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review 2019-02-09 23:24
Review ~ Meh again
Takedown Twenty - Janet Evanovich

3.5

 

Book source ~ Library

 

Stephanie Plum is a half-assed bounty hunter with the hots for two guys and has a best friend who is crazy. She has the paperwork needed to catch Salvatore Sunucchi for skipping out on his court date, but the problem is everyone loves Uncle Sunny and no one wants to tell her where he’s hanging his hat these days. Oh, everyone knows he’s a mob boss and he murdered someone, but hey, he’s so charming he doesn’t deserve to go to prison. While Stephanie tries to run down Sunny and avoid Sunny’s henchmen she’s helping hot security guy Ranger to solve the murders of several old ladies who were strangled and left in dumpsters. Hot cop guy Morelli says it’s not his case, but he’s helping out some, too. Because why not?

 

Even though I read book 25 just a few weeks ago, I hadn’t realized I’d somehow skipped this one. I mean, it’s understandable. They all run together like onelongassbook. This one is actually a bit better than the others, but not by much. Only because Ranger is in it a lot and Stephanie screws up even more than usual and actually gets hurt. Does it knock some sense into her? Not really. But I like how it twists a bit more than usual. In any case, this book is marshmallow fluff. It’s no good for you, but it’s pretty tasty in small doses. Light entertainment is all you get out of this one. As usual.

 

Source: imavoraciousreader.blogspot.com/2019/02/takedown-twenty.html
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text 2019-02-02 00:37
Four and A Half Stars but still DNF
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind - Derek Perkins,Yuval Noah Harari,Random House Audiobooks

 

The book is very good, thought-provoking, but sadly he gets preachy in places. I'm moving on. There is so much else that I want to read.

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review 2019-01-26 22:23
"Random - Narey and Winter #1" by Craig Robertson - highly recommended
Random - Craig Robertson

"Random" is the story of a serial killer like none I've read before. This is not some Hannibal Lecter evil-genius anti-hero, nor the all too common I-like-to-cause-women-pain serial killer, or even the Dexter "dark passenger" kind of killer.

 

This is a story of a disciplined man, following a plan with minimal emotional involvement. A plan that will get him an outcome that he greatly desires.

 

At least, that's how it starts.

 

Executing the plan costs our killer. It eats away at his humanity. It stresses him to the point where he struggles to keep control and starts to give way to paranoia and anger.

The whole story is told from the killer's point of view and we get to watch him fall apart.

 

"Random" delivers many of the things that attract people to serial killer books: tension and suspense, ingeniously managed kills, a strong sense of place, a high level of plausibility and a level of graphic violence that is convincing enough to be disturbing but never crosses the line into voyeuristic murder porn.

 

Yet the most interesting thing about the book is not who gets killed and how but the why of it all. The motivation behind the plan. The end game that you won't see coming. This is all brilliantly done through interior dialogue and memories. Memories are important in this novel. Our killer says:

 

"Memories are like landmines. You never know which one will blow up in your face".

Our killer is a fully developed character. Someone I could feel pity for. Someone who has lost himself. Someone doing things that he knows are unforgivable but which he makes himself do anyway.

 

Being inside this man's head is not a pleasant experience but it's not a trip to loony town either. It's unpleasant because any of us might find ourselves where he is.

The plot is clever and the pacing works. It's an astonishing debut by an author I want more of.

 

I picked up "Random" as part of my Thirty Firsts 2019 TBR Reading Challenge.The book is marketed as "Narey and Winter #1" so I expected it to be the first in a series of police detective stories, set in Glasgow, about two police detectives.

 

In reality, I spent all my time in the killer's head. Narey features throughout the book as a kind of remote threat of justice. Winter didn't make an appearance. I have no idea where book two will go.

 

It sounds to me like "Random" was a successful one-off novel that begged for an encore. Craig Roberstons writing is good enough to convince me to give the next book a try and find out where it goes.

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review 2019-01-22 00:00
Random
Random - Craig Robertson "Random" is the story of a serial killer like none I've read before. This is not some Hannibal Lecter evil-genius anti-hero, nor the all too common I-like-to-cause-women-pain serial killer, or even the Dexter "dark passenger" kind of killer.

This is a story of a disciplined man, following a plan with minimal emotional involvement. A plan that will get him an outcome that he greatly desires.

At least, that's how it starts.

Executing the plan costs our killer. It eats away at his humanity. It stresses him to the point where he struggles to keep control and starts to give way to paranoia and anger.
The whole story is told from the killer's point of view and we get to watch him fall apart.

"Random" delivers many of the things that attract people to serial killer books: tension and suspense, ingeniously managed kills, a strong sense of place, a high level of plausibility and a level of graphic violence that is convincing enough to be disturbing but never crosses the line into voyeuristic murder porn.

Yet the most interesting thing about the book is not who gets killed and how but the why of it all. The motivation behind the plan. The end game that you won't see coming. This is all brilliantly done through interior dialogue and memories. Memories are important in this novel. Our killer says:

"Memories are like landmines. You never know which one will blow up in your face".
Our killer is a fully developed character. Someone I could feel pity for. Someone who has lost himself. Someone doing things that he knows are unforgivable but which he makes himself do anyway.

Being inside this man's head is not a pleasant experience but it's not a trip to loony town either. It's unpleasant because any of us might find ourselves where he is.
The plot is clever and the pacing works. It's an astonishing debut by an author I want more of.

I picked up "Random" as part of my Thirty Firsts 2019 TBR Reading Challenge.The book is marketed as "Narey and Winter #1" so I expected it to be the first in a series of police detective stories, set in Glasgow, about two police detectives.

In reality, I spent all my time in the killer's head. Narey features throughout the book as a kind of remote threat of justice. Winter didn't make an appearance. I have no idea where book two will go.

It sounds to me like "Random" was a successful one-off novel that begged for an encore. Craig Roberstons writing is good enough to convince me to give the next book a try and find out where it goes.
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text 2019-01-21 11:07
Reading progress update: I've read 34%. - now there's clever for you...
Random - Craig Robertson

...just as I reached the point where I was thinking, "this will get tedious if we just keep repeating this pattern" the story twists, motivations deepen, threat cranks up and I'm STILL seeing everything from the point of view of one very unusual serial killer.

 

Great stuff... but how does this become that start of a series about two Glasgow Murder Squad Detectives?

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