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review 2018-04-21 10:20
Review: The Friend by Teresa Driscoll
The Friend: An emotional psychological thriller with a twist - Teresa O'Driscoll

Published by: Thomas & Mercer  (22nd March 2018)

 

ISBN: 978-1542046664

 

Rating: 5*

 

Source: Netgalley 

 

Synopsis: 

On a train with her husband, miles from home and their four-year-old son, Ben, Sophie receives a chilling phone call. Two boys are in hospital after a tragic accident. One of them is Ben.

She thought she could trust Emma, her new friend, to look after her little boy. After all, Emma’s a kindred spirit—someone Sophie was sure she could bare her soul to, despite the village rumours. But Sophie can’t shake the feeling that she’s made an unforgivable mistake and now her whole family is in danger.

Because how well does she know Emma, really? Should she have trusted her at all?

Time is running out. Powerless to help her child, still hours from home, Sophie is about to discover the truth. And her life will never be the same.

 

Review:

Wow! Teresa Driscoll must have magic fingers to weave such an enticing, gripping tale. It is obvious that the story has been clearly and precisely thought out, and the book is intelligently written, with more twists and turns than your average rollercoaster. I read it in one sitting, furiously devouring each page, unable to rest until I'd reached the end and discovered the fate of the boys in the hospital. 

 

The story alternates between the present day Sophie, on the train, rushing towards the hospital, and the Sophie from the past, recounting the day she met Emma and how their friendship grew. I didn't find this, or the switch between narratives, distracting, I notice other reviewers have mentioned there being a lot of back story, but I feel that is the main part of this chilling tale, after all it's about The Friend.

 

I think immediately after reading this, everyone is likely to be rather less trusting of people they meet and seem to have an affinity with! I do wonder where the author got the idea...

I can't wait to see what Teresa Driscoll comes up with next! 

I received an ARC of this book from the publisher via Netgalley. This is my unbiased review.

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review 2018-04-06 14:40
Clod Makes a Friend by David J. Pedersen
Clod Makes a Friend - David J. Pedersen

Clod is poor, he's different from others in many ways, but mostly he is lonely. In a world where everyone but Clod has some form of magic, he is constantly bullied and has no friends. The biggest bully being his teacher Learned Yugen.



Clod has no one to play with, and the only thing he has to play with is bits of clay his mother brings him occasionally. One day Clod molds his clay into the shape of a little girl and brings her to life, she calls herself Ada. As time goes on Clod keeps reinventing Ada and reawakening her. Ada gets Clod into all kinds of trouble, but Clod doesn't care he finally has a friend. 



The book follows Clod's life up to age 57. Each chapter showing a Clod at a different age, it also tells the tells the trouble Ada gets him into. Like stealing a cake in the town of Durgoon because Ada wants to taste cake. 



As the years go on, not only does Clod keep bringing Ada to life but he also revives others who have died. He brings a poor little dog who has been trampled by a horse so his owner can say goodbye. He can bring back people as well but only for short periods of time. He is deemed as evil for his gift. 



This book actually has a few different morals for readers but does it in a subtle way. I enjoyed this book myself and know that children I would say from age 8 to probably 13 would enjoy it as well.

 

I was given this book by the Author as part of a book tour for iRead Book Tours. My review is my own thoughts. 

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text 2018-03-13 17:43
Friendship...[3/13/18]
Today I am thankful for friendship and the love of a true friend.
 
There is so much I could say, but I don't want to get too personal on this one. I could get pretty mushy. We don't talk that often, and that is okay. I have my reasons. You have yours. We understand that. We've come a long way and have had our ups and downs, we are 100% truly best friends. I am thankful and I love you.
 
A true friend can go years without talking and start back up as if no time has passed.
 
Meow... >^.^<
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review 2018-03-03 15:43
Her Best Friend - Sarah Wray Her Best Friend - Sarah Wray

Teenagers, Sylvie and Victoria are best friends until tragedy strikes and Victoria is murdered. No one is ever charged with the crime. Twenty years later Sylvie is back in her hometown to sort out her mother’s affairs after her death - it isn’t a happy homecoming. A very slow burner with characters it’s hard to find a connection with. Sylvie is wishy washy now as she was twenty years ago when she was 15, always a follower, never the leader. There are descriptions of mundane activities, one or two surprises, enough to keep on reading. A great sounding book which didn’t quite hit the spot for me this time.

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review 2018-02-28 19:23
Jeffrey Dahmer: The Early Years
My Friend Dahmer - Derf Backderf

My Friend Dahmer by Derf Backderf is a graphic novel which was used as the basis for the documentary film of the same name which came out in 2017. This is the account of Jeffrey "Jeff" Dahmer during his adolescence in Ohio from the point-of-view of his friend, Derf. [A/N: I would say "friend" is pushing it as it was frequently noted throughout the book that while a group of boys dubbed themselves The Dahmer Fan Club and imitated him/quoted him on multiple occasions Jeff was rarely (if ever) asked to hang out with them.] Derf talks about Jeff's home life which was as you'd expect: turbulent and troubling. His parents had an argumentative, unhealthy relationship and his mother in particular monopolized much of the attention in the home making it possible for Jeff's habits to remain under the radar. Jeff was an alcoholic from a very early age and somehow this went  unnoticed by the adults in his life including his teachers. However, Derf says that it was common knowledge among the kids at school that he was often drunk in class and looking back it was most likely a coping mechanism against his darker impulses. Besides his unhappy home life, he was struggling with his sexuality as a gay man and his sexual fantasies which revolved around having total (i.e. sexual) control over male corpses. He managed to keep this urge in check by murdering animals, skinning them, and keeping their bones in a shed behind his house. And yet no one had any idea this was happening. Hindsight is 20/20 and Derf seems to employ this readily when explaining that he and the other boys in the Dahmer Fan Club "knew" something wasn't right with Jeff which is why they often didn't invite him to be a part of their group activities. His parents were too caught up in their imploding marriage and his teachers seemed to have turned a blind eye even when he imitated people having epileptic fits to comic effect in their classrooms. (This bothered me a lot by the way.) 

 

I found the informative background knowledge on a serial killer that I knew little about quite interesting but the artwork (remember this is a graphic novel) was not my cup of tea. It was the faces which I really didn't like. Perhaps that was artistic license since Dahmer tended to dehumanize his victims. I just know that it brought me out of the narrative more often than not. I'll give it a 7/10 overall because it was almost too unbelievable to be true. If you enjoy true crime and find the evolution of serial killers to be fascinating then you'd be remiss not to check this one out.

 

The fits. [Source: American Book Center]

 

What's Up Next: Mine Own Executioner by Nigel Balchin

 

What I'm Currently Reading: From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death by Caitlin Doughty

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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