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review 2018-05-26 06:52
Adrift...
Adrift - Rob Boffard

Loved it! The suspense was great and there was non-stop action the entire ride! I literally held my breath through quite a bit of the book.

 

The boys, Corey and Malik, were my favorite characters out of all of them, besides the pilot, Captain Jana Volkova, I liked her a lot too, but the kids were seriously the stars of the show.

 

I only had an issue with one small part-

 

Roman turned sides way too easily. It seemed like one minute he was plotting their demise and the next he was helping to save them. I can see what the author was trying to show-that Corey being a child had a profound effect in his decision but geez, it just happened a little too quickly. 

 

(spoiler show)


All-in-all a nice thrilling space adventure and definitely worth reading!

 

*I received this ARC from the author and the Goodreads FirstReads program in exchange for an honest review. Thank you!

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review 2018-04-15 12:05
Paris Adrift
Paris Adrift - E.J. Swift

[I received a copy of this book through Netgalley.]

I love myself a time travel story, and both the premise as well as the cover here caught my eye. Unfortunately, even though ultimately it was a quick an easy read (as opposed to a book I trudged through), I wasn’t sold on the story or the characters.

I think this is due to the prologue letting me expect a more ‘targetted’ time travel story: a group of time travellers (called ‘incumbents’) holed up in a bunker in Prague, the world dying around them due to a nuclear apocalypse. This war having been triggered by a speech made at the Sacre-Coeur in Paris, the group decides to send one of them back in time in order to prevent that man’s lineage from ever starting. But there’s a catch here: these incumbents can only travel using ‘anomalies’ to which they’re attuned, and since they can’t use someone else’s Anomaly, in this case they need to send someone with an Anomaly in Paris. Which turns out to be Léon, an incumbent with too many travels under his belt, who may or may not be able to perform -all- the time jumps needed to alter the past. Léon does jump, but his aim tis to find a budding traveller in 2017 Paris, and guide them to discover their Anomaly, then to perform the required jumps while they’re still ‘fresh’, so to speak. Along with Léon comes the chronometrist, a former traveller who lost her body (and probably her sanity, too), and whose task is to guide the new incumbent.

…And that’s where it started to turn wrong, because for most of the book, the plot felt only remotely touched, with our new incumbent, Hallie, being guided in such a circumvented way that from beginning to end, I’m not sure she really got what she was doing. And I’m not sure why that was, considering one of Léon’s directives (stated in the prologue, no spoiler here) was to guide her once her ‘mission’ was accomplished, but that… didn’t happen? It was weird. It mostly consisted of Hallie stumbling through her Anomaly, ending up in a different period, bumbling around trying not to get in trouble, with the chronometrist taunting her now and then. It tied up in the end, yet I never got rid of the feeling that plot-wise, the book was plodding rather than making progress.

Character-wise, too, I believe that time spent on stumbling around was meant for character development, but in the end, I didn’t get that much of a feel for Hallie and the people around her, and they end up rather boring to me.

Now, to be fair, I really liked the way the novel approached solutions to ‘prevent a person from being born’. In a lot of time travel stories, the usual approach is to kill them (the Sarah Connor effect), which obviously raises its lot of ethical questions. Here, Hallie found (well, was pushed to) other ways, and that was refreshing to see.

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review 2018-02-14 17:33
That one time you had a work-study visa in Europe and spent all your time drinking instead of sightseeing (+time travel)
Paris Adrift - E.J. Swift

Disclaimer: reviewing uncorrected digital proof via NetGalley

 

"Adrift" is apt: the author took on a challenging format and offers some true excellence in character writing and worldbuilding, but the experience of reading this book is, for better or worse, as if you're just as adrift, confused, and purposeless as main character Hallie.

Hallie's doing the dissipated youth finding herself routine in Paris. But before we find that out, we have to wade through some future revolutionary setup with time-travellers who want to go back and change the past to resolve the blighted dystopian future they're living in. This is the frame story and the plot, but Hallie doesn't figure out where she fits into it until extremely late in the game. Instead, she's working and drinking her life away in a bar, hanging out with people who do the same, and - unwillingly at first - hopping through time in the cellar.

 

There's a lot to like at a technical level. Swift conveys that dreamy/nightmarish feeling and atmosphere of being 20-something and finding your group on the road, living in the moment, but with an uneasy awareness that the moment must pass and you're more than where you're stuck now. Paris and the group of international workers at Hallie's bar are conveyed with detailed world-building excellence, including what (as far as my limited French can tell) is accurate and characteristic uses of French.

 

If you think of this as a literary novel, it deserves a high rating. Dreamy, evocative, endlessly confusing, but in a way that hints at careful construction, it's an effective deep-dive into character. But the frame story plot lags as Hallie finds herself, and there are too many mysteries held for too long for it to be effective as a genre work. If you need fast, thriller pacing, spicy romance, or intricate and engage SFF goings-on to enjoy a book, this is not the story for you. If you're happy to invest some time, drift through the story, and maybe reminisce about (or look forward to) your own dissipated youthful travels, this offers much to appreciate. Just sit back and let it flow.

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review 2018-02-11 15:10
Difficult book to categorise- chick lit with time travel?
Paris Adrift - E.J. Swift

 

Although not really my type of novel, I read it through to the end to see how the plot develops. It centres around Hallie, an English young woman, arriving in Paris to get away from her family and university life. She encounters many characters, especially at work, but also finds herself time-travelling to help others ( a bit Quantum Leap / Sliders).Without giving too much away, she finds love and a purpose.

 

The plot moves along a bit slowly as the characters are developed and there’s a fair amount of introspection. There are some nice stylistic moments but generally the book did not excite me although I “enjoyed” the possible future of Paris.

 

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review 2017-09-08 00:00
Adrift
Adrift - Paul Griffin Terrible story, well told. I liked it so well, I immediately ordered another book by this author.
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