logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Another-Man\'s-Treasure
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-07-27 05:43
Treasure Hunt House
Treasure Hunt House: Lift the Flaps and Solve the Clues… - Kate Davies,Becca Stadtlander

I meet a couple of friends once a week for coffee/chai/chocolate and today one of them said "want to go to the bookstore afterwards?"

 

...

 

I assumed it was a rhetorical question.  Anyway, this friend has 2 small kids so we of course gravitated to the kids section, where she bought nothing, and I bought this book.

 

For myself. 

 

It has flaps. 

 

It has clues.

 

It has riddles.

 

Did I mention it had flaps?  Flaps are almost as good as pop-ups!  

 

The book is beautiful, with a gorgeous spread and multiple flaps for each room of a house owned by an obviously very wealthy Great Aunt Martha.  Behind each flap is a little fact about the object on the flap and they cover a multitude of subjects: art, music, inventions, history, and fashion.  

 

Each spread also contains a clue to one of the flaps - this was, unfortunately, the most disappointing aspect of the book as the clues seemed easy to the point of insulting.  Yes, yes, this is supposed to be a kids book, so the clues reflect that, I know.  But the clues' simplicity seem disproportionate to the relative maturity of the facts the other flaps contain.  There are a few concepts (like BC and AD, or royal executions as examples) that  imply a higher level of education than clues that consist of "Stop Press! Read all about it! The answer is here in black and white!", which is easy enough that I don't even have to tell you the answer.  Although perhaps in this digital age I'm giving kids too much credit.  

 

Regardless, the facts were great but the clues too easy.  But the book is lovely and I can't wait to show it to my nieces.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-07-15 23:40
The (Original) Tower Treasure by Franklin W. Dixon
The Tower Treasure - Franklin W. Dixon,Leslie McFarlane

Almost a year to the day I read the 1959 'The Tower Treasure' I came across this facsimile edition of the original 1927 novel. What makes the difference? In a word:

Bowdlerize: To remove material that is considered improper or offensive from (a text or account), especially with the result that the text becomes weaker or less effective. - Oxford Living Dictionary

The Strathmeyer Syndicate under Harriet Strathmeyer Adams revised the Hardy Boys and the Nancy Drew series in the late 1950s. This was intended to update language and address some legitimate complaints about racist characterizations and, less legitimate, behavioral issues with the young detectives. The Hardy Boys, all-American and daring, became toadies to American institutions and any youthful impertinence of theirs towards authority and each other was scrubbed away. Nancy Drew fared worse, her yachtish, upper crust background was toned down, but so was much of her independent spirit.

'The Tower Treasure' as it appeared in 1927 is a very different novel. There was a loss of some 40-odd pages and many aspects of the plot were completely rewritten. The Hardy Boys are still the two sons of famed detective Fenton Hardy and on an errand for him, they witness a reckless driver who turns out to have stolen a car from their friend Chet. Later, a robbery is reported at the Tower Mansion and a friend's father is implicated. They get involved in the case, track down the thief and discover where the treasure is hidden. The 1959 version shortens the direct involvement of the boys in some more dangerous elements of the case and demonstrates almost a mania for wigs. Wigs are important to the case, but the 1927 version understandably doesn't have the boys going immediately to one of Bayport's three male wig shops. That's a leap that should occur later in a case.

Along with plot elements being condensed, descriptive language was cut. The 1959 story begins with the boys being chased down on their motorcycles by a speeding car. The original takes some time to introduce the boys and their hometown. Mealtimes are important, and 'Redwall'-worthy descriptions of tables groaning with food. Characterization was different, too. The wealthy Adelia Applegate is played for laughs because of her eccentric fashion, but it seems kinder in 1927, even if she is more sympathetic, providing an 'honorable alibi', in the revised version. Women don't play a significant role at all in either of them, mostly being providers of food.

There was one objectionable piece in the original book. This was, at the suggestion of their friend Tony Prito, to use the fears of an Italian immigrant to provide cover for a distraction to keep the Chief of Police out of the case. Threatened by 'the Black Hand', Rocco is too-ready to believe a ticking box on his farm stand is a bomb. The revised version has the boys kindly offer to watch a grocer's store and pretended a fire in the backyard incinerator was out of control and thus kept a buffoon private eye (can't have the police look ridiculous) away from the case.

I have no argument for the value of that particular scene, but the overall effect of the change to the books was a reduction of quality. There is no rich language left in the Hardy Boys series after the changes were made, and Frank and Joe themselves became indistinguishable from each other apart from their hair and ages. This was such a revelation that I've begun actively collecting the early books with their original text.

Next: The House on the Cliff

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-02 23:07
Book, Line, and Sinker by Jenn McKinlay
Book, Line and Sinker - Jenn McKinlay

I'll start by saying ignore the back of the book. The publisher's description is incorrect - although Charlie found the body, he was never one of the prime suspects.

Briar Creek is in an upheaval after a salvage company arrives with plans to dig up Captain Kidd's buried treasure, which can supposedly be found somewhere on Pirate Island. It sounds too amazing to be true, except that Mr. Riordan, the owner of the salvage company, has Captain Kidd's very own treasure map. The treasure hunt could turn Pirate Island into a huge tourist attraction, but it would also cause ecological damage. While Milton Duffy, a well-known and well-liked member of the Friends of the Library, tries to protect the island, Trudi Hargrave, the head of Briar Creek's tourism department, does everything she can to help Riordan's work move forward. Then Trudi turns up murdered, and Lindsey finds herself in the thick of things as usual.

This is probably the best book in the series so far. I loved the way the mystery tied in with Briar Creek's history. If I had one complaint about the way things worked out, it was that it took a lot longer than I expected for Trudi to finally be murdered. Which sounds terrible, but waiting so long for the death I knew was supposed to happen made the book drag a little. Plus, Trudi was kind of annoying.

The fact that Sully and Lindsey were finally dating didn't lessen Sully's appeal. I was happy to see that Sully was still giving Beth rides and waiting to make sure she got into her house okay before driving off. Little things like that really demonstrated that he wasn't just being nice in the previous books in order to spend more time with Lindsey. He also handled the sudden appearance of Lindsey's ex-fiance, John, surprisingly well. I expected aggravating amounts of jealousy, and instead he opted to trust Lindsey, stand back (mostly), and let her deal with John in her own way. Unfortunately,

McKinlay opted to throw all of this out the window at the end of the book. It was very sudden and felt out of character for Sully, even taking into account the amount of stress he was under.

(spoiler show)


I continued to like Officer Emma Plewicki - I hope she gets more page-time in future books. The real surprise, however, was Chief Daniels. In the first book he was a stereotypical small town cop, too focused on his initial assumptions to even consider other possibilities. In this latest book, he had visibly mellowed, and I actually found myself liking him.

This was a great entry in the series, although I'm worried about what the ending will mean for the next book. Crossing my fingers that McKinlay doesn't drag this development out too long.

Extras:

  • The Briar Creek Library Guide to Crafternoons
  • Readers Guide for The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Lindsey's pattern for her cross-stitch sampler ("Books are my homeboys.")
  • Recipe for Charlene's cucumber cups stuffed with feta

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-05-08 06:27
Yuletide Treasure by Andrea Kane
Yuletide Treasure - Andrea Kane

Four-year-old Noelle is a handful. Such a handful in fact, no family in the county wants to raise her and they keep returning her to her embittered uncle, until one day he snaps and decides to acquire a live-in governess for the girl. And he's adamant in accomplishing his goal, even if it means he has to marry the unsuspecting "victim".


This was a story about a spoiled brat of a child in need of a good thrashing, a brooding hero in need of a good smack on the head with a shovel, and a saint of a heroine that heals them both with her love and brings all of them together as a family just in time for the holidays.

It made my teeth ache with all the sugar, but it accomplished its goal of making me go "awww" in the end.

It was definitely too short, making the plot appear hole-y. The characters never really got the chance to shone through and this severe underdeveloped failed in making me know them and empathize with them, which caused huge disbelief in how easily it was all resolved (all thanks to love).

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-30 00:49
Nyx's Pixie (A Dragon's Treasure #2) by K.M. Mahoney 4 Star Review
Nyx's Pixie - K.M. Mahoney

In a world of beauty and magic, the Draak are an elite force, sworn to protect king and country. But with no wars and a king powerful enough that none want to challenge him, the life of an immortal warrior can be more dull than deadly. Until one lonely dragon finds a human mate. Suddenly, the king’s warriors are falling in love one after another. Seamus, king of the Fae, would be happy for his men, if it weren’t for that niggling worry in the back of his mind. It is said that a mated dragon gains abilities to protect his mate, and a dragon with a Treasure—a mate that is a dragon’s perfect match in every way—is strongest of all.

Everything happens for a reason. If the Draak are growing more powerful, then something is coming. Whatever it is, Seamus fears it could very well destroy the harmony he has worked so hard to bring to Faerie.

 

Review

 

I really like the world KM Mahoney has created in this book.

Pol is a delightful hero because he is underestimated all the time. His secret powers are amazing and he is a pixie which grand.

Nyx is a grumpy dragon shifter but he always treat Pol as an equal. 

The plot outside the love story is less intersting but I like this couple.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?