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text 2017-07-21 22:25
Go Wild!
The Extinction Club - Jeffrey Moore

This was my first experience of work by Canadian author, Jeffrey Moore and perhaps to the author's credit 'The Extinction Club" isn't easily pidgeon-holed. It's certainly thrilling, but there are also elements of brutal crime, a key character (Celeste) is a teenager, but it's not really a 'young adult' novel, at one point crumbs even seemed to be leading down the path of a ghost/monster story, but no. What does stand out is the use of the book as a brash exposé of the abject capacity of man for cruelty and the depraved abuse of wild animals, as well as their own kind. Designed to be hard-hitting, in parts the book adopts the tenor of a documentary and yet the tension builds from the classic clash of good and evil.

 

Nile Nightingale is an unlikely hero. Hiding out in the Laurentian mountains of Quebec, from a series of stateside misdemeanors and a litigious ex-partner with designs on his inheritance, the recovering alcoholic is in poor shape. However, when he rescues a discarded burlap sack from sinking into marshland, he discovers inside 14 year-old Celeste, beaten and stabbed. Both damaged by their respective experiences. Nile and Celeste contrive to rehabilitate each other and rediscover the spirit to not be cowed, but rather to find the courage to stand up for what it right.

 

For Nile especially, the adventure smacks of a chance for redemption, but brimming with challenge, the temptation to take the path of least resistance is palpable. In describing the burgeoning connection of the main characters the book is also touching and ultimately demonstrates that humankind is simultaneously capable of great virtue and altruism, which can set the species apart.

 

Thus, by casting a light on the dichotomy between the hunted and the hunters, Moore alludes to the possibility that the abuse of power is the greatest weakness of all. Still, for all the uncompromising wildlife protection zeal, Moore's inclusion of wacky cameos, such as Welshman Myles Llewellyn, at least confers a little lightness to the barbarous gloom. Bore da! 

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review 2017-05-05 20:23
An amazing book!
The White Mountains - John Christopher

This book was amazing! It was a book I personally enjoyed. This is a book I would recommend teachers to use for reading or English class! This is a great YA book!

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review 2017-01-15 00:00
And the Mountains Echoed
And the Mountains Echoed - Khaled Hosseini And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini

I liked this book but I found it a little difficult to follow all the characters at times. Hosseini weaves a complicated fabric of the past and present and how each life has progressed. I would have liked to have known more about the lives of some of the main characters and the one fault of the book is that it seems to jump around a lot from times and places and leaves you somewhat dissatisfied and wanting to know more.
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review SPOILER ALERT! 2016-11-29 19:29
And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini
And the Mountains Echoed - Khaled Hosseini

This is Hosseini's third novel, his weakest so far.

 

The story begins with the separation of the siblings Abdullah and Pari when Pari is sold to a childless rich couple in Kabul. What follows is a collection of short stories of people who are sometimes closely, sometimes loosely connected to that event, stories of love, of friendship, of blurred lines between these two, of family, of failure, of how people deal with loss, sickness, disfigurement in their own ways. And of how loved ones might not turn out to be whom you thought them to be.

 

"Sometimes a finger must be cut to save the hand."

 

Again, Hosseini manages to weave a tapestry with his words, especially the first story of about 50 pages, and the stories and allegories which are turned into reality within that one, showcase his tremendous abilities as a writer. But as much as the main story arc comes together in the end, there are unfortunately parts that remain apart, that don't mesh with the others... well, that don't quite fit right into this tapestry. Maybe it's the various changes in story-telling, maybe it's the way people are included who don't actually feature in the main plot, but in my opinion 2 or 3 of those short stories could have been cut without damaging the overall arc.

 

Even though this novel didn't grip me as much as his 2 previous ones - although, make no mistake, some stories, the first one, Nabi's and of course the bittersweet ending, again an allegory in itself about the blessing and the curse of forgetting, of letting go and of holding on, again brought a lump to my throat if not outright tears to my eyes -, I'm still in awe of Hosseini's talent and definitely on the lookout for his next book.

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text 2016-11-15 17:05
Ice Ice Baby

All the books that used to cover my floor and walls in my salad days were about climbing. I knew the stories of nearly every expedition to the Himalayas, the Andes. and the Alps, and lived them.

 

I loved the mountains, and still do. I loved trekking, but was a terrible climber. Ice was always the hardest, and the easiest: hardest physically but easiest in technique. And frozen waterfalls were always a dramatic challenge. A frozen waterfall represents a mountain in winter, and aside from the physical effort, one had to make sure the ice was not all going to come tumbling down. Thrilling.

 

meditation

is best not done crosslegged

on a carpet

step upwards on frozen time

until you no longer feel gravity

 

 

Source: chevrefeuillescarpediem.blogspot.com
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