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review 2020-04-13 18:38
Review: Tevinter Nights by Bioware

 

Ancient horrors. Marauding invaders. Powerful mages. And a world that refuses to stay fixed.

 

Welcome to Thedas.

 

From the stoic Grey Wardens to the otherworldly Mortalitasi necromancers, from the proud Dalish elves to the underhanded Antivan Crow assassins, Dragon Age is filled with monsters, magic, and memorable characters making their way through dangerous world whose only constant is change.

 

Dragon Age: Tevinter Nights brings you fifteen tales of adventure, featuring faces new and old, including:

 

"Three Trees to Midnight" by Patrick Weekes
"Down Among the Dead Men" by Sylvia Feketekuty
"The Horror of Hormak" by John Epler
"Callback" by Lukas Kristjanson
"Luck in the Gardens" by Sylvia Feketekuty
"Hunger" by Brianne Battye
"Murder by Death Mages" by Caitlin Sullivan Kelly
"The Streets of Minrathous" by Brianne Battye
"The Wigmaker" by Courtney Woods
"Genitivi Dies in the End" by Lukas Kristjanson
"Herold Had the Plan" by Ryan Cormier
"An Old Crow's Old Tricks" by Arone Le Bray
"Eight Little Talons" by Courtney Woods
"Half Up Front" by John Epler
"Dread Wolf Take You" by Patrick Weekes

 

Like all anthologies, it’s hit or miss.  The main appeal of the book comes from not just being a return to Thedas, but the range of adventures and information it gives.  Set after the events of Inquisition, we get a glimpse of what the Venatori have been up to, insights into how the Mortalitasi function in Nevarra, a little Grey Warden-ing, some Crows in action and a few cameos from some favorites like Dorian Pavus and Cassandra Pentaghast. 

 

It’s a mixed bag, but it adds to the lore & mythology of Dragon Age as well as a few teases into what might be coming next.  Good stuff.

 

 

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review 2020-04-03 11:16
Blood of Elves
Blood of Elves - Andrzej Sapkowski

I always read a lot of books at the same time. Still, I am not used to reading series back to back. Usually there are quite some other books that creep in between. It is rather rare that I am so engrossed in a series I read them all one after the other.

I think Blood of Elves suffered a little because it was the third Witcher book I was reading in one month. I wanted to read it, after the first two short story-books this was the first full novel. However, I found that I thought it was a little bit too much at this time.

Blood of Elves sort of starts where Sword of Destiny finished, but I had the same problems I had with the first two books. It is nice, although it did not feel like too much happened in this one, but not much more than that. I will continue the series, but first take a little brake.

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review 2020-03-07 07:05
Review: The Unspoken Name by A.K. Larkwood
The Unspoken Name - A. K. Larkwood

I must say it has been a long time since I was as disappointed in a book as I am in this one. My expectations for this book were sky high. I had seen a lot of good buzz about it and the premise sounded amazing. A high fantasy with orcs and elves, mages and assassins? And brought to me by Tor Books? Sign me up! Here just have my money!! Then, in the end, it was just a giant feeling of “whomp whomp”. That makes me sad. Especially because this book had a ton of potential.

 

Csorwe had the potential to be an amazing character. She was raised her entire life to know that she will be sacrificed to her god on a specific day and that is her only purpose. And then, at the last moment, she is offered an alternate destiny. A chance to become an assassin, a sword hand for a wronged wizard who wants his power back. And she just so happens to be an orc priestess too. Unfortunately, she was also incredibly boring. I had no emotional connection to her at all. Probably because we only see her in action packed moments. We only see her in the moments preceding battle, the midst of battle and the immediate aftermath of battle. Characters are created in the little moments. The moments that the character spends training, planning, preparing, and theorizing about what is to come. There was absolutely none of that in this book. We go from Csorwe leaving behind her destiny to several years later when she’s already largely trained. We are told that she really enjoyed training with a mercenary group, but we never actually see that happen. We are told that she is a remarkable fighter and assassin. Except she only does this actual task one or two times, neither of which could be considered wildly successful. Mostly she gets her ass kicked. To the brink of death. Seemingly every day.

 

Tal’s character was slightly more fleshed out but I got the feeling that he was there purely as an adversary for Csorwe and occasional comic relief. That was a shame because I felt like there was untapped potential there. Shuthmili was a good character and I found myself connecting with her at times, but since she isn’t a major factor in a lot of the book it was hard to develop any lasting feelings about her.  And her romance with Csorwe was very sweet.

 

The most memorable character was Oranna. I had some deep feelings about her and thought she was the best character as a whole. She actually felt like a real person instead of a cardboard stand-in for a real person. She was wonderful although I don’t think that I ever completely grasped her motivation behind everything that she did. I know what she told us her motivation was but it seemed hollow and shallow. I suspect it wasn’t entirely the truth.

 

The writing was technically solid and I found myself reading large swathes of pages at a time without realizing the time was going by. That was the good part. The problem was the disjointed nature of the narrative. We start with Csorwe at 14, then we jumped a few years to about 17 or 18, then jump again to her at around 22. Every time we arrive in a new time period, things are already figured out and a plan is already well underway for what needs to happen. It was confusing. I never got a chance to get invested in a particular narrative before it was over and we moved on to the next thing. There was also absolutely no showing in this book, just telling. We are told that people felt a certain way. We are told that things work a certain way. We are told that this is the answer to the entire thing. We are told that this is what will happen next. It made things very boring and without a connection to the story.

 

I am not sure why the author tried to make different races of beings. I forgot that Csorwe was an orc for most of the book because it is never mentioned and it doesn’t influence how she behaves, speaks or her interactions with others. Similarly, I completely forgot that Tal was an elf until I was writing this review and remembered some tidbit about his ears and skin color. I don’t need Tolkien levels of race building here. Frankly I am glad it wasn’t because Tolkien’s 4 page narratives about a tree bore the bejesus out of me (I know, I pronounced myself a heretic on that one, haha!). But you need to give me something because these characters were painfully human.

 

Because of all this showing and not telling, I also have no idea how this world looks or how it works. I got some vague stuff about gates that remind me of Stargate and some kind of ship. It is alternately described as a wooden ship or a barge, and has an “alchemical engine” which gives me steampunk airship vibes. But I have no idea if any of these interpretations are correct. The world itself was not fleshed out well. So as interesting as a Maze that eats dead worlds is, unless you can describe it for me then it’s just an interesting idea and nothing else.

 

One aspect that I loved was the pantheon of gods, how they are worshipped and the magic system of this world. That was all completely stellar. I am always on board with some good ole fashioned god worship, complete with sacrifices. I also really enjoyed the rules for using magic in this world. Magic comes with a price, exacting a physical toll on the user. So there is a delicate balance that must be struck and maintained. That was all fabulous and one of the big things that kept me going on this book.

 

My final issue is that I have no idea why this book was called The Unspoken Name. We have the Unspoken One, Csorwe’s patron god. But they are only referred to as the Unspoken One. Never as anything else. The term unspoken name weren’t actually in the book until page 435 and it seemed to be mostly used as an exasperated expletive. “We need to think. We need to – Oh, by the twelve hundred Unspeakable names, what in hell is that?” This probably shouldn’t get on my nerves but it did.

 

In the end, this book was okay. It shows some signs of brilliance and I can see that the author is very talented. But that brilliance was not curated properly and so the final result ends up being messy and disappointing.

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review 2020-02-20 03:55
Geralt having a child of surprise
Blood of Elves - Andrzej Sapkowski

Geralt after united with Ciri and promised not to leave her again bring her to be trained as a witcher. 

 

But they didn't use any poison on her that make her mutate into something else. After all, she is the first girl to be trained as a witcher and Geralt and his mates didn't know how to deal with girl.

 

Triss came to help. And they were not that good at girl's things. 

 

Ciri the Lion Cub is the princess who would now either be killed or be found and forced into marriage to get more power.

 

Geralt has to keep her self. The training of Ciri as witcher is fun. Then she is sent to the temple for girls to be trained for their magic ability. Ciri has not able to do magic. Only Yennefer recognized her blood and her potential. So the story is about how Ciri become the apprentice of Yennefer.

 

The characters developments and the landscape of the story is pretty rich. It is not surprise that it is both made into video games and TV series. 

 

The characters are likable and they are in difficult situations. So readers would like to know what's happen next. 

 

Another 4.5 stars read. 

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text 2020-02-14 03:18
The Adventurers Guild series
The Adventurers Guild - Zack Loran Clark,Nick Eliopulos,Johnny Heller
Twilight of the Elves - Zack Loran Clark,Nick Eliopulos
Night of Dangers - Zack Loran Clark,Nick Eliopulos

 

I listened to the first book in this series last summer and loved it. But I never got around to continuing the series. Last month, one of the girls at school told me that I had to read the second & third books because she loved them. I was able to borrow the audio of book 2 (Twilight of the Elves) but the third wasn't available in audio from the library. I loved the audio so much that I bought book 3 (Night of Dangers) from Audible.

 

This series is amazing and I loved it. It is a magical tale that emphasizes friendship and the importance of trust in the middle of a battle between the apprentices, monsters, and tricksters hiding in plain sight. In order to survive and win, the apprentices must come together and use their strengths to save each other and the town of Freestone.

 

The books are full of adventure, danger, compassion, and twists and turns you won't see coming. If you enjoy middle-grade fantasy stories, I predict you will love this series!

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