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review 2018-03-11 20:01
Dragon Sword and Wind Child by Noriko Ogiwara, translated by Cathy Hirano, illustrations by Miho Satake
Dragon Sword and Wind Child - Miho Satake,Noriko Ogiwara,Cathy Hirano

Fifteen-year-old Saya is the only survivor of an attack by the army of the God of Light on her village when she was a child. Although she occasionally dreams about the attack, she now lives with her adoptive parents in the village of Hashiba, which has accepted the God of Light and his immortal children, Princess Teruhi and Prince Tsukishiro. Saya has no memories of her birth parents and loves the Light just as much as any other person in Hashiba, so it's a shock when several strangers arrive and tell her that she's a princess of the Children of the Dark. Unlike the immortal Children of the God of Light, the Children of the Goddess of Darkness can die and then be reincarnated, and Saya is the reincarnation of the Water Maiden. Before she has a chance to truly process this, Prince Tsukishiro arrives and takes a sudden interest in her.

Saya is faced with several choices: she can become one of the prince's handmaidens and eventually his bride, knowing that he doesn't really love her; she can kill herself like the Water Maidens before her; or she can somehow find a way to escape. She chooses the third option and discovers both the Dragon Sword, a weapon so powerful it can kill gods, and Chihaya, a Child of the God of Light who is seen as a failure by his siblings because he has always been drawn to the Darkness.

I honestly didn't know where Ogiwara was going to go with this book, most of the time. Saya figured out that her love for Prince Tsukishiro was foolish surprisingly quickly, although it took a bit longer for her heart to catch up. Chihaya was...unexpected. I had caught the mention of a third Child of the God of Light, but I hadn't thought that Saya would be meeting him so soon and taking him along with her.

The immortals, Chihaya in particular, came across as somewhat alien. Chihaya had the ability to switch bodies with various animals and didn't seem to be aware, or maybe didn't care, that the animals wouldn't necessarily be okay if they got injured while he was using them. He could experience pain and certainly disliked it, but any injuries would usually disappear in a day or less. He cared about his horse and Saya, in that order, and I'm not sure he truly realized, during a good chunk of the book, that Saya could die.

The book's pacing was a bit slow for my tastes, but I liked reading about Saya's efforts to understand Chihaya. She had to struggle to convince the Children of the Goddess of Darkness to keep him free as he kept doing things that indicated he was more dangerous to have around than they'd initially thought. Watching how Chihaya changed as the story progressed was fascinating.

I wish, though, that Saya hadn't come across as more a supporting character than a main character. I went into the book expecting her to be more active. There were moments when she had choices to make and things to do, but mostly she existed to support Chihaya while he gradually came into his powers and got a better look at the Darkness he'd been drawn towards all his life. Saya supposedly had the power to pacify gods but never got to the point of being able to use them, unless her ability to connect with Chihaya counted.

I kind of wish this had been a friendship-only book, since I felt Chihaya and Saya worked best as friends, but I suppose their eventual romance fit with the "God of Light and Goddess of Darkness" theme. The way I felt about the two of them reminded me a little of how I felt about the sudden romance in Philip Pullman's The Amber Spyglass. It felt forced.

All in all, despite its problems this was pretty good. I look forward to the next book, although I wonder how it'll be related to this one. I don't recognize the character names in the description and, honestly, the way Dragon Sword and Wind Child ended makes it work just fine as a standalone.


The book includes two full-page, full-color illustrations. One is a larger version of the cover illustration.


(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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url 2018-01-19 06:12
The Immortal Lover
This incredibly handsome man with versicolored hair is like none other. His capability to enhance a woman; mortal or immortal is what has made him a legend before the creation of our world. He takes love but rarely, sincerely gives it. His hands and lips are sweltering hot but his heart is cold as ice. His heart is unable to be captured for it belongs to another. One he has sought since he lost her.
Down through the ages of human history his name has been heard and often feared. He's know by many names; king of hell, demon, destroyer, all which is wrong with the world. But many has known him in a different light. A tender light. He's the legendary lover that legends are made from. Many believe he may had been Casanova, himself or most definitely Don Juan. Some say he's actually Eros. But a few have known for sure and lived to tell the story. Few knows his heavenly name is Azazael. Most knows hm by his terrifying fallen name; which is Azazel.

After his fall from Grace he was thrown into hell. He became the epitome age old adage, "Heaven doesn't want me and hell is afraid I'll take over." For that's exactly what Azazel did. Took over and made himself the king of hell. He ruled the cthulhu realms with a relentless iron fist, he dethroned the lord of darkness and reign supreme for eons upon eons. He built cities, added structure. Turned hell not into a place of punishment if one obeyed him. Hell was no longer a place of punishment as to why heaven puled him out. Hell is supposed to be a place of punishment.

During his diabolical reign, there was one thing his heart never grew cold to and that was the love of his second wife whom he lost before falling from Grace. The severity of his many imprisonments and divine mind erasures have left his mind foggy to what she looked like but he remember her tender love for him. Driving her away has been his only regret.
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review 2017-10-12 16:26
Fun paranormal romance
Fox's Awakening (Enchanted Immortals Book 2) - F.G. Adams,Julia Goda

Fox's Awakening is the second book in the Enchanted Immortals Trilogy and picks up where book one, Aldin's Wish left off. While I would recommend reading the books in order to get the full impact of everything going on with these characters, it can be read as a standalone. 

Fox wasn't a major character in the first book, but he did make an impact and I was excited to see his story. The book is fast-paced with lots of action and plenty of steam as Fox and his goddesses get acquainted - umm, reacquainted? (Too much on that would give spoilers, so I'll just leave it alone.)

Adams is a talented writer and weaves an exciting tale with this second book in the trilogy. The story is told in multiple points of view and will keep you on your toes as things progress with Baako and a romance blooms.

All in all, this second book is a fun paranormal romance with lots of action to keep a reader turning pages. 

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review 2017-10-12 16:12
Good World Building
Aldin's Wish (Enchanted Immortals) (Volume 1) - F. G. Adams,Daryl Banner

Aldin's Wish is a fast-paced paranormal romance with the Immortals being the guardians of the human race. Well, most of them. There's always a baddie in the bunch. Aldin is such an endearing character, watching over his family in secret and helping out when needed. Of course, his world is turned upside down when he sees Wren. What follows is a steamy love story and plenty of action with our bad guy creating chaos.

There were a few repetitive phrases that should've been caught by a proof-reader, but that aside, it was still an exciting read and an engaging romance. It is the first book in the Enchanted Immortals Trilogy and while the ending is a little open-ended, there are no earth shattering cliffys, so it could be read as a standalone. Overall, Aldin's Wish is a solid start to the series, introducing a world of God's, Vampires, and Shifters. 

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review 2017-08-06 16:50
Sweet Ruin (Immortals After Dark) - Kresley Cole

Oh my goodness, this one was so good. It was so hard to put it down. I loved the characters; Rune was such a strong male lead with such a dynamic personality and history, and Jo had so much spunk, attitude, and fire on the page. The plot was very strong and carried the reader through it all from beginning to end. The conflict wasn't some malevolent bad guy but rather how Rune's past colored his present and Jo's desire for companionship even in the face of a man who, on more than one occasion, told her he wouldn't be faithful. Her drive to protect her brother and then reunite with him also added a depth to her character that pulled the reader in. I loved how strong her personality was on the page and when the inevitable happened and she left Rune it was so heart wrenching. I really did worry that Rune wasn't going to see the error of his ways before it was way too late to salvage his relationship with his mate. There isn't anything I didn't like about this story. Loved it!

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