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review 2018-09-09 17:41
Where the Wild Things Are
Where The Wild Things Are - Maurice Sendak

A boy is sent to bed, but instead of going straight to sleep he travels to a far off jungle where the wild things are!!! The pictures in this book are beautifully drawn and I think the kids would love to look at them. As an activity, I may let the young kids draw themselves as monsters and use adjectives to describe themselves. In "Where the Wild Things Are", the author uses lots of adjectives to help the reader create descriptive pictures in his or her mind. 

DRA level is 16-18 according to Scholastic.com

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review 2018-09-09 17:29
The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs
The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs - Jon Scieszka,Lane Smith

This is the TRUE story of the 3 little pigs told from the wolf's perspective. This would be a great way to teach children about perspectives and 1st person/ 3rd person, point of view. Kids sometimes don't realize the difference of a story between 3rd and 1st person point of view. There are other types too like omniscient, 2nd person, and limited. We would have to have an in depth lesson on pronouns and point of view, so I would read this book to a 3rd or 4th grade class.

An activity I would pair with it would be for kids to pick their favorite books and decide from which point of view the stories are told.I may assign paragraphs for the students to read in order to decide what point of view it is told from. That sounds boring, but it is important that kids understand.

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review 2018-09-09 17:20
Where the Sidewalk Ends
Where the Sidewalk Ends - Shel Silverstein

Every child should read poetry and this is the perfect book to find the best children's poetry out there! When I was in 4th grade my teacher actually went to the library and hand picked this book just for e because she thought I would enjoy it. She was right! I went home and read the poems to my grandparents all afternoon. The poems in this book often have meanings that may confuse younger readers so I suggest not using it until at least 4th grade and even then, for the advanced students.

Scholastic classifies the DRA level as 40 which means 4th or 5th grade.

An activity I would assign for my students would be to pick their favorite poem from the book and dissect it. Find any figurative language within the poem and determine its literal meaning.

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review 2018-06-30 15:47
Review: “Father Figure” by Kichiku Neko
Father Figure - Kichiku Neko,TogaQ

 

~ 3 stars ~

 

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review 2018-01-28 20:41
Persuasion
Persuasion (Wisehouse Classics - With Illustrations by H.M. Brock) - Jane Austen,H.M. Brock

Now they were as strangers; nay, worse than strangers, for they could never become acquainted. It was a perpetual estrangement.

When I first read Persuasion, I must have been out of my mind, preoccupied, or distracted with something because how else could I not have enjoyed this book back then as much as I have enjoyed it now?

 

Austen's last book is a masterpiece of subtlety and quiet power.

 

Anne Elliot is not as fierce or outspoken as my other favourite Austen heroines but she is such an awesomely strong character in her own way. She knows her own mind but also takes on advice from others. This ability be persuaded is, of course, at the heart of this story, and Austen plays with the concept of persuasion throughout the book - culminating in a debate between Anne and Captain Harville over whether men or women suffer longer after the loss of love. A debate which is overheard and influences a letter that within Austen's works is eclipsed only be the declarations of Mr. Darcy in Pride and Prejudice

 

There are a number of elements in this story that are similar to Austen's other books - the focus on women in Georgian society being confined to their roles as wives and daughters, the class snobbery, the importance of reputation, financial mismanagement, the plotting of romantic entanglements for position and wealth. 

 

Austen pokes fun and she admonishes - 

Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.

She does it quietly, by implication more often than by expressing it in words. It's a subtlety that needs some focus to absorb it, but that is ever so rewarding. 

 

Despite this, Persuasion for me will also be the book I will remember for Jane Austen calling an off-page character a ...

He had, in fact, though his sisters were now doing all they could for him, by calling him “poor Richard,” been nothing better than a thick-headed, unfeeling, unprofitable Dick Musgrove, who had never done anything to entitle himself to more than the abbreviation of his name, living or dead.

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