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review 2017-07-21 16:02
The Mage King (The Ice Queen #2) by Rebecca Bauer
The Mage King - Rebecca Bauer
The Mage King is the second book in The Ice Queen series, and we return to see what Aria and Cas are up to, two years after we last saw them. They are now proud parents of Elena, although Cas seems to have taken to it a bit easier than Aria has done. They have worked hard for peace, but it seems like the mages are up to their tricks again. Not only that, but the magic of the mages seems to be failing. It becomes apparent that those who are not having problems (like Cas) may have a different blood line than others. Not only that, but King Liam from the west is making his way eastwards, and no one is quite sure why.
 
So much happens in this book, and yet it is easy to follow and is not unnecessarily complicated. Aria and Cas continue to go from strength to strength, no matter what is thrown at them. Their love and trust in each other is a strength that others just don't understand, and yet I adore it! They are not saccharine sweet, one of the things I love about Aria is her razor-sharp tongue, but are unfailing honest and loyal although they both play the deception/political game with style and finesse.
 
I refuse to give out any spoilers about this book. Trust me, you will want to immerse yourself in the Ice Realm, along with the other places, just like you did with The Ice Queen. I will say that there were no editing or grammatical errors that disrupted my reading flow. Once again, this is an exceptional adult fantasy that I highly recommend.
 
* A copy of this book was provided to me with no requirements for a review. I voluntarily read this book, and my comments here are my honest opinion. *
 
Merissa
Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!

 

#Adult, #Fantasy, @Xpresso Reads, 5 out of 5 (exceptional)

 

Source: sites.google.com/site/archaeolibrarian/merissa-reviews/theicequeen12byrebeccabauer
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review 2017-07-21 16:01
The Ice Queen (The Ice Queen #1) by Rebecca Bauer
The Ice Queen - Rebecca Bauer

The Ice Queen is the first book in The Ice Queen series, and we meet Aria for the first time when she is in 'training' in the courtesan area of the Temple of the Moon. Immediately, you are drawn into a world of intrigue, where someone may be completely different to who you thought they were, and their actions are different to what you supposed.

 
Aria is a fantastic female lead - she is strong, authoritative, caring, wilful, and determined. She has a reason for everything she does, even if she doesn't realise it until that light bulb moment. And then you have her 'advisors' - Casimir, Valtteri, and Seb. All three of these characters are amazing and well rounded, and yet they too have their own advisors. It is layer upon layer of support and intrigue, and it makes for one heck of a ride!
 
With plenty of battle action, some love action, oodles of political manoeuvrings, and an outstanding amount of honesty, I can easily say that I loved every word and I can't wait to read book two - The Mage King. For all fans of fantasy, I can highly recommend it. 
 
* A copy of this book was provided to me with no requirements for a review. I voluntarily read this book, and my comments here are my honest opinion. *
 
Merissa
Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!

 

#Adult, #Fantasy, @Xpresso Reads, 5 out of 5 (exceptional)

 

Source: sites.google.com/site/archaeolibrarian/merissa-reviews/theicequeen12byrebeccabauer
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review 2017-07-16 07:45
Delightful and uplifting
Girl Gone Greek - Rebecca A Hall

I can’t believe it’s taken me this long to get round to reading this lovely book. It’s been waiting patiently on my Kindle for ages.

But better late than never, as they say. And so at last I’ve been able to enjoy Rebecca's excellent novel about Rachel’s experiences as a TEFL teacher in Greece. Anyone who’s ever lived or worked abroad, or thought about doing so, will revel in this story, with its ups and downs of foreign life, the faux pas and the frustrations but the endless fascination of discovering another culture. I’ve never been to Greece and so I eagerly soaked up every detail we get of all the places our heroine describes to us, and, of course, the people she meets.

There’s not only the geographical journey, there’s a spiritual journey too. Rachel feels that she has a point to prove to unsympathetic family when she undertakes a year of TEFL: that she’s independent and perfectly capable, thank you. But you do get the distinct feeling she’s not quite happy in her own skin at the start of the book, but by the end, when she’s the girl gone Greek, then she most certainly is. Greece is her spiritual home, the place where she can be who she’s meant to be. Through friendships and minor but significant triumphs at work, Rachel puts down her roots and blossoms.

It’s a delightful, uplifting book, full of sharp observations, humour and determination. 

 

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text 2017-07-14 18:28
Nonfiction Science Book Club Reading List
Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal - Mary Roach
Storm in a Teacup: The Physics of Everyday Life - Helen Czerski
The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements - Sam Kean
Forensics: The Anatomy of Crime (Wellcome) - Val McDermid
Darwin's Ghosts: The Secret History of Evolution - Rebecca Stott

You may have seen MbD's posts on the new nonfiction book club and the suggestions for future reads floating down the dashboard in the last couple of days:

 

There's now a list containing all the books that have been suggested so far:

 

http://booklikes.com/apps/reading-lists/799/nonfiction-science-book-club-reading-list

 

The discussion group is currently still named for the buddy read that inspired it, "The Invention of Nature" -- the group page is here:

http://booklikes.com/groups/show/980/buddy-read-for-the-invention-of-nature

 

-- and the corresponding book club page is here:

http://booklikes.com/book-clubs/90/buddy-read-for-the-invention-of-nature

 

Do take a look and see if you'd be interested in joining!

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text 2017-07-13 19:54
BT's Science Shortlist
The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements - Sam Kean
Life in a Shell: A Physiologist's View of a Turtle - Donald C. Jackson
Darwin's Ghosts: The Secret History of Evolution - Rebecca Stott
The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History - Elizabeth Kolbert
How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction - Beth J. Shapiro
Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong—and the New Research That's Rewriting the Story - Angela Saini
Get Well Soon: History's Worst Plagues and the Heroes Who Fought Them - Jennifer Wright
Forensics: The Anatomy of Crime (Wellcome) - Val McDermid
Human Universe by Professor Brian Cox (7-May-2015) Paperback - Professor Brian Cox
Opening Skinner's Box: Great Psychological Experiments Of The 20th Century - Lauren Slater

Inspired by the posts my fellow future potential Science Reading Buddies, I've browsed my shelves, my tbr, and library catalogues for Science-related books that looked interesting.

And when I say inspired, I mean I stole lots of books off those lists also. ;)

 

There are lots and lots of other books I would like to read, but I needed to narrow down a short list.

 

Also, I have created a shelf for the long-list and science books I have read.

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