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url 2020-05-15 12:49
R Random Forest - Ensemble Learning Methods in R - TechVidvan

R random Forest - What is Random Forest in R with practical implementation, Ensemble Learning methodes in R, Overfitting-Underfitting in R, Bagging in R,

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review 2020-05-14 15:43
A totally immersing and wonderful reading experience
The Glass House - Eve Chase

Thanks to Penguin UK - Michael Joseph and NetGalley for providing me an ARC copy of this book that I freely chose to review. This is the first time I’ve read one of Eve Chase’s novels, and I’m sure it won’t be the last one as I found it a totally immersing and wonderful experience.

The plot has something of the fairy tale (or of several fairy tales), as this is a dual-timeline story where we read about some events that took place in the early 1970s —although that part of the action (in fact, the whole book) has something timeless about it— and then others that are taking place in the present. The story is told from three different points of view, those of Rita (told in a deep third person, as readers are privy to her feelings and thoughts), a very tall nanny (they call her ‘Big Rita’) with a tragic past; Hera, one of her charges, an intelligent and troubled child (almost a teen), who is more aware of what is truly going on around her than the adults realise; and Sylvia, a recently separated woman, mother of an eighteen-year-old girl, Annie, and trying to get used to an independent lifestyle again. Both, Hera and Sylvia, tell the story in the first person, and the chapters alternate between the three narrators and the two timelines. Rita and Hera’s narratives start in the 1970s and are intrinsically linked, telling the story of the Harrington family and of a summer holiday in the family home in the Forest of Dean, intended as a therapeutic break for the mother of the family, which turns up to be anything but. Most readers will imagine that Sylvia’s story, set in the present, must be related to that of the other two women, but it is not immediately evident how. There are secrets, mysteries, adultery, murders, lost and found babies, romance, tragedy, accidents, terraria (or terrariums, like the lovely one in the cover of the book), cruelty, fire… The book is classed under Gothic fiction (and in many ways it has many of the elements we’d expect from a Victorian Gothic novel, or a fairy tale, as I said), and also as a domestic thriller, and yes, it also fits in that category, but with a lot more symbolism than is usual in that genre, a house in the forest rather than a suburban or a city home, and some characters that are larger than life.

Loss, grief, identity (how we define ourselves and how we are marked by family tradition and the stories we are told growing up), the relationship between mothers and daughters, and what makes a family a family are among the themes running through the novel, as are memory and the different ways people try to cope with trauma and painful past events.

I’ve mentioned the characters in passing, and although some of them might sound familiar when we start reading about them (Rita, the shy woman, too tall and scarred to be considered attractive, who seeks refuge in other people’s family; Hera, the young girl growing in a wealthy family with a mother who has mental health problems and a largely absent father; and Sylvia, a woman in her forties suddenly confronted with having to truly become an adult when both, her mother and her daughter need her), there is more to them than meets the eye, and they all grow and evolve during the novel, having to confront some painful truths in the process. I liked Rita and Sylvia from the beginning, even though I don’t have much in common with either of them, and felt sorry for Hera. Although the events and the story require a degree of suspension of disbelief greater than in other novels, the characters, their emotions, and their reactions are understandable and feel real within the remit of the story, and it would be difficult to read it and not feel for them.

I loved the style that offers a good mix of descriptive writing (especially vivid when dealing with the setting of the story, the forest, Devon, and the terrarium) and more symbolic and lyrical writing when dealing with the emotions and the state of mind of the characters. At times, we can almost physically share in their experiences, hear the noises in the woods, or smell the sea breeze. This is not a rushed story, and although the action and the plot move along at a reasonable pace, there is enough time to stop to contemplate and marvel at a fern, the feel of a baby’s skin, or the music from a guitar. This is not a frantic thriller but a rather precious story, and it won’t suit people looking for constant action and a fast pace. I’ve read some reviews where readers complained about feeling confused by the dual time lines and the different narrators, although I didn’t find it confusing as each chapter is clearly marked and labelled (both with mention of the time and the character whose point of view we are reading). I recommend anybody thinking about reading the book to check a sample first, to see if it is a good fit for their taste.

The ending… I’m going to avoid spoilers, as usual, but I liked the way everything comes together and fits in. Did I work out what was going on? Some of the revelations happen quite early, but some of the details don’t come to light until much later, and the author is masterful in the way she drops clues that we might miss and obscures/hides information until the right moment. I guessed some of the points, others I only realised quite close to the actual ending, but, in any case, I loved how it all came together, like in a fairy tale, only even better.

This is a novel for readers who don’t mind letting their imagination fly and who are not looking for a totally realistic novel based on fact. With wonderful characters, magnificent settings, many elements that will make readers think of fairy tales, and a Gothic feel, this is a great novel, and an author whose work I look forward to reading again in the near future.

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review 2020-04-21 05:25
REVIEW⇢ THE LAST WOMAN IN THE FOREST BY DIANE LES BEQUETS



SYNOPSIS FROM AUTHORS WEBSITE⇣
Twenty-six-year-old Marian Engstrom has found her true calling: working with rescue dogs to help protect endangered wildlife. Her first assignment takes her to the winter landscape of northern Alberta where, amid the punishing cold of the oil sands, she falls in love with her mentor, Tate Mathias. That following summer, while apart from each other on independent assignments, Marian receives the shattering news of Tate’s tragic death. Worse still is the aftermath in which she discovers disturbing inconsistencies about Tate’s life and begins to wonder if he could have been responsible for the unsolved murders of at least four women. Hoping to clear Tate’s name, Marian reaches out to a retired forensic profiler who is still tormented by the open cases. Her exploration becomes a meditation on memory and instinct, and an all-consuming quest to not only identify a killer but to understand herself and the man she loved.
From the breathtaking Rocky Mountains in Montana, to the vast deserts of Utah, to the lush rain forests of the Pacific Northwest, THE LAST WOMAN IN THE FOREST explores the darkest and most beautiful aspects of human nature and the natural world. Capturing this duality in prose that is both vivid and atmospheric–indeed the landscape is as alive as Marian herself–Les Becquets tests our notions of what it means to trust and to love and makes us feel deep in our bones the redemptive power of the wilderness.

 

 

BOOK TAGS

 THE WILDERNESS
 SERIAL KILLER MYSTERY 
 SOME AWKWARD ROMANCE
⤏ LIMITED, GRAPHIC DEPICTIONS OF RAPE & MURDER
 RESCUE DOGS 


 

BOOK DETAILS⇣

AUDIO PERFORMED BY EMILY RANKIN & ROBERT FASS, WITH CAMEO'S BY REBECCA LOWMAN, ALEX MCKENNA, MONIKA FELICE SMITH, & ERIN SPENCER
SOURCE LIBBY AUDIOBOOK (LIBRARY)
AUDIOBOOK LENGTH 11 HOURS, 29 MINUTES

 

MY THOUGHTS⇣

 
Have you ever had someone offer a ride when you're broke down on the side of the road???  This is the story of what could happen when you ignore your gut reaction and say yes, anyway.

The overall message the author is trying to portend with this story is a necessary one, but possibly one that we already know...and truthfully the execution of it was sort of off.  I don't know exactly what it was, but I found this to be a little awkward...from the romance between these two characters to her search for answers about him once he dies.  I also thought that the dogs they worked with would be more prominent in the story...I never really quite got what their job entailed.  As far as the mystery goes, I could foresee everything before it happened...and nothing really surprised me.

The narration was decently performed by the two main narrators.  It also had short vignettes from each of the killer's victims...these were seriously brutal to listen too, but I did like that each of them was performed by a different narrator.  There is a postscript at the end of the book where the author tells the reason for writing the story and what she researched and who helped her with research for the book and it was interesting.
 
 

MY RATING ✰STARS✰

 

BREAKDOWN⇣

 
 
Plot 4/5
Characters 2.5/5
The Feels 3.5/5
Pacing 3/5
Addictiveness 4/5
Theme, Tone or Intensity 3/5
Flow (Writing Style) 3/5
Twisty-ness/Mystery 3/5
Originality/Believability 3.5/5
Ending 3.7/5
 

 
 
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review 2020-04-05 14:46
Suicide Forest
Suicide Forest - Jeremy Bates

by Jeremy Bates

 

The first book of Bates' Scariest Places on Earth series. Though the stories are fictional, they are all set in real places that are creepy or scary in some way.

 

Suicide Forest is just outside of Tokyo, Japan and is actually called Aokigahara Forest, but commonly known as Suicide Forest because it's a place where people go to die. Bodies are often found hanging from trees. There are stories about restless spirits haunting the forest, as you would expect in such a place.

 

A group of friends decide to explore the forest when weather reports divert them from their original plan of climbing Mount Fuji. They end up camping there, after running into some other people doing the same thing. They encounter natural hazards in the forest in their quest to find morbid evidence of the forest's reputation and there is some antagonism between Ethan and his girlfriend's male friend, John Scott, who came along results in typical male posturing and competition.

 

When they find the abandoned belongings of a woman, mysterious screams are heard in the night and one of their companions is found hanging dead from a tree in the morning, the situation quickly turns into one of survival in a massive forest where they are lost and running out of supplies.

 

The book is very well written and scary to the point that I had to stop after a few chapters at a time. Horror enthusiasts will love it! The foreign setting and concerns over whether the authorities would respond in the way those in the characters' own countries would lends a sense of immediacy and disorientation in an already engrossing story.

 

The explanation for what was happening is close enough to plausible to make a good story as well, but one question was left unanswered and I'm docking half a star for that. Otherwise this is an easy 5 star read.

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text 2020-02-15 09:50
FREE E-BOOK of FOREST - Love, Loss, Legend

 

 

FREE

FOREST - Love, Loss, Legend

 

Lost gold, lost love and lost hope compels Matt to return home to Pitt Landing, a dying town on the edge of a rainforest on the west coast of Canada. The forest is waiting.

 

 

 

TWO DAYS ONLY - February 15 and 16

 

For your free download of FOREST go to

https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU

 

WATCH THE PROMO VIDEO

https://animoto.com/play/M2iUOD0ixd3hsU9TJnqQOw

 

 

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