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Search tags: 16th-century
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text 2017-08-07 21:53
Plantagenet Embers Kindle Box Set

Remember helping me with this cover? Well, it's finally here! This project, which I thought would be simple since it involved books I had already written, turned out to be almost too much for my level of tech savvy. Still, it is here in time to be taken to the beach this summer! Thanks to everyone who helped make it happen!

 

Source: myBook.to/PlantagenetEmbers
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review 2017-08-06 20:06
The Legacy of Luther by Nichols, Sproul, etc.
The Legacy of Luther - Stephen J. Nichols,R.C. Sproul

With this year being the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, everyone should be reading something about Martin Luther, and this particular book is a good choice for either beginner or dyed-in-the-wool Lutheran. Everything from Luther's life, his teaching, his interactions with other reformers, and the legacy he left behind is addressed here.

 

This book is divided into three sections that are each addressed through a series of essays written by an impressive team of theologians. While it is interesting to read the writing of various scholars and appreciate the way their essays support one another, it also inevitably creates some repetitiveness. My favorite section was the first: Luther's Life, which is a brief biography of Luther including how his beliefs were formed and evolved throughout his life.

 

The writers do not attempt to turn Luther into something he was not, and his faults are part of who he was. God used this temperamental and at times judgmental man. 'Because of the magnitude of the disorders, God gave this age a violent physician.' Luther was not passive and conciliatory, but he was who was needed to put the Reformation in motion.

 

The second section of the book covers Luther's Thought. This is a highly spiritual discussion of the tenets of faith that may be less familiar to those who are approaching this as a scholarly rather than a devotional work. Scripture Alone does not sound like a controversial stance to take now, but Luther shook the world with it. Each chapter covers the main issues that were written about by Luther and how they impacted the 16th century.

 

Finally, Luther's Legacy, the third section of the book, looks at the various roles Luther filled and what his impact was long after his death. It is here where we learn that Luther not only translated the Bible into German, but he helped form the German language into its modern form when he did so. He not only wrote hymns that involved his congregation in spiritual music, he was inspiration for future musicians such as Bach.

 

To this day, Wittenberg and the entire country of Germany celebrate Luther for the sacrificial work he performed that continues to have an important effect on us all centuries later. If you have ever wondered what all the fuss is about, this book is a good place to start.

 

I received this book through NetGalley. Opinions are my own.

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text 2017-08-03 15:59
The Evidence Against Elizabeth

This article was inspired by interactions on FB that often include other people praising Queen Elizabeth I while whitewashing anything horrible that she did and making a villain of her sister, Mary. I have encountered more than one person who believes Elizabeth completely innocent of any wrong-doing. I disagree.

Source: englishhistoryauthors.blogspot.co.uk/2017/08/the-evidence-against-elizabeth.html
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text 2017-07-25 15:56
Was Queen Mary advised by a heretic?

You know I can't go too long without talking about Reginald Pole! Was he a heretic? Depends on who you ask.

 

Source: samanthawilcoxson.blogspot.com/2017/07/was-queen-mary-advised-by-heretic.html
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review 2017-07-20 13:58
Martyr by Rory Clements
Martyr - Rory Clements

First of all, let's just take a moment to appreciate that I finally finished a monthly read for More Historical Than Fiction. Yay, me! I know, I know. That's not really applause worthy, but I'm taking my successes where I can get them.  ;-)

 

This book was a quick, enjoyable read for me. As a fast-paced mystery with a likable protagonist and a skilled creation of the Tudor world, it captivated and held my attention. I liked the fact that even though Queen Elizabeth never appears in a scene, the reader is given a strong impression of her character and heavy hand on events.

 

"Those who caught her eye lived a life between heaven and hell depending on her moods, which were as changeable as the weather: one moment sunshine and balm, the next thunder and rage."

 

Digging a little bit deeper, this book has a few flaws. John Shakespeare makes a great first impression, but I began to wonder what it was that he really believed and stood for as the book carried on. He is willing to risk his life to do his job, but why? The religious battle that grips the country seems to matter little to him, and he has no problem arresting one Catholic and sleeping with another.

 

Yet it wasn't until the odd Mother Davis bit that I took this book out of 5-star contention. I'm not even sure what to say about that strange episode.

 

The conclusion of the book felt a bit rushed after all the suspense of getting there, but the appearance of Will Shakespeare was a fun way to wrap things up. This is a series that will go on my TBR.

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