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Search tags: Second-Chance
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review 2018-04-18 19:10
A Matter of Chance: A Novel - Julie Maloney
When Maddy's daughter disappears, She gets, of course, a little maniacal. Desperate to find her missing daughter, she does some crazy things. She's hell bent on a mission and I don't blame her. However, she does do a lot of dumb stuff, desperate in her search.

I found this to be a decent read. There were times when I felt that the story bogged down a little, but just as fast, the action would pick right back up. 

In the end, I was glad that I got to read this book as I sped through it reading it all in one sitting.

Thanks to She Writes Press and Net Galley for providing me with a free e-galley in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.

 

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review 2018-04-15 23:32
One True Love, Barbara Freethy
One True Love - Barbara Freethy

I found this romance a little hard to get into but once I did, I enjoyed it. I received this book for free and voluntarily chose to review. I've given this a 4* rating. This story was woven around two women, who grew up friends and are reconnected in this story. There is a lot of woundedness in these characters and a lot of healing too.There are several twists and turns along the way. A real interesting ending.

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review 2018-04-12 12:36
Women's Murder Club Book 2
2nd chance - Andrew Gross,James Patterson

When I originally read this book, I loved it. This time, I just wasn't able to get into the book and enjoy the women and the coming together to solve the crime using their expertise. A homicide detective, a coroner, an assistant DA and the crime beat reporter. This time, I just couldn't get into the story. I think it is time to go back to the fluff reading (aka cozy mysteries). 

 

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review 2018-04-02 20:04
Bad Neighbors - Maia Chance

 

 

 

Bad Neighbors is the second installment in the Agnes and Effie Mystery series.  The story takes place in fictional Naneda, New York.  A town filled with quirky neighbors and every knows your name.  

 

Agnes and her kooky great aunt Effie are restoring their family bed and breakfast the Stagecoach Inn.  It's leaf-peeping season In Naneda, the tourists will be arriving soon and the Stagecoach Inn needs a major overhaul.  When Effie gets a phone call that a bus carrying seniors has broke down and the seniors need a place to stay until repairs are made she accommodates them at the inn.  Upon Agnes's and Effie's arrival they learn Agnes's new boyfriend, Otis is in police custody for the dead body found at his auto repair shop.  Agnes knows Otis is innocent and it's up to her and Effie to prove his innocence.

 

Plenty of humor and comical characters made this cozy mystery an enjoyable read.  Aunt Effie is that one aunt in every family....swanky, funny, witty, bizarre, full of life. The seniors' high-spirited and lively characterizations reminded me of the roles played in the movie, Cocoon.  Some of the neighbors would never be invited over for coffee.

 

As the mystery unfolds and I put two and two together, Chance cleverly steers the mystery in another direction without missing a beat.

 

Bad Neighbors by Maia Chance was a delight to read.  I'm looking forward to reading more books by this author.

 

Thank you Netgalley and Crooked Lane Books for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.

 

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review 2018-03-22 17:01
A book about con-games that will trap readers and make them question everything.
The Gamblers - Christoph Fischer, Wanda Hartzenberg,David Lawlor

This is the second book I read in the Fraud and Miracle trilogy, and its inclusion there is sure to put readers on their guard. But that is the beauty of it. You know something is going on, and you might even suspect what (although not, perhaps, in detail) but you can’t help but eagerly keep reading and follow the story, enmeshed in the same web of illusion and deceit that traps the main character, Ben.

The story is written in the third person and follows the point of view of Ben, the protagonist. He is a somewhat socially awkward young accountant who leads a modest life in London, who is not precisely streetwise, and who feels more at ease playing games in online communities than interacting socially in person. He is obsessed with numbers (in real life, I wondered if somebody with similar personality traits might fit into the very mild range of autistic spectrum disorder. He acknowledges that he is bad at reading people’s emotions and expressions, he is anxious in social situations and functions by imitating other people’s behaviour, he displays obsessive personality traits…) and does not believe in luck and chance. He is convinced that random events (like lottery or games of chance results) follow a pattern and he is determined to find it. He gets a bit lottery win (£64 million), and although he does not value money per se (at least at the beginning of the story), he decides to treat himself travelling to New York. Everything seems to change from that moment on, he makes a new friend (the glamorous and charming Mirco) and meets the girl of his dreams, Wendy.

The third person point of view suits the story perfectly. On the one hand, we follow Ben’s point of view and his thought processes. We are aware of his misgivings and doubts. He does not believe in luck, after all, and he cannot accept that all these good things are happening to him, especially as they seem to coincide with his lottery win. At the same time, the third person gives us enough distance to observe and judge Ben’s own behaviour (that does not always fit his self-proclaimed intentions and opinions) and also that of those around him. There are things that seem too good to be true, there are warnings offered by random people, there are strange behaviours (both, Mirco and Wendy, blow hot and cold at times), and there are the suspiciousness and rivalry between his new friends. We warm up to his naiveté and to his child-like wonder and enjoyment at the fabulous new life that falls on his lap, but we cannot help but chide him at times for being so easy to manipulate.  

The author reflects perfectly the process Ben goes through in his reading. Mirco keeps telling him that he should forget about methods and just “feel” the game, and despite his attachment to his theories, there is something in him that desperately wants to believe in miracles, in good luck, and, most of all, wants to believe that he deserves everything he gets: the money, the friendship, and the love. This is a book about con artists and the book implements their technique to perfection. Con-games are a big favourite of mine, and I love how well the book is designed, and how it treats its readers to a peep behind the scenes of the big players, while at the same time making them play the part of the victim. Yes, we might be shouting at Ben and telling him not to be so gullible, but what would we do in his place? Wouldn’t we just want it to be true too?

The story takes place in glamorous locations and it revolves around the world of high-stakes gambling, night-clubs, and big spenders. It might be particularly interesting to those who love casinos and betting, but that is only one aspect of the book. It can be read independently from the first book in the series, and although there are tense and emotionally difficult moments, there are no violence or extreme behaviours. And the ending… You might be more or less surprised by the big reveal, but the actual ending is likely to leave you with a smile on your face.

A book that will make you question yourself and that will keep you guessing until the end. A fun read for lovers of con-games and those who always wondered what they would do if their luck suddenly changed. I’m looking forward to the third book in the trilogy.

 

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