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review 2017-09-25 21:51
Review: This Book Is Full Of Spiders
This Book Is Full of Spiders: Seriously, Dude, Don't Touch It (Trade Paperback) - David Wong

I. Hate. This. Book.

 

Okay, not really, but the ending, which I won't spoil, was upsetting.

 

So let me tell you, this book was well and truly full of spiders.  Gross.  It made me shudder just reading about them!!!!  This sequel was all together creepier, and more serious than it's predecessor.  John Dies At The End, while creepy, and it had it's sad parts, was a lot lighter and more humorous.  Things in this book escalated quickly.  Stuff got serious within the first chapter or two.

 

It doesn't take away from the book at all.  This was equally good, and it was evident that things clearly had to get worse this time around.  John and Dave are thrown into save-the-world situations, again, only this time they get separated and have to work toward the same goals while apart.  It definitely made for some anxious moments and the reader routing for them to make their way back together.  

 

There was still humor, and John and Dave's shenanigans will probably always be epic.  I am very much looking forward to the next installment!

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review 2017-09-23 22:30
A Disney Treasure Trove About Lost Cartoons
Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for ... Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Disney Cartoons (Disney Editions Deluxe (Film)) - David A. Bossert

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Disney Cartoons presents a history of the origins of the Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio and the hit they had in 1927 with Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, whose history has, surprisingly, been 'lost' until now.

 

Basically, if it weren't for Oswald, Disney may not have evolved to become the powerhouse it is today - but that journey was anything but linear. It involved Oswald's initial rejection, his eventual acceptance, and how Disney lost the contract to their first major character; only regaining the twenty-six Walt Disney created Oswald cartoons (and returning Oswald to his proper place in Disney history) six decades later.

Oswald's happy-go-lucky demeanor and his clever ability to come out on top of any situation predated Mickey's evolution and reflected creator Walt Disney's approach to life itself.

So how did Walt's first major animated success result not only in losing the contract, but in Oswald's journey into animation obscurity for so many years? Disney fans will quickly come to realize this story isn't just about Oswald's evolutionary process, but about Walt Disney's own evolution as he furthered his animation efforts and created the foundations of what was to become his more famous Mickey Mouse character.

 

From legends and realities to common animation practices of the day and how cartoons are 'lost' over time, Oswald the Lucky Rabbit packs in visual embellishments, from animation frames to vintage photos, in its efforts to trace Oswald's history through copyright synopsis, surviving film documents, and episode reviews.

 

Packed with illustration as it is, readers almost don't need the rare vintage Oswald film in order to enjoy this recreation of historical record that offers such in-depth discussion about Oswald's adventures and evolution.

 

Recommended for Disney fans, prior Oswald enthusiasts, and animation history readers alike, Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Disney Cartoons fills in many blanks and offers specifics about animation processes, legalese, and the process of researching and recapturing lost cartoons, and is a 'must' for any collection strong in Disney characters and history.

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review 2017-09-19 00:24
And I'm still indulging myself...
Who We Are - Charlie David,T.J. Klune

'Who We Are' is the second book in T.J. Klune's 'Bear, Otter and the Kid' series and this one found me enjoying the narrations of Charlie David and while I did enjoy this book, I have to admit for I enjoyed Sean Crisden's narration in the first book just a teensy, tiny bit more but this is probably as much a subjective opinion as it is anything else. 

 

I Ioved this series when I read it the first time and listening to it again on audio has only reaffirmed that opinion so I'm off to enjoy the third and final book available on audio as I anticipate the release of 'The Long and Winding Road' on audio...one day...soon...hopefully!

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review 2017-09-16 16:42
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by David Whitehouse
Journey to the Centre of the Earth: The Remarkable Voyage of Scientific Discovery into the Heart of Our World - David Whitehouse

TITLE:  Journey to the Centre of the Earth:  A Scientific Exploration into the Heart of Our Planet.

 

AUTHOR:  David Whitehouse

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  2015

 

FORMAT:  Paperback

 

ISBN-13:  978-1-7802-2870-9

 

_________________

In Journey to the Centre of the Earth, Whitehouse takes us on a tour of discovery through the Earth's crust, mantle, out core and inner core.  The author makes use of Jules Verne's "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" as a literary device as he takes the reader on a trip through the Earth, describing the scientists and the discoveries that lead to our knowledge of the Earth's geological structure.  He discusses such topics as earth quakes and seismology, the Earth's protective magnetic field, the interconnected relationship between biology, rocks and the geological workings of the Earth and other planets in this solar system.  

 

While the information provided in this book is interesting, some of it could have done with more detail.  The chapters are rather short, which is preferable to having separate topics all squashed into one chapter, however, topic organization was a little erratic on occasion.  This book includes many photographs and some diagrams but could have made use with a few more illustrative diagrams (and an editor).  The writing style is easy to read and accessible to the general public.

 

 

 

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review 2017-09-16 13:42
Non-Flash-in-the-Pan SF: “Counting Heads” by David Marusek
Counting Heads - David Marusek

“I am not pouting, and I am certainly not indulging in self-pity, as Eleanor accuses me. In fact, I am brooding. It is what artists do, we brood. To other, more active people, we appear selfish, obsessive, even narcissistic, which is why we prefer to brood in private.”

 

In “Counting Heads” by David Marusek

 

 

SF stories often regurgitate medieval themes and settings, including wars, sword fighting, emperors, dukes, and so on. Star Wars and Dune do this, too. They would have us believe that people still fight with (light) sabres although they master FTL travel as well. Light sabres may be entertaining, but to me they are not serious SF. I prefer another kind of SF, the kind that shows NEW forms of human/alien behaviour induced by alien settings and new technology, NEW dilemmas and choices, and shows how current developments will play out in the not-too-distant future. In short, it kind of sheds light on the human condition as I’ve been writing “ad nauseam” on this blog. David's Marusek brilliant "Counting Heads" has no sword fighting, no laser guns. It does have court cases being pursued by Artificial Intelligence Assistance up to the Highest Court within milliseconds. People being "seared" - deprived of their online identity and thereby being unable to live a normal life. Societies with large numbers of clones such as "Maries" (that often marry Freds, who are fond of making lists for everything they do).

 

 

If you're into SF, read on.

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