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Search tags: Amy-Bloom
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review 2015-07-02 22:49
Lucky Us
Lucky Us - Amy Bloom

Lucky Us by Amy Bloom was our last book club selection and discussion. It would seem it was a unanimous thumb's down.  I had never heard of this book nor the author and based on the summary that I read on it in order to "vote" for our selection it didn't particularly appeal to me.

 

This is the story of Eva who being raised alone by her mom while her dad sometimes "visited.".  One day her mother decides to drop her off at her dad's house and never looks back.  Eva finds out her dad was married to another woman who has since died and she also has a half sister named Iris.  Thrown together unexpectedly they decide to make the best of their situation.  Iris is successful in many local talent shows and has been saving her prize money in order to go to Hollywood.  When Eva catches her dad rifling through Iris' room searching for the money Iris decides it's time to leave home now.  Eva tags along and their adventure begins.  They meet many noteworthy characters that manipulate their journey. 

 

I had difficulty connecting with any of these individuals except perhaps Eva who I think tried her best considering the hand she was dealt. There was too much chaos and dysfunction within the story for me to enjoy it. I grow weary of the characters using each other for gain, find it distasteful and as a result often wind up not liking the book.  Unfortunately this was one of those times. I would not recommend this one.

 

How I acquired this bookHalf.com website

Shelf LifeLess than 2 months

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review 2015-05-24 23:47
Lucky Us by Amy Bloom
Lucky Us: A Novel - Amy Bloom
According to the rave reviews and book summary, Lucky Us by Amy Bloom is the story of Iris and Eva, two sisters who lived in the Hollywoodesque 1940s environment. I got the idea it was going to be a Thelma & Louise story of some sort, or an unforgettable story about the unbreakable bond between two sisters, but I should’ve paid attention to one line in the book description that said: “story of our fragile, absurd, heroic species.”

I didn’t find anything fragile or heroic in this book. Absurd, that is the key word in all of this. This book didn’t meet my expectations. It was supposed to be the story of two sisters, but it ended up being only about one sister. The premise was great, half-sisters who fly away from the nest but instead of living amazing adventures together, they end up facing their new lives apart.

It sounded good but overall it just felt like the author had a bunch of odd and pointless story lines that she tried to intertwine but failed at it. There’s a lesbian relationship, the failed movie star career, an orphan kid they kidnap/adopt and no authority seems to mind, their father’s love story with the jazz singer, a guy who turns out to be a German spy, to name a few.

The change in narration was a big fail. The transition between first person narration (Eva), third person narration and letters from Iris was odd and somewhat confusing. The setting could have been fabulous with that old Hollywood glamour and jazzy ambiance, but it felt like it was wasted. The characters, I couldn’t find a single one I could relate to. And the ending, it was so rushed and sudden. It felt like the author got tired and wrote “the end” to get it over with.

The cover is a good book cover. I like it a lot. It looks magical and intriguing. Unfortunately, it has no relation to the story, or at least I was so dulled and bored by this book that I couldn’t find any relation between the story and the cover. In the end this book wasn’t my cup of Joe.

I never say don’t read this, because in the end you guys are free to read what you please, and maybe the final printed copy of this book was edited and better than the advanced readers copy I read. But if my word counts a little, you can find more engaging reads in the vast ocean of published books. If you are going to read it, borrow it from a friend or library, trust me, it will be money well saved.

For quotes and other stuff check out my blog.
 



DISCLOSURE STATEMENT
I received an Electronic copy of this book but was not financially compensated in any way nor obliged to review. The opinions expressed are my own and are based on my personal experience while reading it. This post contains affiliate links.
 
 
 
Source: bloggeretterized.wordpress.com/2015/05/24/read-reviewed-50-lucky-us-by-amy-bloom
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review 2015-04-21 01:54
Lucky Us
Lucky Us: A Novel - Amy Bloom

This novel is a roller coaster—the highs, the lows, the sharp turns and corkscrew loops.

 

But that does not mean it's great. The entire novel is a little too crazy and unpredictable. This is the fourth of Bloom's novels that I have read—and I really enjoyed her last two, Away and Where the God of Love Hangs Out. So I had high hopes for this one. But really, how many crazy and difficult instances can one woman and her half sister find themselves in? And one man? Or, actually, two men?

 

As usual though, Bloom is adept at giving her characters lives before and after her story takes place. This time, she has woven them into the plot a bit more—rather than being an aside. I think I prefer the quick summaries—as she did in Away—much more.

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review 2014-10-21 03:57
Lucky Us
Lucky Us: A Novel - Amy Bloom

This is one of those books I got from NetGalley because I had seen it on a “books to watch” type of list. As the publication date approached, I wanted to read it so I could post a review in sync with the launch. But then I began to see the book everywhere, and I was pretty sure that my review was not going to matter all that much. But I wanted to read it in spite of the hype. I’ve read other books by Bloom, though my library’s order has gotten a little unwieldy, and those books predate my goodreads and booklikes blogs.

 

The oft-quoted first line of this book and the intriguing cover provide a sparkling entrance into this tale of an extraordinary, unconventional family. In fact, to call them a family is perhaps overstating the scrappy bunch described here. About halfway through, I decided this book was really the love child of Armistead Maupin and John Irving. I will admit that my secret prude self was a little unnerved by the unsparing descriptions in the first half of the book, and I was not endeared to some of the main characters until I got past that. To be fair, I am not a fan of any kind of explicit scenes in a book. I think I have a pretty good imagination, and the author giving me details most often turns down the excitement for me, which I’m guessing is contrary to their intent. Honestly, I was embarrassed even typing all of that. But there you have it.

 

In any case, while I found a huge amount of this book improbable, I loved it despite it’s minor flaws. The irony is that it was the minor characters who led me to accept, and finally appreciate the major ones. And when I did begin to really think about this sorry, impossibly messy, bizarre excuse for a family, I realized that I cared about them. When I brushed my teeth in the morning I wondered what absurd scheme they would think of next. When I went to bed at night, I thought about how ridiculously impossible it was that Iris would have even one career as an actress, but I rooted for her anyway, and gloried in her second act. During the day I worried about Eva, who bore most of the burdens in this story, and I prayed for more of those small moments of beauty that seemed to find her along the way. And when I finished I had to admit that it was worth the hype, in it’s sloppy, beautiful, perfectly rendered way. Lucky us.

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review 2014-09-01 19:41
Lucky Us Review
Lucky Us - Amy Bloom

This is a hard book to review because, on the one hand, it is a shapeless mess, filled with wildly improbable events, and ends by even more improbably tying everything up into a neat bow. But on the other hand, once I got into it I could not stop reading. I liked Eva and Iris in spite of myself. And it boasts a killer opening: "My father’s wife died. My mother said we should drive down to his place and see what might be in it for us."

 

I don't think this is great literature, and nothing like as good as Amy Bloom's short stories, but I ultimately found it irresistible.

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