about the marine environment. Then there is Ocean Tracking Network that has been busy installing underwater listening stations that will pick up on tagged animals. The list of scientists and researchers trying to collect information goes on and on. There is even an attempt to engage the public and increase awareness via animal Facebook profiles. The point is, it took us decades if not more to wreck things. We will need some time to put them back together and it is a pity if nature doesn’t grant us that respite.

 

3. And a Franken-Bit that I shook an admonitory finger at:

The manufacturers of AquAdvantage salmon think that by producing only sterile female fish, they can keep them from reproducing or passing along their genes.

 

 

Even though the book raises pertinent questions about whether animals can incur psychological damage from being tagged, it doesn’t answer them. To be fair, most of us won’t be able to say no to a drug, if it would save a loved one, even if one or two clauses of animal rights weren’t observed!

 

Could you?

 

Image

 

Originally published at midureads.wordpress.com on October 23, 2017.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-07-13 19:54
BT's Science Shortlist
The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements - Sam Kean
Life in a Shell: A Physiologist's View of a Turtle - Donald C. Jackson
Darwin's Ghosts: The Secret History of Evolution - Rebecca Stott
The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History - Elizabeth Kolbert
How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction - Beth J. Shapiro
Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong—and the New Research That's Rewriting the Story - Angela Saini
Get Well Soon: History's Worst Plagues and the Heroes Who Fought Them - Jennifer Wright
Forensics: The Anatomy of Crime - Val McDermid
Human Universe by Professor Brian Cox (7-May-2015) Paperback - Professor Brian Cox
Opening Skinner's Box: Great Psychological Experiments Of The 20th Century - Lauren Slater

Inspired by the posts my fellow future potential Science Reading Buddies, I've browsed my shelves, my tbr, and library catalogues for Science-related books that looked interesting.

And when I say inspired, I mean I stole lots of books off those lists also. ;)

 

There are lots and lots of other books I would like to read, but I needed to narrow down a short list.

 

Also, I have created a shelf for the long-list and science books I have read.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-07-13 19:00
Nonfiction Science Book Club: My Suggestions
The Demon Under the Microscope: From Battlefield Hospitals to Nazi Labs, One Doctor's Heroic Search for the World's First Miracle Drug - Thomas Hager
The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History - Elizabeth Kolbert
Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal - Mary Roach
The Soul of an Octopus: A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder of Consciousness - Sy Montgomery
The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate—Discoveries From a Secret World - Peter Wohlleben
Adventures in Human Being (Wellcome) - Gavin Francis
Storm in a Teacup: The Physics of Everyday Life - Helen Czerski
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind - Yuval Noah Harari
The Genius of Birds - Jennifer Ackerman
Herding Hemingway's Cats: Understanding how our genes work - Kat Arney

Just my two cents :). I´m really looking forward to be reading some more non-fiction.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?