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Search tags: young-voracious-reader
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review 2017-10-10 03:03
Part good, part meh
The Halloween Tree - Ray Bradbury

A fantasy romp through a narrow selection of death-cellebrating traditions. 12ish feels like the target audience aim.

 

I saw somewhere being said this is to Halloween what a Christmass Charol is to Yule. Well...

 

While I really liked some passages here and there (specially all those Oh, so grim rhymes), it was altogether too hazy and weird for me. I can enjoy weird, but this time I just kept loosing the thread in the story. Charol is still better.

 

 

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review 2017-10-02 15:08
Little mystery, big revelations
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time - Mark Haddon

This reminded me a lot of ROOM. Lacking the chroniclers limitations, we can read between the lines, anticipate and fear much that escapes them. It's likely that people that enjoyed/hated that one will feel similarly about this one.

 

I lack knowledge or real life contact to make a judgment on the verisimilitude of this one, but it was an interesting peak, hopeful and also painful.

 

The interspersed chapters on maths and science I found surprisingly easy to understand and entertaining, though I doubt it would be the majority vote.

 

Two bit comments:

 

- The teacher deserves an award.

- I thought I felt overwhelmed the first times I walked around Buenos Aires at sundown. Then again, the kid managed to get where he was going eventually, by public transportation even, when I know several adults that threw the towel and ran for a cab.

(spoiler show)

 

This could work well for Amateur Sleuth, Diverse Voices, I guess Chilling Children? I picked it up thinking it set in London. At least we do get there.

 

 

 

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review 2017-09-27 03:48
One more ride
Something Wicked This Way Comes - Ray Bradbury

The carnival comes to town, and it's a strange one. Not just because it's late in the year, or sets up at nigh. Like all carnivals, it promises magic, and magic there is. The kind that grants that most typical wish. Like most things one could want, one should beware of getting it.

 

In a fit of magical coincidence, this one could very well be the spiritual successor of Summer Wine: Greenville, autumn, and after the immortality of childhood, and the awakening self-awareness of twelve, the rush and hunger to grow of early adolescence.

 

A highly atmospheric, imaginative, spooky tale of friendship, coming of age, connecting, and loving the time you have now. At times it got too long-winded for my taste, it detracted from the action parts with detours, or confused me with metaphors, but for the most part I loved it, the emotions it pulled, the characters (the boys as much as the villains).

 

 

 

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review 2017-09-24 07:23
Ode to momentous summers
Dandelion Wine - Ray Bradbury

*pleased sigh* So gorgeous.

 

Dandelion Wine is a beautiful, whimsical love letter to those memories of summer that are so vivid, so powerful, we can feel the baking sun, the weight and smell of the air, the joy and lassitude when we recall them.

 

It goes from one episode to the next fluidly and with little warning, connecting and weaving them. Add in Bradbury's style and the result is a bit like dreams, a bit like memories, introspective, nostalgic and at points philosophical.

 

There were episodes to pull every shade of emotion, and I loved so many of them I'd have serious trouble picking a favorite. Grandma's cooking made me so hungry and also miss my grandfather very much. Colonel's Freeleigh's bits and John's departure made me tear a bit. I laughed out loud with the witch debacle. Lavinia's had me switch between cheering on and wanting to thump her, and scared me quite a bit. And the lime-vanilla ice-cream one! So many tangled feels!

 

It was an excellent read to savor, and one I'll revisit.

 

 

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review 2017-09-15 05:19
Wholeness, duality, I and Thou
The Left Hand of Darkness - Ursula K. Le Guin

I did not want this to end. I feel a bit bereft, and very emotional, and somewhat fragile (even if Rokkanon's World had prepared me for the possibility). And in awe. Dazzled in awe of how Le Guin can weave this beautiful settings to address concepts, limitations, canons of society, give them new perspectives and lead into discussions well before their time.

 

She did warn in a way, in that introduction. Because, it might be that I had late access to the Internet, and so was somewhat cut out from the world-dialogue, but it looks to me that talk of gradients and varieties of sex and sexuality (beyond the ever polemical homosexual, bisexual or trans-gender, and those as isolated phenomenons at that), is pretty recent. Yet here it is, served as a "fait acompli" in the form of a world where gender has always been a fluid thing, when it's even a thing, and the protagonist just has to deal, get over and past it, once and for all. Let me tell you, I had some fun mocking the MC over his inability to accept, because at some point, it annoyed me. Which is exactly the point of the book, I think.

 

Tied to that, all the issues of friendship, love, miss/understanding, acceptance, and what have you, in an epic sprinkled with back-ground myths and wrapped up in a sci-fi package. And by all the literary muses, I loved it.

 

 

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