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text 2018-08-15 20:16
Nazia Hassan 5 iconic songs that made Pakistan’s eternal pop star.

Pakistan’s pop music icon, Nazia Hassan may have been passed away since 18 years. But there is no single day, which goes without her countless fans remembering her eternal vocals. Whether it was her melancholic number Lekin Mera Dil or upbeat disco vibes with Aap Jaisa Koi. She was the first true-blue female singing superstar of Pakistan. Today, we remember her most iconic songs that made the world fall in love with her through, who once sold 60 million records worldwide.
Disco Dee wane
There is no list could be complete without mentioning and remembering Nazia Hassan. Her super-popular, Disco Dee wane was released in 1981 went on to become a chartbuster throughout the world. After 30 years. it was so much reworked into Bollywood’s Student of the Year!
Boom Boom
Next is the track from her mega-hit album of the same name, Boom Boom. Which became the 80s Pepsi Generation voice. Where Michael Jackson, singer of the west had taken the limelight. In Pakistan, no one ever end up not singing the catchy chorus because it had to be Nazia Hassan with this track.
Aap Jaisa Koi
In India the song "Aap Jaisa koi" made Nazia Hassan a household name. This song Aap jaisa koi become the singer’s first ever song in Film fare award Bollywood. People remember the film by this song, Qurbaani and Zeenat Aman’s iconic dance moves. That was fantastic.
Dosti
When we together with our siblings there is only one song. that made us fall in love with the sibling duo, Zoheb and Nazia Hassan, it has to be Dosti. A melodious song that went on to become the anthem for the budding pop scene was this dosti songs in Pakistan. After so many years this dosti song is still one of the most iconic songs by the two.
Dum Dum Dee Dee
Nazia Hassan probably the most ever psychedelic song, Dum Dum Dee Dee’s Alice in Wonderland theme. It was every Pakistani youth’s favorite music video growing up!
If the catchy tunes get stuck in your head! We are not responsible for it.

http://scandals.pk/

Source: scandals.pk
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review 2018-06-19 18:47
Friendly advice
Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear Sugar - Cheryl Strayed

Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life From Dear Sugar by Cheryl Strayed is a collection of the letters and responses that were printed in the advice column, "Dear Sugar", from The Rumpus. The topics range from love and marriage, cheating, identity (sexual and otherwise), parenting, relationships with parents/children, grief, and abuse. Strayed does not pull her punches and she doesn't apologize for it either. She somewhat softens the blows of her blunt advice and observations with endearments like 'sweet pea' and 'honey bun' but instead of sounding condescending it feels like it could be delivered by a trusted confidant. Lest you think that she gives this advice from a rather standoffish perspective it is often conveyed through her own personal experiences and struggles. When the column was originally written her identity was unknown which makes the intimacy and the rawness of the letter writers and her response to them such a unique and wonderful thing. If you've ever experienced turmoil in any area of your life (and you'd have to because that's just a natural part of things) then reading such real, honest advice delivered with love and respect is a welcome breath of fresh air. I laughed, cried, and goggled with incredulity while reading this book. It's an excellent palate cleanser if you're in a book reading rut or a great way to kick start your summer reading adventure. ;-) 10/10

 

The inner flap contains some great quotes. [Source: Cook, Wine, & Thinker!]

 

What's Up Next: The American Way of Death Revisited by Jessica Mitford

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Condoleezza Rice: A memoir of my extraordinary, ordinary family and me by Condoleezza Rice

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2017-11-24 21:55
A great resource for writers of historical fiction, historians, and people who love social history and the Victorian period.
Life on the Victorian Stage: Theatrical Gossip - Nell Darby

Thanks to Alex from Pen & Sword for providing me with a review paperback copy of this book that I freely chose to review.

If you have been following my reviews for some time, you will be aware that I have read a number of the historical books published by Pen & Sword. I tend to be more interested in social history and how historical changes affected the lives of those who don’t always figure in the big History treatises. Being a lover of plays and a kin theatregoer, I was very curious about this book. Yes, theatre gossip was intriguing, but getting a sense of what life on the Victorian stage must have been like was my main interest. Although sometimes we discover that life has changed dramatically in a reasonably short period of times, some things do not seem to change much. And human curiosity and the love of gossip are among those things. If Victorians had no access to social media, there were plenty of newspapers and periodicals to keep them entertained, and actors were as much a subject of interest then as they are now.

The author does not follow a narrative or chooses a few big cases in this book, but rather illustrates the sheer amount of theatrical news that occupied the Victorian press of the time, not only in London but also in the provinces. As communications improved, newspapers even started featuring stories about actors in America (either natives or British authors touring there) and although sometimes the features lacked in detail (in some cases a suicide or a death would not feature the name of those involved) they were always after items that would attract the public’s attention. Darby divides the book into three parts: Part 1 deals with the business side of things (including such matters as licenses, libel, bankruptcy, breach of contract…), Part 2 looks at criminal lives (from blackmail and assault to prostitution and murder), and Part 3 delves into the personal lives of the actors (what we would probably consider gossip proper, although not all of it is gossip. The chapter on death and disaster deals with serious matter and also makes us look at security measures and disasters in theatres, bigamy seems to have been much more common than it is today, and personally I was fascinated by the chapter on breaches of promise, as I had not realise that there were laws that offered more protection to women in those circumstances than I would have expected).  Each chapter shares both, examples of standard cases of what would usually find its way into the newspapers (brief pieces with hardly any detail) and it dedicates more space to others that were better known, but no single case gets all the limelight. In many ways, this book is like a sampler, where people interested in the subject can learn more and be pointed in the right direction to research further.

The author’s style of writing is direct, and mostly allows the sources to do the talking. She provides sufficient background (on legal matters, the nature of performances, technical issues…) for readers to appreciate the items she discusses, and also some reflections on her own take on the materials. She notes how some periodicals, like The Era, were in a double-bind of sorts, as they tried hard to defend the profession of acting on the stage (that had a pretty bad reputation, especially in the case of women), insisting that actors were honourable and true professionals, whilst at the same time featured “sensational” news to attract readers. Although these days respectability is not a concept many people are worried about, it is true that the press has a hard time trying to reconcile the ideal of protectors of the truth, whilst fighting to keep the attention of the public by any means necessary. Is it possible to keep the moral high ground whilst publishing gossip and innuendo?

Although this is not, perhaps, a book for the general reading public, as I read I kept thinking about how useful this book would be to writers of historical fiction interested in the period (and not only for those considering using a theatrical background in their story but also for those thinking about the press of the time and even society at large) and to historians. Darby provides end notes full of details, both of the sources of her research and also of further information available. Although she mostly uses newspapers, she digs on the archives to confirm details such as names (as many actors and actresses used stage names and some of those were fairly popular) and discovers that Mark Twain wasn’t the only one whose death had been grossly exaggerated (deaths, marriages… were often misreported). The paperback also contains pictures that allow us to put faces to some of the names and help transport us to the era.

In sum, this is a book that will greatly assist writers, historians, and people passionate about the Victorian era and the history of the stage in the UK. It is a good starting point for those who want a general view of the topic and/or are looking for inspiration for their next story or research project. And if you just want to confirm that people’s love for gossip about the stars has not changed over the years, this is your book.

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text 2016-12-02 23:37
2 days left to win 1 of 200 e-book editions of The LOCAL RAG
The Local Rag - Rod Raglin

The LOCAL RAG

All Jim Mitchell wants to do is publish an honest newspaper - and not get killed for doing it.

 

UNTIL DECEMBER 4TH ONLY

Enter to win 1 of 200 e-book editions of The LOCAL RAG at

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and 1 of 2 paperbacks at

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The LOCAL RAG (E-book) is FREE ON AMAZON

 

Here's what the reviews are saying...

 

★★★★★ "A very well written media/political thriller. Lots of exciting scenarios, with several twists/turns and a huge set of unique characters to keep track of. This could also make another great political thriller movie, or better yet a mini TV series. A very easy rating of 5 stars."

 

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★★★★★ "Interesting plot, fast-moving story, well-developed characters. Not only well presented but also very realistic. A whole range of characters, with all their good and bad sides. Many twists and turns, not always with a happy ending. Rod Raglin is definitely good at writing and gripping the readers' attention from the very first page. He managed to put so many levels in this book - corruption, drugs, murder, threats, politics. Yet, there is also place for love and friendship. He not only presents his story, he challenges his readers to get actively involved, to start asking questions and reconsidering their own life decisions."

 

★★★★"Raglin’s Local Rag grips us with a dose of reality not seen on most major media. His story highlights the control over the minds of the public by special money factions. Readers have only to see similarities with today."

"...challenges readers with the ethics of seeking justice, money control, and the role of an independent media."

"... hits the reader with the overwhelming forces in our life."

-Tom Pope, Bookpleasures.com

 

 

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