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review 2017-07-12 16:01
Book Review – Waiting for Walker, by Robin Reardon
Waiting for Walker - Robin Reardon

I read an amazing review of this book by Sammy Goode, and bought the book straight off. Ah, the power of word-of-mouth.

 

Loved, just loved this story, about people we so seldom see. With beautiful language and turns of phrase that hit me just so.

 

Beautiful.

 

”You came back to that rock and looked for me, out on the water. I think you want a new friend, too.”

 

Courage, when you realize you can no longer do nothing – but you still haven’t figured out what you can do.

 

We need more stories like this one, to lift us up, to see that it is possible to change, it is possible to take a road less traveled.

 

And that it is possible that other people’s truths are just as valid as your own. Only different.

 

Simply loved it. Warmly recommend it, especially as there was next to no sex in there, and sweet and slow, what was there.

 

Perfect.

 

 

*** Bought this book with my own monies after reading a smashing review.*** 

Source: annalund2011.booklikes.com/post/1578399/book-review-waiting-for-walker-by-robin-reardon
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review 2017-05-30 08:37
ARC Review – Elpída, by C. Kennedy
Elpida - C. Kennedy

Elpída. Hope.

Because without hope, we are all lost.

Because without hope, we have nothing.

 

The final installment of this trilogy leaves me shattered and sad, and full of anger towards the men who perpetrate this kind of abuse on children. But most of all, it leaves me with hope, exhilarated and happy, which, in this context, is nothing short of magic on the author’s part.

 

To take this extremely important and difficult subject matter, and lovingly show it without condescension or sensationalism, and give so many young people hope? Magic, indeed.

 

There is such powerful truth in this series. There is such compassionate giving of hope. It is horrid and beautiful at the same time, and it has a way of sending a spiraling sense of meaning out to young people who are hurting, telling them there is a future, there is a life, there is a way. Telling them that there are good people out there, who will love them.

 

Hope. Truly the most powerful of all human feelings.

 

We started with beauty in book one. And horror. And friendship. And love.

Omorphi. Beauty.

We continued with courage in book two. Lots and lots of courage. And love.

Thárros. Courage.

We finish with hope in this third book, as we run, and hide, and make mistakes, and fix them again. And love.

Elpída. Hope.

 

Thimi is a young boy who lived through the same horrors as Christy in Greece, and Christy finally gets to see his old friend again as he arrives in the US as a scared little waif of a boy. Thimi slowly opens up through the story, and as he starts to understand the sunshine that can exist in a normal life we get to see more about what happens inside a child after abuse.

 

When you read a YA book, not often does it also work as a manual of how to do things to help a former victim of abuse. It is not often that, in soft tones and sweet turns of phrase, you will understand and learn how to act around people who have been through the unthinkable. Who have been through the unspeakable.

 

This is a little bit like a beautifully crafted Technical Manual of Care and Maintenance for those who work with our collective youth, especially if they work with children or young adults who have had a hard time.

 

And the end result? The telling of a great, great love story — with true friendship shining through, the kind of love that inspires both happy endings and good laughs.

 

There are other new fascinating characters entering the scene, too, and especially Zero is someone I would love to see more of in a future book... I can truly say that I hope this trilogy gets a fourth and fifth instalment, because there are still things I’d like to know, (and history is full of excellent trilogies in five parts). (Just sayin’).

 

Beauty and Courage and Hope.

Because Elpida means hope.

And, as we said in the beginning, without hope, we are all lost.

 

***

 

I was given a free copy of this book from the publisher, Harmony Ink Press.

A positive review wasn’t promised in return. I also beta-read an early version of the manuscript.

 

Source: annalund2011.booklikes.com/post/1567067/arc-review-elpida-by-c-kennedy
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text 2017-05-10 02:22
Bout of Books 19 - May 8th Update
The Sinister Sweetness of Splendid Academy - Nikki Loftin

 

 

 

 The challenge for today was 

 

Share a book cover where illustrations are part of the typography of the title

 

I chose The Sinister Sweetness of Splendid Academy by Nikki Loftin.

 

 

 

 

 

My stats as of today:

 

# of Books Read: 0

 

# of Pages Read: 340

 

Currently Reading:

The Doom Machine by Mark Teague

The Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood

 

If you are interested in participating, you can still sign up today!

 

Bout of Books

 

Bout of Books
The Bout of Books read-a-thon is organized by Amanda Shofner and Kelly @ Reading the Paranormal. It is a week long read-a-thon that begins 12:01am Monday, May 8th and runs through Sunday, May 14th in whatever time zone you are in. Bout of Books is low-pressure. There are challenges, giveaways, and a grand prize, but all of these are completely optional. For all Bout of Books 19 information and updates, be sure to visit the Bout of Books blog. - From the Bout of Books team

 

 

 

 

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review 2017-04-22 09:55
"The Sweetness At The Bottom Of The Pie" by Alan Bradley
The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie - Alan Bradley

I came across "The Sweetness At The Bottom Of The Pie" when I was looking for new Canadian authors to read.  Alan Bradley gets great press, so I bought this book even though I was concerned that I might be getting an extended one line joke in which an aristocratic, 1950's  stiff-upper-lip Brit attitude was made amusing by being exhibited by an eleven your old girl.

 

What I got was something much more complex and engaging than that. I got Flavia de Luce, a young girl with a remarkable mind and dauntless heart, who is determined to solve a murder her father has been arrested for committing.

 

The book is set in England in 1950. shortly after the end of the war. Eleven year old Flavia lives in a large and once grand Stately Home with her two older sisters who are close to each other but exclude her, her emotionally withdrawn father and no memory of Harriet, her adventurer mother who is missing, presumed dead.

 

The book is tolde entirely in the first person from Flavia's point of view, su its success depends upon enjoying seeing through her eyes. Alan Bradley pulls this off perfectly- Flavia speaks and thinks in the over elaborate language of an intelligent, self-educated unsocialised child, intoxicated by the complexity of the world and unblinkingly confident in her ability to master it. Here is her description of her discovery, some years earlier, of the love of her life: Chemistry

The book’s title was An Elementary Study of Chemistry, and within moments it had taught me that the word iodine comes from a word meaning “violet,” and that the name bromine was derived from a Greek word meaning “a stench.” These were the sorts of things I needed to know!"

Flavia is proud of her rational mind and of having the objective curiosity of a scientist but also gives full reign to her imagination. This is her description of stepping into the grounds at night.

"As I stepped outside, I saw that the silver light of dawn had transformed the garden into a magic glade, its shadows darkened by the thin band of day beyond the walls. Sparkling dew lay upon everything, and I should not have been at all surprised if a unicorn had stepped from behind a rosebush and tried to put its head in my lap."

Flavia, recognises that her fascination with death and poisons might be considered pathological but she also knows that it is a true part of herself. When she comes across dying man in her garden and holds his head as he breathes his last, she is honest about her reaction:

"I wish I could say I was afraid, but I wasn’t. Quite the contrary. This was by far the most interesting thing that had ever happened to me in my entire life."

"The Sweetness At The Bottom Of The Pie" is a splendid detective story. Its characters and plot put Agatha Christie to shame. It evokes uppor-class England in the first half of the last century deftly and simply. It unfolds the plot at just the right pace. Yet, by far the biggest achievement of the book is the gentle disclosure of the mystery of Flavia de Luce herself.

 

Flavia lives in an emotional desert that could crush a lesser girl. She feels that she is not loved. Her solution is to decide that she must love herself. At one point, riding her mother's bike, that Flavia restored and rechristened as Gladys, at great speed, she gives way to joy, thinking:

"I was me. I was Flavia. And I loved myself, even if no one else did. “All hail Flavia! Flavia forever!” I shouted, as Gladys and I sped through the Mulford Gates, at top speed, into the avenue of chestnuts that lined the drive at Buckshaw."

I didn't want this book to end because I didn't want to leave Flavia. Fortunately, there are another four books in the series. I will be visiting her again soon.

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review 2016-10-28 09:39
ARC Review – Must Like Spinach, by Con Riley
Must Like Spinach - Con Riley

Fast track. Slick business boys, cutting costs for huge corporations, walking over dead bodies.

All things I positively hate.

 

And here goes Con Riley and makes me love this boy, Jonathan. How he finds peace in a garden in Seattle. How he connects with an elderly lady (how unusual to find real characters in an m/m story), and how he connects with the young man across the yard, despite at first judging him harshly.

 

Not everything is as it seems, and a garden in which to grow spinach is just one of the many layers of story within this story.

 

When your career makes you have to choose between being a good man and continuing in your job, you need to sit down and have yourself a good long think. And somehow this is not about Jon, no, it’s about the corporation he’s currently evaluating.

 

As usual with Con Riley, this is not a steamy story. It is slow burn. I love this. This is introspective, delving deep into what makes a man a man, and why we sometimes lose sight of who we are.

 

Isn’t it just great that sometimes a good story can set us straight again?

 

This is one of those stories.

 

I absolutely loved it, and hope you will all read it, too. Slow and easy.

 

5 stars

 

***

 

I was given a review copy of this book, and a positive review wasn’t promised in return.

Source: annalund2011.booklikes.com/post/1489301/arc-review-must-like-spinach-by-con-riley
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