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review 2017-09-21 01:26
Troublemaker: Surviving Hollywood and Scientology by Leah Remini
Troublemaker: Surviving Hollywood and Scientology - Rebecca Paley,Leah Remini

This book is unreal! You have to read it to know what I mean. Leah Remini is so brutally honest, I tend to believe her. What these people do is just despicable. Kudos to Leah for getting herself and her family out.

 

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review 2017-09-14 18:43
This year's classic...
Rebecca - Daphne du Maurier,Sally Beauman

I'll be honest from the start, I would never choose to read a Classic, I find them dated and slow, and rather pretentious. However, for some reason, book groups seem to feel a need to foist one on me every so often and their latest offering was Rebecca. "Oh no, you'll love it." they said. Oh no, I won't! Actually, 3 stars isn't bad a for a Classic, Lolita fared worse.

 

So, poor girl falls on her feet and marries rich man. Hardly an original premise. There was the nasty scheming housekeeper, who tricks poor girl into making a complete fool of herself. And the dead first wife who plays a huge part, even though she's dead.

 

I don't think I would have made it through all 400+ pages without the help of the very upper-crust, BBC voice of Anna Massey, but although she was a bit irritating, she was the perfect voice for the book.

 

But the ending - No! No, no, no!!!

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text 2017-09-06 13:37
SpotLight for Book Tour I am Involved in.
Wings Unseen - Rebecca Gomez Farrell

 


 
 

“Wings Unseen” by Rebecca Gomez Farrell

 

Wings Unseen
Rebecca Gomez Farrell
Published by: Meerkat Press
Publication date: August 22nd 2017
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult

To end a civil war, Lansera’s King Turyn relinquished a quarter of his kingdom to create Medua, exiling all who would honor greed over valor to this new realm on the other side of the mountains. The Meduans and Lanserim have maintained an uneasy truce for two generations, but their ways of life are as compatible as oil and water.

When Vesperi, a Meduan noblewoman, kills a Lanserim spy with a lick of her silver flame, she hopes the powerful display of magic will convince her father to name her as his heir. She doesn’t know the act will draw the eye of the tyrannical Guj, Medua’s leader, or that the spy was the brother of Serrafina Gavenstone, the fiancèe of Turyn’s grandson, Prince Janto. As Janto sets out for an annual competition on the mysterious island of Braven, Serra accepts an invitation to study with the religious Brotherhood, hoping for somewhere to grieve her brother’s murder in peace. What she finds instead is a horror that threatens both countries, devouring all living things and leaving husks of skin in its wake.

To defeat it, Janto and Serra must learn to work together with the only person who possesses the magic that can: the beautiful Vesperi, whom no one knows murdered Serra’s brother. An ultimate rejection plunges Vesperi forward toward their shared destiny, with the powerful Guj on her heels and the menacing beating of unseen wings all about.

Readers of all ages will enjoy Wings Unseen, Rebecca Gomez Farrell’s first full-length novel. It is a fully-imagined epic fantasy with an unforgettable cast of characters.

Goodreads / Amazon / Barnes & Noble / Kobo

 

Excerpt

Serra
They had not lived together in years, but Agler read her thoughts fast enough. “I’m changed, truly, I swear.” He pushed his chin-length, curling hair behind his ears. “The king, he came to me at Gavenstone. I was imprisoned in our study and allowed no visitor until he arrived. I knew I had been found out, of course. I knew it the moment my advisors—that pool of sheven—deserted the manor. They had received a message from our contact in Callyn. They did not tell me we had been discovered. They just ran, leaving me alone in my ignorance and pride as Captain Wolxas rode up with a battalion behind him. If I were smart, I would have run, too.”
He paused, his eyes filled with disgust. “No, if I were smart, I never would have rebelled in the first place. Try to kill the king and take his place with a Meduan army I had never seen? By Madel’s hand, I was stupid.”
“You are an idiot.” Serra did not hide the anger she felt. “A selfish, arrogant boy who thinks only of himself. Why did you do it, Agler? What possessed you?” His failed plot stunk of Meduans, and she could not stomach listening to it. How could her brother have taken part in such vile deeds? She was to become queen! What higher place than brother to the crown could he have wanted?
“I was an idiot,” he responded calmly. “But I have changed. Serra, the king forgave me. He did not force me to kneel but sat in the chair beside me in silence for agonizing minutes. When he spoke, he described his Murat dream. It was about Lansera, about the peace he had maintained and the future he hoped would come to pass. He spoke passionately of us, of all Lanserim, and how we could become an ever nobler people if we but tried. He foresaw a time when the Meduans would reunite with us, no longer intent on working evil on others, inspired by our compassion, our deeds. He believes this time will come sooner than anyone can imagine. As he spoke, I realized I had no idea what valor was, what it truly meant for someone to live his or her life with a meaning and purpose. But the king is valorous, and when he shows it—by Madel’s hand, Serra, he glows.”
The passion in Agler’s words had raised her gooseflesh. But she could not imagine such a meeting taking place. King Dever Albrecht fulfilled his duties efficiently and with wisdom, but she had never heard him express anything resembling zeal, much less seen his countenance consumed with it. Yet her brother sat directly across from her, nearly alight with some sort of fervor of his own.
“I asked for his forgiveness right then and there, and he gave it,” Agler continued. “There are many who think King Dever Albrecht is a hard man. I once thought him a weak one, but I was wrong, horribly wrong. He is king because Madel wants him to be, not because he was the only Albrecht left after the war.” Tears fell, and he made no move to wipe them. She reached across the table and took her brother’s hands in hers for the first time she could remember.

 

Author Bio:

In all but one career aptitude test Rebecca Gomez Farrell has taken, writer has been the #1 result. But when she tastes the salty air and hears the sea lions bark, she wonders if maybe sea captain was the right choice after all. Currently marooned in Oakland, CA, Becca is an associate member of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Her short stories, which run the gamut of speculative fiction genres, have been published by Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Pulp Literature, the Future Fire, Typehouse Literary Magazine, and an upcoming story in theDark, Luminous Wings anthology from Pole to Pole Publishing among others. Maya’s Vacation, her contemporary romance novella, is available from Clean Reads. She is thrilled to have Meerkat Press publish her debut novel.
Becca’s food, drink, and travel writing, which has appeared in local media in CA and NC, can primarily be found at her blog, The Gourmez. For a list of all her published work, fiction and nonfiction, check out her author website at RebeccaGomezFarrell.com.

Website / Goodreads / Facebook / Twitter

 

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review 2017-09-05 19:55
Halloween Bingo -- Terrifying Women Square -- yeah.
Men Explain Things to Me - Rebecca Solnit

 

 

 

Because we should all be so terrifying, instead of terrified.

 

The truth is that even if we don't live in constant conscious fear, our lives are bounded by it, our actions limited by it.  It's far more real than haunted houses or vampires.  We're far more likely to be victims of sexual assault or gender-based silencing than of a zombie apocalypse.

 

If I remember correctly, many of Barbara Michaels's contemporary gothics included -- if not specifically featured -- elements of misogyny and oppression.  It's the main theme in Houses of Stone, both in Ismene's mysterious manuscript as well as in Dr. Karen Holloway's search for the author's true identity and her fate.  But there are also elements of misogyny in Ammie, Come Home, as we discovered in our buddy read last year.  Again in The Walker in Shadows and Vanish with the Rose, where women are denied the right to love whom they choose.  Be Buried in the Rain involves both historical and contemporary efforts to silence and/or punish women for daring to . . . be.

 

Almost all of our "terrifying women" authors are doing the same thing Solnit does -- they are speaking out against The Terror we all face.  The terror of silencing.

 

It even appears in the poorly written novels, like The Haunting of Ashburn House, where the character of Adrienne is  making an attempt to take control of her life.  The irony, of course, is that it's not a man who is trying to destroy her, but she's still making her effort to exist.  (And maybe that was the point of not having any boyfriends in the story??)  Gemma Rose, owner of the Little Stables Tearoom in A Scone to Die For, resists her mother's efforts to mold her into a traditional role and puts her own efforts into making her own way with her own choices.  And in Terror in Tower Grove, the repression of the patriarchal religion imposes its strictures on Tricia, on Andrea, denying them their full humanity in the name of  . . .  God.

 

Men Explain Things to Me is the Ghostland of women writers in all genres, from the Brontes and Andre Norton who had to hide behind androgynous pseudonyms to all the romance writers who endure snickers and dismissal because they write for women.

 

Yeah.  Terrifying Women indeed.

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text 2017-09-05 18:41
Reading progress update: I've read 70%.
Men Explain Things to Me - Rebecca Solnit

 

Screen shot at 70%.  The first paragraph refers to sexual assault, but it could just as easily refer to just about anything women say . . . or do.  Especially women who aspire to . . . power.  Of any kind.

 

The second paragraph is self-explanatory.

 

(c) 2014.  Before, you know, 2016.  Or 2017.

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