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review 2017-07-28 03:30
A touch of reality with tales of horror
Garden of Fiends: Tales of Addiction Horror - Johann Thorsson,Max Booth III,Glen Krisch,Jessica McHugh,Kealan Patrick Burke,Mark Matthews,Jack Ketchum

Some of these stories were unexpected. Some were actually touching considering the subject matter. Some a little creepy. I enjoyed the imagination of the different writers, the way their stories unfolded. This is not for the faint at heart with some of the endings. There were times I wanted to finish the story but I could not sit in my car all day. If you like horror with a touch of reality, this is a good place to find it.

I received this audiobook as a gift, and this is my unsolicited review.

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review 2017-07-27 16:22
Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann
Killers of the Flower Moon - David Grann

This book pieces together a brutal piece of history and unravels an ugly murder mystery. It’s disturbing, depressing and, at least for me, not at all the fast moving read I was led to believe from some of the early reviews. Maybe it’s just me, but I had a difficult time sticking with it. There were so many people involved and random details tossed in that didn’t seem to move things along that to me it seemed a little too over-stuffed and hard to follow at times. Perhaps it should’ve been a little longer? I don’t know. I tried it first in its Kindle version which includes photos of the people involved and then I moved on to the audiobook when I found myself putting it down and not wanting to pick it back up again. The audiobook is read by three narrators and one of them, Will Patton, is one of my favorites so that definitely helped. Something about his voice just pulls you in and forces you to pay attention.

This is a story about those in power who systematically attempt to eradicate an entire tribe of Indians in order to nab their wealth. First they remove them from their homeland and stick them on an unwanted patch of land (which turns out to be worth a fortune later when oil is struck), then they take their buffalo away making them dependent on the government’s money and then after the tribe has accumulated millions because they were far savvier than anyone assumed, the murdering begins. It is a terrible, awful story and it makes me heartsick that there was no justice and that these people were treated as if they were stupid children – or worse. I wasn’t expecting hearts and rainbows but I was hoping someone, somewhere would pay for all of the atrocities committed but no, the greedy and the powerful get away with murder. It’s sickening.

Do I recommend it? Yes, I do. It’s an important book and appalling true story that needed to be documented. We all need to know about the evil that was done to the Osage Tribe and I am not sorry I read/listened to it but I can’t honestly say I would ever read it again. 

Previous reading notes:
I'm putting this one on hold for a bit. I've been really struggling to get through it and am instead going to continue to wait for my number to come up for the audio version via Overdrive and read it that way. It's dense with information and history and I feel I'll absorb it better that way. My brain is too tired to read this at night after a never ending day. 

UPDATE: My number has come up and this is read by Will freaking Patton! Yes, this was most definitely a good decision on my part.



Starting over with the audio today. I'm kind of glad I have both as I can read along with the Kindle and look at the pictures smattered about while listening to Will Patton's voice. I feel so spoiled ;)

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text 2017-07-26 03:16
Reading progress update: I've read 1%.
Out of Nowhere (Middle of Somewhere Book 2) - Roan Parrish

Starting my favorite audio AGAIN because...

 


Listen #3

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review 2017-07-26 02:16
Magicians
The Magicians (The Magicians, #1) - Mark Bramhall,Lev Grossman

 

 

I watched the show first.  My husband checked out the DVDs of season one from the library. I quickly got hooked, and when I noticed that the show was based on a book, I put in a request for the downloadable audiobook, from the library's e-collection.  It took a while for the audiobook to become available, and when it did, the library's summer reading program was in full swing.  Since the theme for week four (this week) is "award winner or classic," I hoped against hope that this book was award winner...  And it is!  ALA Alex Award (2010) and John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer (2011).

 

While in the show, Brakebills is a graduate school for magicians, in the books, it is an undergraduate program.  I initially had a moment of "Aw, boo."  But then it occurred to me that this helps explain why, on the show, I thought Brakebills didn't "feel" like grad school.  I am guessing that the change was because certain mature situations from the book might seem less objectionable for 22-year-olds than 18-year-olds.

 

So, The Magician focuses its third-person limited narration on protagonist Quentin  Coldwater.  It traces his acceptance into the Brakebills program, his completion--in four years--of its five-year program, and his first few post-Brakebills years.  I enjoyed this book, though it some ways, the pacing seemed odd.  In some respects, the narrative felt rushed--like years at Brakebills would race to their conclusion.  But then certain conversations and actions would seem dragged out, bogged down with more detail than needed.

 

One of the primary differences between the show and the books is that the first season mapped to one year of school.  Presumably, each season will be devoted to a year of school (though if they want to go more than three seasons, they'll need a post-school era, since the grad program on the show is three years).  One of the things I appreciated about the book is that all of Quentin's friends from Brakebills have read and loved the "Fillory and Beyond" books (a series that, in the book's universe, has the popularity of the "Harry Potter" franchise).  On the show, the other characters treat Quentin as if liking the books makes him a bit of a dork.  Otherwise, although the way the stories are unspooled differs, the show and book hit many of the same major plot points.  But I will say the differences are significant enough that viewers of the show and readers of the books can still enjoy the other medium.

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review 2017-07-25 18:48
I Thought it Would Never End
Strange the Dreamer - Laini Taylor

3 stars (rounded up)-story
audiobook
Narration-excellent
The story was fascinating, beautifully written, visual, flowing as I have come to love of
Ms. Taylor's style and it was too long and over written. I wanted to love it, wanted to have that can't wait for more feel, instead I was asking, "when will this end". It was slow for me, dragging at times with inner dialog, extreme detailing of everything, that my mind would drift away to mundane thoughts instead of being in the story. Till the last hour of the book, that woke me up and grabbed my attention fully and then CLIFFHANGER ! I listened to over 18 hours struggled to stay with the story to finally have something happen and was left hanging with "to be continued" ARGUH ! Seriously ? That really pissed me off. For me the book was twice as long as it needed to be. There was a part where she went into such extreme details about kissing, omg how many pages did that carry on for in print ? The first 3/4 of the book was so slow and over written for this reader.
Will I read the next book ? Right now I have no interest. I'm so tired of the story, the endless self discoveries, and awakening feeling I really don't care. I am shocked I feel this way I adored her last series.

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