logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: mary-shelley
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-06 16:57
A book that will enthrall fans of Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, and people interested in XIX century true crime.
The Face of a Monster: America's Frankenstein - Patricia Earnest Suter

I was provided an ARC copy of this book that I freely chose to review.

Most of us have wondered more than once about the nature of fiction and the, sometimes, thin line separating reality from fiction. Although we assume that, on most occasions, fiction imitates reality, sometimes fiction can inspire reality (for better or for worse) and sometimes reality seems to imitate fiction (even if it is just a matter of perception). And although Slavoj Žižek and postmodernism might come to mind, none of those matters are new.

Suter’s non-fiction book combines three topics that are worthy of entire books (and some have been written about at length): Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Mary’s own life, and Anton Probst’s life and the murders he committed. Each chapter of the book alternates between the chronological (up to a point) stories of Shelley and Probst, and comparisons of the developments and events in the “life” (fictional, but nonetheless important) of Frankenstein’s creature. The author uses quotes and close- text-analysis of Frankenstein, and also interprets the text based on the biography of Shelley, to explain how the creature ended up becoming a monster. Although the novel is an early example of science-fiction/horror, many of the subjects it touched belong in literature at large. Nature versus nurture (is the creature bad because of the parts used to make him, or because nobody shows him care and affection?), science versus morality and religion (can knowledge be its own justification, or should there be something of a higher order limiting experiments), prejudice, mob mentality, revenge, loneliness and isolation…

Shelley’s life, marked by tragedy from the very beginning (her mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, died when Mary was only eleven days old) was dominated by men who never returned her affection and who were happy to blame her for any disasters that happened. She was part of a fascinating group, but, being a woman, she was never acknowledged and did not truly belong in the same circle, and it seems an example of poetic justice that her book has survived, and even overtaken in fame, the works of those men that seemed so important at the time (Lord Byron, Percy B. Shelley…).

I was familiar with Frankenstein and with the life of Mary Shelley and her mother (although I am not an expert) but had not heard about Probst. The author has done extensive research on the subject and provides detailed information about the life of the murderer, and, perhaps more interesting still, his trial and what happened after. That part of the book is invaluable to anybody interested in the development of crime detection in late XIX century America (his crimes took place in Philadelphia, although he was born in Germany), the nature of trials at the time, the history of the prison service, executions, the role of the press and the nature of true crime publications, and also in the state of medical science in that era and the popular experiments and demonstrations that abounded (anatomical dissections, phrenology, galvanism were all the rage, and using the bodies of those who had been punished with the death penalty for experiments was quite common). Human curiosity has always been spurred by the macabre, and then, as much as now, the spectacle of a being that seemed to have gone beyond the bounds of normal behaviour enthralled the public. People stole mementos from the scene of the crime, queued to see the bodies of the victims, and later to see parts of the murderer that were being exhibited. Some things seem to change little.

Each part of the book is well researched and well written (some of the events are mentioned more than once to elaborate a point but justifiably so) and its overall argument is a compelling one, although perhaps not one that will attract all readers. There are indeed parallels and curious similarities in the cases, although for some this might be due to the skill of the writer and might not be evident to somebody looking at Probst’s case in isolation. Even then, this does not diminish from the expertise of the author or from the engrossing topics she has chosen. This is a book that makes its readers think about fame, literature, creativity, family, imaginary and true monsters, crime, victims, and the way we talk and write about crime and criminals. Then and now.

I’d recommend this book to readers interested in Frankenstein and Mary Shelley’s work and life, also to people interested in true crime, in particular, XIX century crime in the US. As a writer, I thought this book would be of great interest to writers researching crime enforcement and serial killers in XIX century America, emigration, and also the social history of the time. And if we feel complacent when we read about the behaviour of the experts and the common people when confronted with Probst and his murders, remember to look around you and you’ll see things haven’t changed that much.

The author also provides extensive notes at the end of the book, where she cites all her sources.

 

Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-03-04 00:00
Mary's Monster: Love, Madness, and How Mary Shelley Created Frankenstein
Mary's Monster: Love, Madness, and How M... Mary's Monster: Love, Madness, and How Mary Shelley Created Frankenstein - Lita Judge This was a very interesting look in to Mary Shelly tortured life. Who knew she had such a life while living with Percy.
The illustrations made this book all the more haunting.
Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-03-02 00:00
Dracula: The Modern Prometheus
Dracula: The Modern Prometheus - Rafael Chandler,Mary Shelley,Bram Stoker Dracula: The Modern Prometheus is a retelling of both Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and Bram Stroker's Dracula with a few new twists by Rafael Chandler. I'm not going to spend time describing the story here because if you've read Frankenstein and Dracula you already know it. The reason you would want to get this book is to find out how the author put an original spin on these two literary classics.

I got this book off of Netgalley, what drew me to it was seeing that it was a combination of two horror classics that I love. I also thought it was interesting that the author put the names of the original writers on his book followed by his own. When you first start reading this book it's obvious that Rafael Chandler wrote it as a labor of love and  he has great affection for the source material along with the time period both books were written in. The language used, the way the characters are presented and the way the book is written makes it feel like the book was written in the 1800's.

The best part about this book was that it reminded me how much I love the source material and I loved seeing the changes to both that Rafael made. The worst part of the book is that some parts are too close to the source material. There were points that I felt bored reading it because I felt like I've heard it before and knew what was coming. A lot of the dialogue between the characters could have been cut and more time should have been spent on Dracula and the monster.

All in all though if you love these two classics then Rafael Chandler's book is something you are going to want to read. I enjoyed the fact that Harker, The Monster and Dracula were all female. I also liked the changes Rafeal made to the material and how he blended both stories.  The book may have benefited a little by having the author put more of an original spin on it but there was enough of his own voice here to keep me reading. When I finished this book I felt the need to go reread Dracula and Frankenstein and look for an original work by Rafael Chandler.
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-12-13 11:01
Er ging Zigarettenholen
Frankenstein - Mary Shelley

„Frankenstein“ (Untertitel: „The Modern Prometheus“) von Mary Shelley ist meiner Meinung nach Pflichtlektüre, interessiert man sich für Fantastik- und Science-Fiction-Literatur. 1818 anonym erstveröffentlicht, entwickelte es sich zu Shelleys bekanntestem Werk, das die Pop-Kultur wie kein zweites prägte. Die damals 18-jährige Autorin wurde von einem Albtraum inspiriert, der sie 1816 heimsuchte, während sie in Begleitung ihres Ehemannes Percy Bysshe Shelley und ihrer Stiefschwester Claire Clairmont Lord Byron in Genf besuchte. Bis heute ist umstritten, welche Einflüsse Mary Shelleys Traum auslösten, es scheint jedoch sicher, dass der in der Gruppe diskutierte Galvanismus ein entscheidender Faktor war. Für mich spielt es letztendlich keine Rolle, warum Shelley die Geschichte des Wissenschaftlers Victor Frankenstein niederschrieb – ich freue mich einfach, dass ich sie 200 Jahre später lesen kann.

 

Von Kindesbeinen an wird Victor Frankenstein von seinem unstillbaren Verlangen nach Erkenntnissen getrieben. Sein Wissensdurst ist grenzenlos. Er trachtet danach, die Geheimnisse von Leben und Tod zu entschlüsseln. Als Student in Ingolstadt profitiert er von den jüngsten Ergebnissen der modernen Forschung des 19. Jahrhunderts. Erfüllt von fieberhaftem Ehrgeiz gelingt ihm, wozu nur Gott fähig sein sollte: die Belebung toten Fleisches. Berauscht erschafft Frankenstein die unheilige Kopie eines Menschen. Doch seine Schöpfung entpuppt sich als abstoßend, monströs. Angewidert von der Frucht seiner Arbeit wendet sich Frankenstein ab. Die Ablehnung seines pervertierten Kindes wird ihm zum Verhängnis, denn das Monster weigert sich, seine Zurückweisung zu akzeptieren. Verbunden durch gegenseitigen Hass beginnen Schöpfer und Schöpfung einen tödlichen Tanz, der sie bis ans Ende der Welt führt.

 

„Frankenstein“ von Mary Shelley gilt als der erste Science-Fiction-Roman der Geschichte. Es ist immer schwierig, einen Klassiker, der so großen Einfluss auf Literatur und Kultur hatte, zu rezensieren. Oberflächlich scheint „Frankenstein“ lediglich der Unterhaltung zu dienen; erst in der Tiefe offenbaren sich zahlreiche elementare Themen, die sich um die zentrale Schöpfungsgeschichte des namenlosen Monsters herumranken. Dadurch entsteht eine verblüffende Ambiguität, die eine gradlinige Einteilung in Gut und Böse strikt verweigert. Die psychologisch konsequente, realistische Konstruktion der Protagonisten erlaubt der Geschichte, weit über diese engen Dimensionen hinauszuwachsen. „Frankenstein“ enthüllt sich als Tragödie dunkelster Couleur, die unausweichlich fatal enden muss. Ich war in vielerlei Hinsicht von der Lektüre überrascht. Am meisten erstaunte mich, dass ich Victor Frankenstein seinem Monster vorzog. Ich bin vom Gegenteil ausgegangen. Ein Grund ist sicher die Ich-Perspektive des ehrgeizigen Wissenschaftlers, doch diese Erklärung genügt nicht, um meine Schwierigkeiten mit dem Monster zu determinieren. Obwohl ich den Status der Kreatur als einsame, enttäuschte und verlassene Schöpfung anerkenne und objektiv Mitgefühl empfinde, stieß mich ihre aggressiv-explosive Seite ab. Das Monster ist kein rehäugiger, sanfter Galan, es wird von Zorn und Rachsucht beherrscht. Selbstverständlich sind diese Gefühle gerechtfertigt, aber die Verbissenheit, mit der es eine tödliche Fehde mit Frankenstein provoziert, erschien mir kleingeistig, selbstzerstörerisch und seines intellektuellen Potentials nicht würdig. Anstatt die Zurückweisung seines Schöpfers als Chance zu interpretieren und seine miserable Existenz eigenständig zu verbessern, reagiert es jähzornig und gewalttätig, wenn seine plumpen, ungelenken Versuche, Kontakt mit der Gesellschaft aufzunehmen, scheitern und versteift sich auf die widerwärtig egoistische und gewissenlose Idee, Frankenstein schulde ihm eine Gefährtin. Als dieser ablehnt, gewinnt der obsessive Hass des Monsters auf seinen Schöpfer die Oberhand. Aufgrund dieser Negativentwicklung war ich nicht in der Lage, mich dem Monster emotional zu nähern. Das heißt jedoch nicht, dass ich Victor Frankenstein als Opfer betrachte. Von Arroganz geblendet und frei von Demut schwingt er sich eigennützig zum Schöpfer auf, leugnet seine menschliche Fehlbarkeit, die ihm erst der erschreckende Anblick seiner Schöpfung vor Augen führt. Er bereut, dass er keinen Menschen nach seinem Abbild formen konnte. Er bereut nicht, sich überhaupt an der Schöpfung vergangen zu haben. Er ist sich bis zum Ende keiner Schuld bewusst, spricht sich von jeglicher Verantwortung frei und weigert sich, sein Versagen hinsichtlich seiner bizarren Elternrolle einzugestehen. Mit seiner gleichgültigen Grausamkeit verdammt er das Monster und sich selbst unwiderruflich. Die Sünde, seine Schöpfung im Stich zu lassen, ist unverzeihlich. Victor Frankenstein ist ein Vater, der Zigarettenholen ging und nie zurückkehrte.

 

Mary Shelley war ihrer Zeit weit voraus. Nicht nur literarisch, als Begründerin eines komplett neuen Genres, sondern auch gesellschaftsphilosophisch. „Frankenstein“ ist eine anregende Diskussion des Rechts auf Leben, der Position des Individuums in der Gesellschaft und des Grabens zwischen Schöpfer und Schöpfung. Obwohl Mary Shelley keine überragende Autorin war, kaschierte sie ihre Schwächen elegant und wirkungsvoll, indem sie sich hinter ihrer Geschichte völlig zurücknahm und ihren Figuren bescheiden das Rampenlicht überließ. Für mich war die Lektüre interessant und wertvoll, weil sie mir die ursprüngliche Form der Legende des Victor Frankenstein fernab von verfälschten Verfilmungen näherbrachte, die Erzählung, die der historische Beginn der Science-Fiction war. Ich hoffe, dass Mary Shelley im Jenseits beobachten kann, wie viel sie für die (weibliche) Literatur getan hat und sich daran erfreut, dass ihr Roman, der einst einem Albtraum entsprang, 200 Jahre nach seinem Erscheinen noch immer gelesen wird.

Source: wortmagieblog.wordpress.com/2017/12/13/mary-shelley-frankenstein
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-15 04:30
Rezension | Frankenstein von Mary Shelley
Frankenstein: oder Der moderne Prometheus. Roman - Mary Shelley,Georg Klein,Alexander Pechmann

Beschreibung

 

Nach jahrelangen Experimenten ist es Victor Frankenstein gelungen aus Materie einen künstlichen Menschen zu erschaffen. Doch als er sein Wesen erblickt und die Monstrosität dessen bemerkt, überlässt er das Ergebnis seiner Forschungen seinem eigenen Schicksal.

 

Während Victor Frankenstein sein Leben weiter lebt, lernt sein Monster nach und nach die Sprache, Bräuche und Umgangsformen der Menschen kennen. Auf der Suche nach Freundschaft und Akzeptanz stößt das Monster jedoch auf Abneigung, Hass und Wut. Aus seiner Verzweiflung heraus beschließt das monströse Wesen seinen Schöpfer ausfindig zu machen und an dessen Familie Rache zu nehmen.

 

Meine Meinung

 

"Worin, fragte ich mich häufig, besteht die Grundlage des Lebens? Es war eine verwegene Frage und eine, die man seit jeher für ein unlösbares Rätsel gehalten hat." (Frankenstein, Seite 70)

 

Mary Shelleys Klassiker der Schauerliteratur „Frankenstein“ wurde vom Manesse Verlag in der Urfassung aus dem Jahre 1818 neu aufgelegt (weitere Titel der Manesse Bibliothek findet ihr hier). Über das optische Erscheinungsbild mit dem knallig pinken Cover lässt sich streiten, schlussendlich ist es eine reine Geschmacksfrage. Mir persönlich gefällt es eigentlich ganz gut, da es ein wunderbare Eyecatcher ist und in der Buchhandlung bestimmt viele Blicke auf sich zieht! Das kleine handliche Format sowie das Vorlegeblatt im modernen Design und die Fadenbindung machen einen hochwertigen Eindruck.

 

Die Faszination die der Mythos Frankenstein und die Erschaffung eines menschenähnlichen Wesens mit künstlicher Intelligenz auf uns ausübt ist ungebrochen. Zudem scheint die Geschichte bis heute nichts an Aktualität eingebüßt zu haben. In Zeiten von Genmanipulation stellt sich erneut die Frage wie weit der Mensch durch sein Wissen und seine Forschung in die Evolution eingreifen darf, welche moralischen Aspekte dies mit sich bringt und welche Verantwortungen daraus erwachsen.

 

"Der Anblick des Kollosallen und Majestätischen in der Natur konnte mich freilich schon immer in feierliche Stimmung versetzen und ließ mich die vergänglichen Sorgen des Lebens vergessen." (Frankenstein, Seite 157)

 

Mary Shelley weist in ihrem Vorwort selbst darauf hin, dass ihr Roman „Frankenstein“ ein Schauerroman bwz. Gruselroman darstellen soll. Auch wenn sich für den heutigen Leser die gruseligen Momente nicht so recht erschließen, dürfte das Werk zu seiner Zeit durchaus für Schrecken gesorgt haben.

 

"Die genaueste Beschreibung meines abstoßenden, schauderhaften Äußeren findet sich hier, in einer Sprache, die dein eigenes Grauen schildert und meines unauslöschlich machte." (Frankenstein, Seite 219)

 

Besonders beeindruckt hat mich Mary Shelleys Erzählstil. Zu Beginn und Ende wird die Geschichte von dem Polarforscher Walton erzählt, der an seine Schwester schreibt und ihr berichtet wie er Victor Frankenstein von einer Eisscholle gerettet hat. Dies bildet einen einzigartigen Rahmen der zur eigentlichen Geschichte genügend Abstand aufbaut um aus einer anderen Perspektive auf die Ereignisse zu blicken. In einer weiteren Erzählebene berichtet Victor Frankenstein von seinem Schicksal welches durch den Einblick in die Perpektive des Monsters ergänzt wird. Für mich übte Mary Shelleys Roman gerade durch diese verschiedenen moralischen Blickwinkel eine ganz besondere Anziehungskraft aus.

 

Fazit

 

Die Sprache und Erzählkunst von Mary Shelley haben einen zeitlosen Klassiker erschaffen.

Source: www.bellaswonderworld.de/rezensionen/rezension-frankenstein-oder-der-moderne-prometheus-von-mary-shelley
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?