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review 2018-07-06 10:00
Herbal Formularies for Health Professionals Vol. 2
Herbal Formularies for Health Professionals, Volume 2 - Jill Stansbury

by Dr. Jill Stansbury, ND

 

This is the second of a five volume set of herbal formularies, this one focusing on respiration and circulation. It starts with an introduction about honoring traditional knowledge, remembering that modern pharmacology came out of folkloric herbal medicine and most medicines are still refined from the same plants our ancestors used in raw form.

 

The book is well presented and reads like a serious book on medicine rather than the sort of airy-fairy new age stuff you often see about herbalism. There are three chapters within 184 pages of fascinating information, partially laid out in encyclopedic form. The first chapter is The Art of Herbal Formulation. This covers diagnosis, symptoms, and basically how to determine what herbs to use for a problem.

 

There is preventative advice like how to support vitality instead of opposing disease. The second chapter goes into creating formulas for the circulatory system. This includes what nutrients will support various biological processes and parts of the system. Some of the information like using cardio glycosides makes me think that a doctor's advice would be needed rather than self-treatment, but as a reference volume for someone in the medical profession it would be brilliant.

 

The drawing of various herbal plants add visual interest and are very well done. A lot of the herbal names are full Latin rather than common names, though the common names are included in the encyclopedic lists, so this is a book for serious study. Even if it gives me mental images of shelves lined with arcane bottles and a wisened old man with a long beard as apothocary!

 

The third chapter is on formulas for respiratory conditions. Like the second chapter, it explains the processes and follows with an encyclopedic list of relevant herbs. There is an appendix to compare scientific names to common names followed by another one to translate the common names to the Latin, then a glossary of therapeutic terms.

 

Unlike a lot of reference books, I think this one would be worth reading all through to familiarize the reader with the material, after which it would sit well on the shelf of a medical reference library. Someone with a formal medical education would probably already be familiar with most of the terms, but I found it all rather interesting.

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photo 2018-04-26 13:30
Books on Alternative medicine for careers by Malini Chaudhri
Sports Massage

http://malinichaudhri.wordpress.com

 

The author has retired two titles on Amazon in favor of Library sales only. The range of her books is exclusively to support careers.

 

The new era of the internet shows libraries to be the focal point of change management, and the platform for new development, exploration and awareness.

 

These books have been submitted to libraries foir review and will put a perspective on global standardized education of Occupational Standards.

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review 2018-03-15 16:53
A psychologically astute book that will make you think about your own mortality. And what an ending!
The Healer - Christoph Fischer

I have read and reviewed a couple of the author’s books in the past and enjoyed them, and I was intrigued by this book when it came out, but due to my personal circumstances (my father suffered from cancer and died around the time of its publication) I didn’t feel I was in the best frame of mind for it. Now that it has been published as part of The Fraud and Miracle Trilogy, I was very pleased to receive a paperback copy and finally get to read it.

The story is deceptively simple. A woman suffering from terminal pancreatic cancer, desperate, follows the advice of her personal assistant and approaches a healer, Arpan. I am not sure if he would call himself a “faith” healer, but he insists that those he treats should be totally invested in the process, including transferring 50% of their assets to his account. Although he states all that money goes to charity, it caused suspicion and scandal years back, and he has been keeping a low profile ever since. After much insistence and a different deal, he agrees to treat Erica, who also has secrets of her own. There are strange conspiracies surrounding Arpan and his healing process but Erica’s life is changed forever. Things are not as they seem, of course.

The story is written in the third person from Erica’s point of view, and we get to share in her doubts, suspicions, paranoia, hope, and also to experience the healing with her. The book transmits a sense of claustrophobia, and although there are treks around the Welsh countryside and later we move to a different country, most of the story takes place within Arpan’s tent, and there are only a few main characters (mostly Erica (Maria), Arpan (Amesh), and Anuj) with some secondary characters that we don’t get to know very well (Hilda, Julia, Gunnar). There are no lengthy descriptions of settings or of the appearance of the characters, because we follow the point of view of a woman totally preoccupied with her health and her mortality, and that makes her not the most reliable of narrators. She describes the physical and mental effects that the illness and the healing process have on her, and we are also privy to her suspicions and doubts. The book offers fascinating psychological insights into how much our “rational” point of view can change when our life is at stake, and it is impossible to read it and not wonder what we would do in Erica’s place.

I kept thinking that the story, which relies heavily on dialogue (both between characters and also internal dialogue), would make a great play, and its intensity would be well suited to the stage. Although most of the characters are not sympathetic, to begin with, their humanity and the big questions they are forced to deal with make them intriguing and worthy subjects of our observations.

The ending brings a great twist to the story. Although I think most readers will have been suspicious and on alert due to the secrets, false information, continuous doubts, and different versions of the truth on offer, the actual ending will make them question everything and re-evaluate the story in a different light. And, considering the nature of the subject it deals with, that is a great achievement.

I recommend it to those who enjoy stories that make them think, to readers who are not searching for cheap thrills and prefer a psychologically astute book and especially to those who want to feel personally invested in the stories they read. I look forward to the rest of the books in the trilogy.

 

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review 2017-09-28 16:18
Cannabis Extracts In Medicine by #JeffreyDach, #ElaineA.Moore, #JustinKander
Cannabis Extracts in Medicine: The Promise of Benefits in Seizure Disorders, Cancer and Other Conditions (Mcfarland Health Topics) - Jeffrey Dach M.D.,Justin Kander,Elaine A. Moore

Cannabis Extracts in Medicine

 

There is a huge controversy over Marijuana and its byproducts, but I think it is time to put aside the political agendas and see this as just another medication that can improve peoples lives.

 

A little education can go a long way.

 

Cannabis Extracts in Medicine: The Promise of Benefits in Seizure Disorders, Cancer and Other Conditions (McFarland Health Topics)

Amazon US  /  Amazon UK  /  Amazon CA  /  Goodreads

 

MY REVIEW

 

BEFORE you condemn it, learn about it.

 

I know this is a controversial subject, but there are so many reasons to rethink the illegality of marijuana.

 

It is not all about getting high, but, also, feeling better, being able to lead a productive life for young and old alike.

 

The illegality of marijuana came about in the 30’s. What drove it? Dupont, greed and politics?

 

Reading Cannabis was an education for me, not only in the drug, marijuana, itself, but all the things surrounding it. The political ramifications, the cost to victims lives when they are imprisoned, and the loss of their possessions through asset forfeiture. I mean, we don’t treat a murderer this badly.

 

So many diseases and ailments can be treated with marijuana, without the debilitating side affects of many legal pharmaceuticals…epilepsy, seizures, anxiety, bipolar, pain, cancer, parkinsons, and some major central nervous system disorders…insomnia, schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis, diabetes and inflammation and inflammatory diseases.

The growing of marijuana is the same as creating legal pharmaceuticals, they are developed. You don’t just throw a seed in the ground, give it some water, light and fertilizer and voila. It is complicated and costly, but, in my book, something we need to consider.

 

Have you had someone you love, or yourself, in torturous, overwhelming pain, anxiety that paralyzes you, a terminal illness that legal drugs make any kind of life impossible, , even though you are sitting beside the person, they are so drugged they don’t even know you are there?

 

What is wrong with giving people all the options that are out there? Don’t you want to make your own choices, when your health and quality of life is on the line?

 

At the end of each chapter of the books is a wonderful, simplistic summary of the chapter that makes things easy to understand.

 

I would recommend this book to EVERYONE.

 

I voluntarily reviewed a free copy of Cannabis Extracts In Medicine by Jeffrey Dach, MD.

Animated Animals. Pictures, Images and Photos 5 Stars

 

Read more here.

 
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Source: www.fundinmental.com/cannabis-extracts-in-medicine-by-jeffreydach-elainea-moore-justinkander
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text 2016-03-28 08:47
The Peterson Group: Is Acupuncture Really Effective For Children?
As one of the entities in the world that support alternative medicines, The Peterson Group CAM and Integrative Medicines is convinced that acupuncture is safe for children. It even considers the practice as an effective method to treat chronic pain as well as other illnesses and diseases.

It's evident that there are several study findings regarding this particular traditional Chinese medicine, some of it proved its effectiveness, others don’t. Modern American acupuncturists have been through strict training, safety standards and certifications before becoming licensed, making them trustworthy and reliable individuals. Unqualified practitioners are often the reason why some studies suggest that acupuncture is not really effective and safe for children.

On the other hand, The Peterson Group strongly believes that qualified practitioners can provide effective treatment for children using acupuncture. It is considered safe because of some factors, such as infections from acupuncture needles are particularly rare because only single-use sterile disposable needles are being used in this practice.

As a parent, you're may be thinking that the needles can pierce through the lungs or other vital organs of your child, but you're thinking it wrong because the needles are hair-fine, virtually painless, and are inserted superficially into the skin. But if you can't help but get worried about the needles, there are also other painless methods used to stimulate the acupuncture points without using any needles but have similar therapeutic effects as acupuncture. Those kind of methods will not have any pernicious effect on the body since they do not penetrate the skin.

Experts are also using a non-needle method to children afraid of needles. In particular, this method is commonly used for babies and toddlers to stimulate acupuncture points. Acupuncture needles are not retained in the body for children under age 8, they are swiftly tapped in and immediately taken out. Advise your children to stay still for a couple of seconds at a time during the treatment. But for children over age 8, the needles are maintained in the body for 10 to 20 minutes while the child is sitting still. In order to avoid any dangerous effect on the child, the needles are made smaller and are inserted superficially to the skin.

During the insertion of the needle, children might feel a brief feeling of discomfort for almost 1-2 seconds, which is not a big deal so there's absolutely nothing to worry about. Because of the special techniques used in pediatrics, mild harmful effects such as temporary bruising or swelling at the needle site rarely happen. The Peterson Group wants you to make sure that the practitioner you choose is licensed and has special training in pediatrics.
Source: tpgwellness.com
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