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text 2017-03-13 07:00
Book Blitz and Giveaway for Anarchy Missing by JA Huss

Anarchy Missing
J.A. Huss
(SuperAlpha, #2)
Publication date: March 6th 2017
Genres: Adult, Fantasy, Romance

#SupervillainsFallInLove
Everyone wants justice.
That’s what Assistant DA, Lulu Lightly, tells me. “Cathedral City needs you to set things right,” she says. “To rid this place of corruption, once and for all.”
I’d like to rid Lulu Lightly of her clothes. And maybe her moral superiority. But mostly her clothes.
“I want you to fight the good fight with me,” she says.
Hell, yeah. I’m always up for a fight.
“We should stand up and be the voice of the people,” she says.
Sure, I hear voices. Sometimes I even listen to them.
“Figure out what’s good for the City and put it first,” she says.
Oh, honey… what’s good for the City is bad for the people. Trust me, I know. I’m Case Reider—insane Alpha, nefarious inventor, and I understand this town better than anyone.
Cathedral City needs me all right. Just not the way you think.
I’m not the justice you’re looking for, Lulu Lightly.
I’m still the same villain you left behind.
Only now… there’s something very, very wrong with me.
EXCERPT:
“What?” I ask. “What is it, Randy? Tell me what’s going on.”
He takes one last photo out of the folder and pushes it towards me. “You’re here because of him.”
I almost stop breathing.
Case Reider.
The one boy I desperately didn’t want to leave behind when my father moved us out to Wolf Valley seven years ago.
“Yes,” I whisper. “I know him.”
“I know you know him,” Randy says softly. He places a hand on mine just as Lisa appears with another cup of coffee.
I take it from her, muttering some thanks, and then take a long, long sip before coming up for air and letting it out in a sigh.
“He was your escort for the Debutante Ball.”
“How do you know that?” I ask.
“I was there that night.” He smiles sheepishly. “Someone else’s date, obviously. I saw you with him.”
“I haven’t seen him in forever.”
Randy waves a hand in the air. “Doesn’t matter. We’re not after him.”
I feel so relieved.
“Not yet.”
My relief disappears.
“We know for a fact that Lincoln Wade is a black-hat hacker, Lulu. And Detective Molly Masters has been dating him since she came to town. But the real problem is… Lincoln Wade and Case Reider have been best friends since childhood. Do you remember those two boys who went missing twenty years ago, without a trace, then reappeared several years later with no explanation?”
“Oh, Jesus.”
“Yup,” Randy says. “Those two boys were Case and Lincoln. We think Brooks was involved somehow, but we’re not sure where they intersect. They are close now, at any rate. Lulu,” Randy says, leaning across his desk to take both my hands in his. “We need Case Reider to get to Lincoln Wade and Molly Masters, and we need you to get him for us.”


Author Bio:
JA Huss is the USA Today bestselling author of more than twenty romances. She likes stories about family, loyalty, and extraordinary characters who struggle with basic human emotions while dealing with bigger than life problems. JA loves writing heroes who make you swoon, heroines who makes you jealous, and the perfect Happily Ever After ending.
You can chat with her on Facebook (www.facebook.com/AuthorJAHuss), Twitter (@jahuss), and her blog, New Adult Addiction (www.jahuss.com).
If you’re interested in getting your hands on an advanced release copy of her upcoming books, sneak peek teasers, or information on her upcoming personal appearances, you can join her newsletter list (http://eepurl.com/JVhAr) and get those details delivered right to your inbox.

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review 2017-02-05 14:37
Culture and Anarchy
Culture and Anarchy - Jane Garnett,Matthew Arnold

But what is greatness?— culture makes us ask. Greatness is a spiritual condition worthy to excite love, interest, and admiration; and the outward proof of possessing greatness is that we excite love, interest, and admiration.

Matthew Arnold's Culture and Anarchy was an odd book to come back to in these times of so much talk about making  things "great" again. I had first read the book way back when I was at university. Back then, I read the book with the purpose of finding arguments for and against different aspects of "culture" and whatever that meant, but I never got the time to read what Arnold actually had to say beyond his eternal buzzwords of "sweetness and light", both which are still as vague as ever. 

 

Having revisited with Arnold over the past couple of weeks, the best I can say is that I am glad I have read the book without the pressing agenda of writing a piece of coursework about it. There are a lot of sides to Arnold's writing that are worth exploring - tho, his sometimes tongue-in-cheek style of narration has left me wondering more than a few times which point he was trying to make. 

 

Just like the quote about greatness could be interpreted to mean all things to all people, Arnold's argumentation by use of fictional characters (and few real ones) generalised his ideas so much, that for most of the book I was left wanting to shout at him: "But where is your proof? Where are your sources for making this claim? What evidence have you to support your claim?"

 

And this was true even more so with the points I wanted to agree with, than it was with the sketchy claims I was looking to refute. It sounds great to hear Arnold use such flowery rhetoric like:

"It is in making endless additions to itself, in the endless expansion of its powers, in endless growth in wisdom and beauty, that the spirit of the human race finds its ideal. To reach this ideal, culture is an indispensable aid, and that is the true value of culture." Not a having and a resting, but a growing and a becoming, is the character of perfection as culture conceives it; and here, too, it coincides with religion. And because men are all members of one great whole, and the sympathy which is in human nature will not allow one member to be indifferent to the rest, or to have a perfect welfare independent of the rest, the expansion of our humanity, to suit the idea of perfection which culture forms, must be a general expansion.

But where are his examples? 

It sounds great to hear Arnold refer to "men are all members of one great whole" but in the same line of argument, he becomes divisive, too, when referring to the members of the working class not knowing what they want, to members of the middle class as wanting the wrong thing, to the members of the aristocracy as being too remote and not intervening enough in the frivolous pursuit of industry, to Philistines and Barbarians. But most divisively of all, Arnold seems to restrict the benefit of the application of "culture" as he saw it to the English.

"In the first place, it never was any part of our creed that the great right and blessedness of an Irishman, or, indeed, of anybody on earth except an Englishman, is to do as he likes; and we can have no scruple at all about abridging, if necessary, a non-Englishman's assertion of personal liberty. The British Constitution, its checks, and its prime virtues, are for Englishmen. We may extend them to others out of love and kindness; but we find no real divine law written on our hearts constraining us so to extend them."

Sarcasm? Or true sentiment? It depends on the reader's own outlook and interpretation. There is a fine line in Arnold's argument that can be used or abused for and against nationalism, for and against religion, for and against liberalism, etc. but left me with a general sense of puzzlement about whether any of Arnold's points had actually carried any momentum other than to promote the ever-so-wishy-washy phrase of "Sweetness and Light"?

"Now, the use of culture is that it helps us, by means of its spiritual standard of perfection, to regard wealth as but machinery, and not only to say as a matter of words that we regard wealth as but machinery, but really to perceive and feel that it is so. If it were not for this purging effect wrought upon our minds by culture, the whole world, the future as well as the present, would inevitably belong to the Philistines. The people who believe most that our greatness and welfare are proved by our being very rich, and who most give their lives and thoughts to becoming rich, are just the very people whom we call the Philistines. Culture says: "Consider these people, then, their way of life, their habits, their manners, the very tones of their voice; look at them attentively; observe the literature they read, the things which give them pleasure, the words which come forth out of their mouths, the thoughts which make the furniture of their minds; would any amount of wealth be worth having with the condition that one was to become just like these people by having it?"

By the end of the book, I was left craving for a more modern and more scientific approach to dissecting "culture" for all that it means, because while Arnold was (and to some extent still seems to be) celebrated for his efforts on defining culture, his efforts are limited to his own personal views with little to show any credentials of research or actual knowledge of society, history, or any other fields remotely relating to what we would now class as sociology, cultural studies, anthropology, etc. 

 

Nevertheless, if you're looking to dig into the mindset of a high-Victorian Englishman, Culture and Anarchy does make for an entertaining, tho slightly painful visit. 

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text 2017-01-30 21:42
Culture and Anarchy - Reading progress update: I've read 22%.
Culture and Anarchy - Jane Garnett,Matthew Arnold

Well, I'd never thought I'd quote Matthew Arnold, but this seems to turn out to be quite a timely read.

 

Arnold on Culture:

 

And because men are all members of one great whole, and the sympathy which is in human nature will not allow one member to be indifferent to the rest, or to have a perfect welfare independent of the rest, the expansion of our humanity, to suit the idea of perfection which culture forms, must be a general expansion.

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review 2016-10-13 17:57
Audio Book Review: Anarchy By Jaymin Eve & Leia Stone
Anarchy (Hive Trilogy) (Volume 2) - Leia Stone,Jaymin Eve

 

This book didn't supersede my expectations, but it didn't let me down either. It was a very nice quick read. My expectations are peaked for the next book, so I'm hoping it won't be a disappointment. All that being said this book was far from perfect and I do have some negative things to say about certain aspects of it.

 

I liked Charlie better in the first book because she was more witty and sarcastic during the duration of the overall book. This time around she was very whiny and by the end of it all it started to grate on my nerves. I also disliked her inferiority complex. In her head it seemed like everyone else mattered except for her, which doesn't really add up to the story line when you consider her 'unicorn blood'.  

 

I swear that I killed Tessa, in my head, at least ten times throughout this novel. I hated her 'woe is me' act, while she portrayed Charlie as a bitch because she was an Ash (which Charlie didn't even get a choice on the matter) and Tessa wasn't. I still don't understand how putting her life in danger to be with her friend is the better and smarter choice of just moving on with her natural human life.

 

Rider was very entertaining, but his hero complex made the ending all that more dramatic because of the consequences of defending Charlie. Other then that, I really enjoyed him this time around and am no longer skeptical of the relationship between him and Charlie. I also took a liking to the 'Sexy Six' in this novel as well. Everyone was very entertaining and I'd love to read spin offs about each of the characters.

 

The plot twists involving Charlie's mother and the ending (mild cliffhanger alert) was incredible and really helped the story a long. It was almost perfectly timed because every time the storyline slowed down the authors were right there to smack you with a twist.

 

If it's the last thing I do I will, at least, pick up the next book just to find out what happens after that cliffhanger. I hope Tessa isn't going to be a big part of the last book and I really, really want to know what secrets Sam has been keeping from everyone.

 

The Audio Book:

 

In the first book I said that the male voices sounded too feminine and I think it did get better in this reading. Some accents sounded a little off or strange to me, but I can deal with that. I probably overlooked most of it because I was imagining creative ways to maim Tessa during the entire novel.

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review 2016-06-08 13:59
3 Dead Princes by Danbert Nobacon, illustrated by Alex Cox
3 Dead Princes: An Anarchist Fairy Tale - Danbert Nobacon,Alex Cox

So, if any book review ever needed a soundtrack, it's this one. That, and this is pretty much the explanation why I picked it up: Political ideology wrapped up in fairy tale allegory isn't exactly my normal reading fare.

 

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTjC6rxHz8g if the embed doesn't work)

 

Danbert Nobacon is one of the members of the British anarchist punk band Chumbawumba, which most people probably only know from the above song, but they've been around for over 30 years. He's the bald guy with the bullhorn in the video above btw. Anarchist punk doesn't even begin to describe them - they're anti-fascist, pro-feminist, pro gay rights and rather infamous. Notably, unlike many seminal punk bands, they're really good musicians too!

 

In one of my favourite stunts, they once took £70k from GM to use a song of theirs in a car ad, and gave it straight to an anti-GM lobby group :). Danbert himself is pretty famous for tipping a bucket of ice water over the head of the then Deputy Prime Minister during their performance of Tubthumping at the Brit Awards (think the Grammys) - a performance that also featured them changing the lyrics of the chorus to "New Labour sold out the dockers, and they'll sell out the rest of us".

 

Alex Cox is equally punk, but he's a film maker: If you're my age, you'll likely remember or at least heard of Repo Man and Sid & Nancy, although he's taken to making avant garde/indie films since the 80's. They're quite a pair.

 

In any case, this is a book I picked up purely because I saw who the authors were, with almost no idea what the book would be about.

 

So the story itself, here's the blurb again:

 

Princess Stormy lives in a semi-detached castle with her family and a Fool. When an unhappy neighboring kingdom decides to invade, Stormy must go on her quest, meeting giant Cats, Mermangels, Giggle Monkeys, a Gricklegrack, and Flying Lizards on the way. Oh, and she kills three princes. But that's by accident, and anyway it's their own fault . . .

 

While it takes the form of a fairy tale, it satirises, subverts and inverts and converts it just as you might expect given the authors. Stormy (a nickname, she's actually Princess Alexandra) lives with her father the king and her stepmother, who is very much not evil. Alex is effectively set up to go on a quest for "an accidental adventure", with the Fool for company, and that's exactly what happens. On the way, as you'd expect, she makes new friends, new discoveries, and eventually returns home and saves the kingdom from invasion. And yes, there's the three princes. But it was totally their own fault.

 

It's clearly informed by typically British humour, like Monty Python and Douglas Adams, and in places it's very funny. While it purports to be an anarchist fairy tale, it's also a supremely feminist one, and if my daughters were of the age where they still instantly picked up and read things I handed them, they'd both be getting a copy. As they have regrettably passed that age, I'll still send them a recommendation and note they can borrow mine if they want.

 

The illustrations are fantastic, like a wild cross between Maurice Sendak and a little of the Tenniel Alice in Wonderland illustrations. I loved them, there's a couple I would buy as posters.

 

Finally, this is actually a serious little book, despite it's gleeful silliness. There's a very easy to read section at the end that lays out Anarchy as an ideology (despite the book itself touting "Ideas before ideology", Anarchy is of course an ideology itself). It talks about Kropotkin and evolution and symbiosis and cooperative behaviour between not just humans, but interspecies examples, and it's actually a pretty good intro.

 

Actually, I can't really decide what to rate this. The fairy tale itself, before reading the authors note, I think a 3. It's cute, and funny, but I think perhaps I didn't quite "get" it as much as I should have. Having read the note, I realised how much I was actually thinking about the story, and gave it another half star. And just writing this review, I'm thinking about it even more, and wondering if it shouldn't go up to a 4.

 

It's also a little hard to recommend. I think you'll know just from this review if it's something you would enjoy or not. All I know is, I did - even if I can't figure out how much!

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