logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: David
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
text 2018-04-20 19:08
Please Bring Poetry To My Mom's Bookclub
Tiny Footcrunch - David Wasserman

I wrote this post for my Tiny Footcrunch publisher (Unsolicited Press!) to post during National Poetry Month:

 

 

My mother was so excited when I told her Unsolicited Press was publishing my book of poetry - excited and proud and just over the moon in that special motherly way. She immediately started listing everyone we needed to tell. 

“Your father! Mama and Papa! Cousin Laura down in Tennessee!”

“And hey, Mom, you could even read it with your book club!” I chimed in.

Awkward silence. “Mmm, maybe . . . hey, let’s FaceTime your brother!”

Even with the most exuberant and joyful of parents behind it poetry couldn’t quite sneak into The Book Club. Perhaps it’s due to post-traumatic stress from high school english class, a fear of not understanding the work or just an unease about change. Whatever the case, poetry is not a staple of most book clubs.

To be fair, there are some dedicated poetry book clubs (including some online - do a quick search and you’ll find some fantastic choices!) but they are the exception, not the rule. So then, why and howshould you add poetry into your book club?

The why is easy. It will break up the routine of novels, allowing your members to experience something different and unique. Poetry is usually a shorter read (time for reflection notwithstanding) and, in this fast-paced world where everyone has a million things to do, your members might just feel relieved to ditch those 400 pages of prose. Remember those “choose your own adventure” books? Each book club member can bring a different book of poems or single poem to the meeting, either their choice or guided around a certain theme. Putting poetry on the plate makes for a more complete dish.

How is a little trickier. The discussions you have (sprinkled in around the gossip and wine, I know) can be guided or more organic. I will use my upcoming book, Tiny Footcrunch, as a template for some possible exchanges:

  • -Which one line did you get stuck in your head?
  • -What does the key on the cover symbolize to you? Why the yellow background?
  • -Pair a poem with a food or drink, and tell why it works!
  • -Pick a poem: what TV show does it binge watch?
  • -Which poems are in the wrong sections of the book? Where would you put them?
  • -Did a certain poem resonate with you? Why?
  • -Which poem would you love, marry, kill?


You get the idea. The questions range from the standard tell your favorite poem and why to something more fun like what television show a certain poem might enjoy. All of these aim to break up the mundane and everyday - the monotony - a book club might develop.

So the next time it’s your turn to pick a book for book club, remember that a collection of poetry is out there waiting for you. 

Oh, and please recommend it to my mother’s book club.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-19 01:16
so, so mixed
Defenders Vol. 1: Diamonds Are Forever (Defenders (2017-)) - Brian Bendis,David Marquez

Is this MCU, or 616?   I still can't tell, but nonetheless I enjoy this.   Wondering what world it's set in confuses me and takes me out of the story, though, so not a five star read. 

Like Reblog Comment
text 2018-04-16 21:34
Reading progress update: I've read 120 out of 240 pages.
The Happy Pear - David Flynn,Stephen Flynn

People think that "going Vegan" is a major sea change.....Not true! I follow no Strict Diet, but appreciate Veganism for its Plant Based/Basis..we should all eat less Processed foods, and train our taste buds to "go basic" with Umami in the fore front...I love these brothers and their YouTube channel...check them out, please.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-16 03:59
If you like Lisbeth Salander, you will like this.
The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye - George Goulding,David Lagercrantz

The Girl Who Takes an Eye For an Eye, Paul Lagercrantz, author; Simon Vance, narrator

If you liked the Lisbeth Salander Millenium series, you will love this one. Although there are periods when the reader will definitely have to suspend disbelief, it is still an exciting page turner.

Lisbeth Salander is in trouble again. She is in prison for a crime most people think she should have been rewarded for, not punished, but she refused to help her own case in court and was found guilty. While in prison, her life was threatened so she was transferred to a maximum security prison known for its discipline, supposedly for her own safety. When she arrived there, she discovered that it was not as well controlled as its reputation and being safe there was an implausible option. Because of corrupt prison officials and threats made by a nefarious prisoner, the place had become the victim and plaything of this woman who called herself Benito. Well connected inside and outside the prison, she was running her own little organization within its walls. Lisbeth ignored her threats and took it upon herself to protect another prisoner from her brutality, making herself an enemy of Benito. This other prisoner’s name was Faria. She was the victim of Islamic extremism on the outside, and Benito was tormenting her on the inside. Her family believed she had dishonored them, and as a result, she was paying a high price for their behavior and her own. In Salander’s own inimitable fashion, she blackmailed the warden into helping her to stop Benito’s reign of terror, and in turn, it would also protect Faria. This, she convinced him, would help them both, as she forced him to also allow her access to his computer.

Then uncharacteristically, Salander engaged the help of Mikael Blomkvist. He was eager to come to her aid and when he discovered her guardian, literally on his deathbed, he became deeply involved in the circumstances surrounding his murder. His investigation led to the discovery of a long-term, unethical, clandestine experiment that had been conducted on twins, both identical and fraternal. They were separated and placed in foster homes or adopted out to homes that were opposite in all ways to see the effect the environment would have on the siblings. The cruelty of the scientific study was exposed and those behind it were ferreted out. Salander discovered that she had been part of it and sought to expose the group.

Although at times it was confusing as the time line jumped around and the themes went off on tangents, some which stretched the imagination a bit too far, it was an exciting read that will hold the attention of anyone who enjoys this series.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-13 19:14
Earth / David Brin
Earth - David Brin

TIME IS RUNNING OUT Decades from now, an artificial black hole has fallen into the Earth's core. As scientists frantically work to prevent the ultimate disaster, they discover that the entire planet could be destroyed within a year. But while they look for an answer, some claim that the only way to save Earth is to let its human inhabitants become extinct: to reset the evolutionary clock and start over.

 

My rating for this book probably suffers from my method of reading it—15 to 20 minute bursts while on coffee break at work. It’s a sci-fi thriller and reading only 20-30 pages per day really stretched out the action in a non-thrilling way.

It is also a little heavy on the hard science fiction side of things for my tastes—remember, I am primarily a fantasy reader! There’s an awful lot of mathematical calculations, envisioning the Earth’s core, and talk of gravity and fundamental particles. Not that there’s anything wrong with that, it’s just not my primary interest. Brin manages to bring in plenty of social and environmental issues too, and lots of people and politics, which was what kept me reading. Give me people issues!

One thing that I have to really credit this author for, he produces great swear words for his future characters. You realize that they are swearing, you accept it as such, yet the words aren’t any that would offend any contemporary reader.

It’s an interesting look at what the near future could look like and an action packed plot to keep you reading. I liked it, but I like his Uplift series more I confess.

Book number 279 in my Science Fiction and Fantasy reading project.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?