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text 2021-01-18 07:42
Free E-book - FOREST - Love, Loss, Legend

FREE E-BOOK

 

FOREST - Love, Loss, Legend

 

Free 'til January 19, 2021 at

https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU

 

Matt Bennett grew up in a dying town on the edge of the rainforest on the west coast of Canada. He knows the dark secrets behind that impenetrable wall of green where species can come to life, thrive and die without anyone except God ever knowing they ever existed. Lost gold, lost love and lost hope compels Matt to return home. The Forest is waiting.

 

 

As soon as they can they plan to leave behind the small town and small minds of Pitt Landing. They will embrace life and experience the world, maybe even change it.

 

Man plans, God laughs.

 

Raminder’s father has a stroke and her commitment to her family means she must postpone her plans and stay in Pitt Lake. It’s just the opposite for Matt. A family tragedy leaves irreconcilable differences between him and his father and forces him to leave. They promise to reunite, but life happens.

 

Twelve years later, Matt is an acclaimed war correspondent. He’s seen it all and it’s left him with post-traumatic stress, a gastric ulcer, and an enlarged liver. He’s never been back to Pitt Landing though the memory of Raminder and their love has more than once kept him sane.

 

He’s at his desk in the newsroom, recuperating from his last assignment and current hangover and reading a letter from his father, the first contact they’ve had in over a decade. It talks about a legendary lost gold mine, a map leading to it, and proof in a safety deposit box back in Pitt Lake. He’s sent it to Matt in case something happens to him and cautions his son to keep it a secret.

 

Matt is about to dismiss the letter when the telephone rings. It’s Raminder telling him his father has disappeared somewhere in the wilderness that surrounds Pitt Lake.

 

Lost gold, lost love and lost hope compels Matt to return home to Pitt Landing, a dying town on the edge of the rainforest on the west coast of Canada. Will he find any of these, or does something else await him?

 

Free 'til January 19, 2021 at

https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU

 

#books #bookworm #twitterbooks #newbooksnetwork #goodreads #amreading #readingcommunity #booklovers #newfiction #readers #read #environment #conservation #climatechange #endangeredspecies #habitatdestruction #Interracial #multicultural #environmentalfiction #ecofi #Mystery #romance #Sasquatch

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text 2020-02-29 06:57
FreeEbook of FOREST - Love, Loss, Legend

If you missed your chance to download a

 

Free Ebook of FOREST - Love, Loss, Legend

 

here's another chance,

but only 'til midnight tonight. https://amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU

 

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review 2018-02-09 00:00
The Sasquatch Murder (A Love Story)
The Sasquatch Murder (A Love Story) - Jeffery Viles Like lickin’ honey off a thorn tree

When MsWas sent out the email offering free copies of The Sasquatch Murder, I knew I had to have one. About six months ago, a new coffee shop opened about a block from my house. It’s called Coffee for Sasquatch. I had visions of reading the book under the giant wall sculpture of Sasquatch, as if she’s reading over my shoulder. That didn’t quite happen, but I am writing this review while drinking coffee and glancing up at Big Sassy herself.

I’m not quite sure how to talk about this book. It’s not good. Style and tone are all over the place. Some passages were clearly added to pad out the word count, much like a high school book report adding a lot of completely and ridiculously and superfluously long adverbs to get to the end of that second or third page. It’s full of clichés; one of the characters is literally described as speaking in old-timey clichés, and Hee-Haw-Howdy, does he ever (see: this review's title). The dialogue is painful and commits one of the cardinal sins of fiction: the characters narrate out loud to each other what they’re doing, while they’re doing it. It’s got some cringe-inducing, Mickey-Rooney-in-Breakfast-at-Tiffany’s-level racism in dealing with the few non-white, non-American, completely disposable characters. Much of what happens is preposterous and unbelievable and just plain wrong.

It’s the kind of book I’d like to crucify by channeling the gods and goddesses of Pajiba snark and filth, past and present. Up until about a third of my way through, that’s what I was planning, and then a few things happened. I looked up the publisher and saw that it’s mostly for self-publishing, which made sense. I read the author blurb, and he’s had about six different careers. I can 100% identify with that. I’m in my early-mid-40’s (shut up, it’s a thing) and trying to become a real writer like I always wanted but was too afraid. I get it.

And I also realized that I’d accepted the book for what it was, not what I thought it should be. It didn’t get better. Good god, no. But I started to have fun reading it. He’s terrible with people and dialogue. It's a murder without a murder, let alone mystery, and (a love story) without romance. But it somehow turned into so-bad-it’s-funny instead of so-bad-it’s-painful. His descriptions of the Pacific Northwest landscape are good enough that if he paid as much attention to everything else through a few (dozen) rewrites, he might have a decent novel. No. I take that back. It'd still be terrible and probably not as fun.

I freely admit that the free copy may have influenced my review. If I’d bought this book, it would probably be in shreds at the bottom of my recycle bin right now. Sasquatch deserves better. I can’t exactly recommend it, but I’ve read far worse this year.

(This review was original published as part of Cannonball Read 10. I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.)
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review 2018-02-09 00:00
The Sasquatch Murder (A Love Story)
The Sasquatch Murder (A Love Story) - Jeffery Viles Like lickin’ honey off a thorn tree

When MsWas sent out the email offering free copies of The Sasquatch Murder, I knew I had to have one. About six months ago, a new coffee shop opened about a block from my house. It’s called Coffee for Sasquatch. I had visions of reading the book under the giant wall sculpture of Sasquatch, as if she’s reading over my shoulder. That didn’t quite happen, but I am writing this review while drinking coffee and glancing up at Big Sassy herself.

I’m not quite sure how to talk about this book. It’s not good. Style and tone are all over the place. Some passages were clearly added to pad out the word count, much like a high school book report adding a lot of completely and ridiculously and superfluously long adverbs to get to the end of that second or third page. It’s full of clichés; one of the characters is literally described as speaking in old-timey clichés, and Hee-Haw-Howdy, does he ever (see: this review's title). The dialogue is painful and commits one of the cardinal sins of fiction: the characters narrate out loud to each other what they’re doing, while they’re doing it. It’s got some cringe-inducing, Mickey-Rooney-in-Breakfast-at-Tiffany’s-level racism in dealing with the few non-white, non-American, completely disposable characters. Much of what happens is preposterous and unbelievable and just plain wrong.

It’s the kind of book I’d like to crucify by channeling the gods and goddesses of Pajiba snark and filth, past and present. Up until about a third of my way through, that’s what I was planning, and then a few things happened. I looked up the publisher and saw that it’s mostly for self-publishing, which made sense. I read the author blurb, and he’s had about six different careers. I can 100% identify with that. I’m in my early-mid-40’s (shut up, it’s a thing) and trying to become a real writer like I always wanted but was too afraid. I get it.

And I also realized that I’d accepted the book for what it was, not what I thought it should be. It didn’t get better. Good god, no. But I started to have fun reading it. He’s terrible with people and dialogue. It's a murder without a murder, let alone mystery, and (a love story) without romance. But it somehow turned into so-bad-it’s-funny instead of so-bad-it’s-painful. His descriptions of the Pacific Northwest landscape are good enough that if he paid as much attention to everything else through a few (dozen) rewrites, he might have a decent novel. No. I take that back. It'd still be terrible and probably not as fun.

I freely admit that the free copy may have influenced my review. If I’d bought this book, it would probably be in shreds at the bottom of my recycle bin right now. Sasquatch deserves better. I can’t exactly recommend it, but I’ve read far worse this year.

(This review was original published as part of Cannonball Read 10. I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.)
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review 2018-01-18 00:00
The Sasquatch Murder (A Love Story)
The Sasquatch Murder (A Love Story) - Jeffery Viles

“At the beginning of beginnings there was only ∞, which was darkness multiplied by nothingness. The darkness was eternal and unchallenged until ∞ divided
nothingness by zero. A sound not unlike a faint brass trumpet note pierced the void, and light issued forth. Darkness could not subdue the light. Whatever
was not darkness was light. The future had a future. Within the light were particles that contained excitable atoms held together in an electron cloud.”

Talk about moving from the general to the specific! The above paragraph, the first in the “Prologue” to The Sasquatch Murder suggests an epic with a cosmic scope is underway.

Nope. Instead, after a crunched history of the origins of the universe through the early varieties of humankind, we end up in a rainstorm in a forest where Jake Holly and his horse try to escape the downpour. There, Jake accidently fires his rifle when he’s startled by a strange couple of beasts copulating on the forest floor. In short order, Jake learns he’s killed a female Sasquatch and wounded her mate.

Trying to do the right thing, Jake takes the corpse to his hometown of Aurora, Washington where a number of subplots begin. For one, we meet Jessica, Jake’s lawyer girlfriend who is 15 years his junior. She’s very supportive. We meet her prosecuting attorney father who dislikes their relationship and quickly has Jake arrested for murder.

Strangely, a local boy sees Jake, Jessica, and a local mortician take the corpse into a funeral home and begins to blog about it. Even more strangely, journalists from as far away as India and Japan read the boy’s blog and come running to track down the story. On top of that, the president of the U.S. gets wind of the story and calls the prosecuting attorney and asks him to suppress the story in the name of national security. The president sends a special unit called the PNG (Paranormal Group) to Aurora to put a lid on the situation.

Meanwhile, many of the townspeople have heard about the body in the morgue and want a look at it. After all, confirmation that Sasquatch, or Bigfoot, exists would be something to put Aurora on the map. And all this happens in just a day or so of the killing.

In addition to all these balls in the air, author Jeffrey Viles tosses in more digressions, character sketches, and unrelated scenes than I’ve ever seen in one book. Throw in the actions of the natural world from Elminio to clouds of volcanic ash and smoke belched out from Mount St. Helen’s to a posse of 16 angry Sasquatch who, for the first time, gather together and march into a human town through a thick fog to reclaim the body of one of their own.

Despite the padding, the touching of so many bases, and improbable plot twists, there’s much in The Sasquatch Murder to attract an audience. After the “Prologue” and very descriptive first chapter, the story is told with an engaging, personable style. Viles fleshes out some very likeable characters, especially Jake and Jessica whose romance is the “love story” in the book’s sub-title.

This one sure looks like a stand-alone yarn with no likely sequels. It’s a family-friendly story, appropriate for a YA readership.

This review first appeared at BookPleasures.com on Jan. 18, 2018 at:
http://1clickurls.com/sXabiJ2


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