logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: steampunk
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-12-11 04:32
Beauty and Beastly by Melanie Karsak
Beauty and Beastly: Steampunk Beauty and the Beast (Steampunk Fairy Tales) - Melanie Karsak

A beautifully written steampunk retelling of Beauty and the Beast.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-11-29 01:58
The Wonder Engine by T. Kingfisher
The Wonder Engine - T. Kingfisher

Series: Clocktaur War #2

 

This wraps up the short Clocktaur War duology. I didn't particularly enjoy the romance in this one although I appreciate the way it was done. I'm mostly giving this one three stars because it the dialogue had me giggling to myself on several occasions.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-11-28 10:28
Ebook Giveaway of Fanya in the Underworld by Jordan Elizabeth
Fanya in the Underworld - Jordan Elizabeth Mierek,Aaron Siddall

Synopsis

In an Alaska owned by Tsarist Russia, steamtech is melded with spirit magic to create a mighty machine. The elements are plentiful, but the Higher World crumbles and the local Inuit people are consumed.

When their father dies, the council denies Fanya her inheritance and sells her sister into slavery at the behest of the mysterious Zachary Finley. Fanya's quest to protect her sister and regain what's rightfully hers leads her from the Underworld of Stalgorod to the untamed wilds of greater Alaska.

It isn’t just Zachary Finley who wants Fanya to suffer. Frost Witches and Sea Hags have a thirst for her, and Saints have decided she’s perfect to become their tool.

Magic flows through Fanya and it is ready for her to battle against industry for the fate of enslaved souls.
Source: www.iambookseater.com/2018/11/review-giveaway-fanya-in-underworld-by.html
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-11-14 22:44
This Monstrous Thing: Or Steampunk Frankenstein
This Monstrous Thing - Mackenzi Lee

I've been putting off writing a review for this book because I still can't figure out what to say about it. It's steampunk Frankenstein, so if that sounds appealing to you then snap it up post-haste. If you're not a steampunk fan, well, know what you are getting into.

 

Lee does an excellent job evoking the past in all her books, and this one is no exception. The interesting thing is that she infuses her world with machinery and mechanical men. It almost has a cyberpunk quality in that so much of the book is concerned with the divide between machine and man, and at what point when adding machinery and subtracting flesh does a man cease being human. It's an interesting direction to take the story, and there are also some astute comments of disability and social standing.

 

Where the book flagged for me was that I went into it wanting a story about brotherhood, and to watch these two brothers grapple with one another throughout the narrative. However, much like the source of inspiration, the two spend most of the book separated and only clash at the ending. This is all well and good, it's just not the story I wanted. While the book spent lavish detail and time exploring other characters and locales I found myself frustrated that it wasn't spending its time on things that interested me more. It doesn't feel fair to be critical of a book for not being what you want it to be, especially when it does a fine job in every other respect, but here I am.

 

If you dig steampunk you will likely enjoy this book. If you like historical fiction with a twist you will likely enjoy this book. If you want to read an interesting re-telling of Frankenstein you will also likely enjoy this book. If you want a story of brothers at odds with one another, and an exploration of their relationship, this will likely not hit the mark for you.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-11-01 21:09
Dead Handsome (Buffalo Steampunk #1) by Laura Strickland
Dead Handsome: A Buffalo Steampunk Adventure - Laura Strickland

Clara has a gift - she can raise the dead. It’s not a talent she uses often - but when she needs a husband to keep her home and protect the children she keeps safe she can think of no other way to get a man quickly

 

Though he turns out to be far less pliable than she imagined.



Steampunk! Sign me up

 

Steampunk with magic! Sign me up twice! I do so love a paranormal steampunk.

 

This is a moderately low-key steampunk and magical setting though. The central premise is that Clara does have the power to raise the dead. And I can see you looking at me now and questioning how “low key magic” and “resurrection and necromancy” can actually co-exist - but this, so far, seems to be the sum total of the magic of this book. Clara doesn’t have an army of zombies in the basement, but she can raise the recently dead so long as they’re not too beat up. And she uses this ability, for the first time, on Liam - because she needs a man. But after that she doesn’t use it much nor does she have other magic to fall back on to help her in her hour of need. The battle instead rests far more on the limited resources they have at their disposal with a lot of that limited by the prejudices and injustices of the world and time they live in

 

Clara has turned her house into a haven for the dispossessed. Most of them are children- abused by parents or employers, poor, injured and disabled from industrial accidents and generally desperate in a time when there’s no support and no care for the weakest and most vulnerable in society - including child labourers and the extremely lethal factories that were so common in the Industrial revolution. We also have Georgina, a Black woman and a former slave who has also joined the household - who is clever, honest, tough and deeply valued by Clara. She also has a whole side storyline of her romance with Clara’s lawyer and the whole scandal of that atr the time

 

Liam himself is Irish and is considered both inherently criminal and utterly disposable by many of the wealthy and powerful characters in this book.

 

The central conflict of the book - trying to fulfil the legal requirements to keep the house feels a little… odd. I mean the terms her grandfather set is that she has to be married by the age of 21 or she is evicted. Granddad clearly wants this and will maliciously pursue kicking her out… but… why? I mean, why set the condition in the first place? Why even stick to these conditions? I want to see these legal papers that the grandfather has signed that legally compel him to give a house AND annual income to his granddaughter which he doesn’t have the power to just tear up and declare “nah”. And if he was so against his daughter’s husband and his granddaughter, why even give them anything at all? If it’s social status and a fear of being seen kicking his family out onto the street, why doesn’t he fear this still? I mean, in these sexist times, a wealthy patriarchy kicking his unmarried 21 year old granddaughter into the street doesn’t exactly look good either.

 

Still running with it isn’t hard and it’s still fun if you don’t dwell on that which isn’t hard as it isn’t overly that central. The internal logic of the McGuffin doesn’t matter so much as the journey

 

An element I just can’t get past is the examination of Clara’s morality. It’s very good that we have this moral hand wringing from Clara about whether she is a terrible person in how she decided to use Liam for her own well being. Treating him as a blank slate because she needed him to keep her home rather than viewing him as a person or considering whether he has any kind of history at all. I mean this is all extremely good debate and we see Clara repeatedly make some really difficult decisions as she considers the easiest path that would save them all but be morally reprehensible. There’s one thing she doesn’t consider

 

 

Read More

 

 

Source: www.fangsforthefantasy.com/2018/10/dead-handsome-buffalo-steampunk-1-by.html
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?