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review 2018-07-18 17:19
Review: The Rending and the Nest by Kaethe Schwehn
The Rending and the Nest - Kaethe Schwehn

When ninety-five percent of the world’s population disappears for no apparent reason, Mira does what she can to create some semblance of a life: She cobbles together a haphazard community named Zion, scavenges the Piles for supplies they might need, and avoids loving anyone she can’t afford to lose. Four years after the Rending, Mira has everything under control. Almost.

Then Mira’s best friend, Lana, announces her pregnancy, the first in this strange world and a new source of hope for Mira. But Lana gives birth to an inanimate object—and soon other women of Zion do, too—and the thin veil of normalcy Mira has thrown over her new world begins to fray. As the community wrestles with the presence of these Babies, a confident outsider named Michael appears, proselytizing about the world outside Zion. He lures Lana away and when she doesn’t return, Mira has to decide how much she’s willing to let go in order to save her friend, her community, and her own fraught pregnancy.

 

 

 

 

*I received a free copy from the publisher and chose to leave a voluntary review. Thank you!*

 

 

1 ½ ★

 

 

Sadly this book was a DNF, I don’t like to DNF books and I rarely do it but I just couldn’t connect with this book.

I like to say that the writing is what put me off, and that I’m sure many people will enjoy this book and its writing style. It just was not for me.

For one it seemed a bit too much philosophy for me. Yes, I like when I book makes you think and maybe see a bigger pictures but as far as I read this book was too much of it, almost was like fill in the blanks feeling for me. It started out with the world building or the lack of it, in this case. We are just thrown into the story with very little info about the world or prior events. We don’t know why 95% of humanity disappeared or what lead up to it. It’s just a fact no explanation or anything and we just supposed to take it. While sometimes that can make a book, it defiantly didn’t in this case, at least not for me. It just made me feel lost and disconnected to the book. That also goes for the characters. I had a hard time to connect to any of them and it just felt sort flat to me.

Another issue I had was that it seemed incredible slow to me , I only made it to page 116 but it felt like I read 300 some pages. But to be honest it could have been just the fact that I was not a huge fan of the book.

While this book was not for me, I still think plenty if people would enjoy it and appreciate the writing style much more than I did.

I rate it 1 ½ ★ for the 116 pages that I have read if the book.

 

 

Image result for nah gif

 

 

 

 

Buy Links

 

 

Amazon *** B&N *** Kobo 

Source: snoopydoosbookreviews.com/index.php/2018/07/18/review-the-rending-and-the-nest-by-kaethe-schwehn
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review 2018-06-23 18:01
Review: The Night Ferry (Konrad Simonsen #5) by Lotte & Soren Hammer
The Night Ferry - Lotte Hammer

 

Sixteen children and four adults are killed in a devastating boat crash in Copenhagen. Detective Chief Superintendent Konrad Simonsen is called in, only to discover that this was no accident and that one of the passengers has a very personal connection to the homicide team.

Reeling from this revelation and not knowing who to trust, Simonsen follows a trail that eventually leads him to Bosnia and a network of criminal misconduct. All evidence points towards one shady figure: a high-ranking army specialist with a suspicious past. But the more Simonsen digs, the further the truth slips from his grasp.

 

 

*I received a free copy from the publisher and chose to leave a voluntary review. Thank you!*

 

When I was offered this book for review I thought it sounded interesting. And I’m happy to report that it was and even more so then I thought.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book and everything about it. I enjoyed the setting, Denmark, which was a nice change of pace and I enjoyed it to learn more about it, I only been there once. I loved the characters, the bad, the good and the ugly , we get a nice mix of them and of course I really enjoyed the story which kept me glued to the page and kept me up late to finish it. I couldn’t put it down and just had to know who, where and what ;)

The pacing of the book was great most of the times there were only a few times it felt a bit too slow or maybe I was just impatient. I also should mention that while I really enjoyed the setting it also took me a couple chapters to get used to it and learn about their laws as I went a long. But it was a pretty smooth getting used to as the book just sucks you further and further into the plot.

This was my first book in this series but I think I will go and read some of the other books in the series I also will keep my eye out for future books be the authors.  If you a fan of murder mystery and thrillers I think you will enjoy this book.

I rate it 4 ★

Image result for ship in fog gif

 

 

 

Will be available July 3rd 2018

 

Amazon *** B&N  *** Kobo 

 

 

Source: snoopydoosbookreviews.com/index.php/2018/06/23/review-the-night-ferry-konrad-simonsen-5-by-lotte-soren-hammer
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review 2018-06-19 14:58
Charleston by Quentin Bell And Virginia Nicholson
Charleston: A Bloomsbury House and Garden - Quentin Bell,Virginia Nicholson,Alen MacWeeney

This beautiful book features the Charleston House and Gardens in Sussex. The house belonged to Vanessa Bell, the sister of Virginia Woolf . The book was written by Quentin Bell the nephew of Vanessa And Virginia Nicholson, Quentin's Daughter. 

 

The book is filled with pictures of each room, paintings, a blueprint of the house and garden. But the best art is reading Quentin's true life accounts of life in the house. He has stories about happenings in each room of the house. The house also features the Bloomsbury decorative style. 

 

The book was beautiful to flip through and very interesting to read. I would love to visit this house some day. The house is open to tours.

 

I received this book from the Author or Publisher via Netgalley.com to read and review.

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text 2018-01-31 18:45
January 2018 Reading Recap
On Fire: The 7 Choices to Ignite a Radically Inspired Life - John O'Leary
Searcher of the Dead: A Bess Ellyott Mystery - Nancy Herriman
Murder in Bloomsbury: An Atlas Catesby Mystery - D. M. Quincy
How to Break Up with Your Phone: The 30-Day Plan to Take Back Your Life - Catherine Price
A Study in Death - Anna Lee Huber
A Death in Norfolk - Ashley Gardner
Dreaming of the Bones - Deborah Crombie
Where Serpents Sleep - C.S. Harris
Present Over Perfect: Leaving Behind Frantic for a Simpler, More Soulful Way of Living - Shauna Niequist,Brené Brown

I read 9 books this month. Yay!

 

My reading goal this year is low because I want to be able to read with little pressure.

 

This month my favorite read was On Fire: The Seven Choices to Ignite a Radically Inspired Life.  I loved this book and highly recommend it.

 

I also enjoyed How To Break up With your Phone.  Great suggestions.

 

My mystery reads were all entertaining. I plan to catch up on these series in the months to come.

 

I am happy that three of my reads were nonfiction/self-help. 

 

My short-term goals are to read more classics, dive into the British Crime Mystery series and catch up on series I loved but have not gotten around to finishing.

 

Happy Reading!

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review 2018-01-17 15:04
Murder in Bloomsbury
Murder in Bloomsbury: An Atlas Catesby Mystery - D. M. Quincy

Author: D.M. Quincy

Series: Atlas Catesby  #2

Rating:  A Solid 3.5 stars

 

I received this book free in exchange for an honest review. 

 

This was a solid follow up to Murder in Mayfair. 

 

In this installment, our main character and gentleman Atlas Catesby is called on to help solve the mystery of the death of a footman. The footman is the brother of Lilliana's maid, Lilliana being the woman and now "Lady Roslyn" that Atlas helped save in the first book. The brother died with a belly full of arsenic. The mystery takes some interesting twists and turns, with me suspecting everyone who crossed the page at one point. It was well done. The author's notes indicate that this particular mystery is based on a little-known court case at the time.  I thought this was great. At the end, it was interesting reading the comparisons between what actually happened and what she took liberties with. Truth is stranger than fiction. 

 

On the personal front, Catesby is struggling with his feelings for Lilliana. Due to his station, he does not think himself worthy of her. This dilemma plays out with the characters in the mystery as well - and the parallels played off each other nicely. The will they/won't they pull of their relationship was well done. There was an interesting subplot involving Catesby's best friend and Catesby's sister that carried over from the last book.  I'm curious as to where that storyline is going.  I guess we will see what happens as the series continues. 

 

Reading all the "rules" of English society made me grateful I was not around as I would never be able to keep them straight.

 

Overall a good mystery. Between the two books, a solid start to a historical mystery series. I'll be reading the next one. 

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