logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Fiction
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-09-22 02:01
Whispers Underground by Ben Aaronovitch (audiobook)
Whispers Under Ground - Ben Aaronovitch,Kobna Holdbrook-Smith

Series: Peter Grant #3

 

More fun with Peter Grant via the voice of Kobna Holdbrook-Smith.

 

Although the story kicks off with Peter and Leslie investigating the haunting of a rail tunnel at Abigail's behest, Peter quickly finds himself investigating the death of an American art student found stabbed in the back with a shard of magical pottery in the Underground. This leads us to meet Zack, another great character and the one who starts calling the policemen from the Folly the Isaacs (for Isaac Newton, naturally).

 

Peter also gets to showcase some of his police professionalism during interrogations and we get introduced to the Suspicious Behaviour Bingo Card, which I find a lot of fun.

 

I'm thinking about using this for one of my Halloween Bingo squares but I'm not sure which one. Although there is that segment with the haunted railway track, I'm not sure it plays a big enough role for "Haunted Houses". I may use it for "Supernatural" though, and it could of course also be used for "Murder Most Foul" and "Darkest London" (I'm still trying to save The Furthest Station for Darkest London).

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-09-22 01:47
Why shoot a Butler? by Georgette Heyer
Why Shoot a Butler? - Georgette Heyer

I was worried that I wouldn't like this book because of my disastrous encounter with Venetia, one of Heyer's regency romances, but this was pretty good. 

 

Mr. Frank Amberley, a barrister visiting his relatives in the country, comes across a man shot dead in a parked car with a woman standing alongside whilst trying to following his cousin's poor directions for a short cut. He reports the murder but doesn't mention the woman because he strongly believes she didn't do it and doesn't trust the local constabulary not to try to pin it on her by mistake, apparently. You could easily accuse him of arrogance, I suppose, but he does seem to be a clever man.

 

This kicks off an amateur investigation where Amberley liaises with the police without telling them everything. I didn't guess the solution to the mystery although I had an inkling about part of it. I enjoyed the dialogue the most, I think. There was a lot of clever talking or whatever you want to call it, where characters don't exactly say what they mean but you follow along anyway, or characters mock each other without the author having to come out and say it. Or maybe others wouldn't say it was like that at all but I had fun with it regardless.

 

The last summing up chapter could have been a teensy bit shorter, but overall it was fun.

 

I read this for the "Terrifying Women" square for the Halloween Bingo but it could work equally well for "Murder Most Foul" and "Amateur Sleuth". It may work for "Country House Mystery" as well, although the number of suspects isn't quite as limited as some country house settings although you are still limited by being in the country.

 

Previous update:

52%

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-09-22 00:06
Reading progress update: I've read 158 out of 357 pages.
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books - Martin Edwards

Up to the end of chapter 10 now, and we've moved into the territory also covered by Edward's short story anthologies: Serpents in Eden (countryside crimes), Murder at the Manor (country house crimes), Capital Crimes (London mysteries) and Resorting to Murder (detectives solving crimes while on vacation), and finally, Making Fun of Murder (books satirizing the genre -- so far, not also the topic of a short story anthology).

 

I'd been planning to create one single "other books mentioned" list for all five of these chapters, but it turns out Edwards really went overboard on this one ... so I ended up with an 80+ book list just for chapters 6 and 7 (the two countryside chapters):

 

http://booklikes.com/apps/reading-lists/829/martin-edwards-the-story-of-classic-crime-in-100-books-other-books-mentioned-part-2-ch-6-10

 

-- with further lists to be created for the next chapters separately.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-09-21 22:35
Go Down Together by Jeff Guinn, narrated by Jonathan Hogan
Go Down Together: The True, Untold Story of Bonnie and Clyde - Recorded Books LLC,Jeff Guinn,Jonathan Hogan

 

Turns out that a lot of things I thought I knew about Bonnie and Clyde were not true. They were not a tall and handsome couple like Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway. They were also not very smart-both of them spent some in jail and for Clyde that was some hard time. I guess that old adage is right: crime does not pay.

 

 

 

I started to list here all the things I learned from this book, but then I realized that would be spoiling things for everyone else. I decided I'm just going to stick to the main points:

 

As I said above, they were not smart criminals. They were repeatedly jailed, chased, shot at, etc... They were often injured in these gunfights with police and when I say injured, I mean badly hurt. They were great at stealing cars though, and Clyde liked the Ford V-8's so much he wrote Henry Ford a fan letter about them.

 

They loved their families and made arrangements to see them often: which just illustrates how clueless and unprepared the law was for fugitives like these. They didn't stake out the houses of Clyde or Bonnie's mothers or their other relatives, until near the very end. If only they had done that, many lives could have been saved.

 

Clyde and Bonnie loved lavishing their relatives with money and gifts, (when they could), and they both liked to dress nicely. That was about the only luxury they could enjoy, because they were almost always on the run, never able to relax or enjoy themselves. Most of their robberies netted them so little in the way of booty, they were hardly worth the trouble.

 

 

Lastly, they truly did love each other. When Bonnie's leg was badly injured, (due to a car chase and subsequent wreck where battery acid leaked all over her), Clyde forever after carried her wherever she needed to go. Bonnie's poetry and writing all showed that she knew they would both come to a bad end, but she loved him and wanted to be with him, even in death. So, I guess that one part of the Hollywood myth is true.

 

I listened to the audio version of this book. It was detailed, but not too much, and the narrator even added a little humor when the time was right. I learned a lot.

 

Recommended!

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-09-21 20:22
A Collegiate Casting-Out of Devilish Devices - Terry Pratchett 
A Collegiate Casting-Out of Devilish Devices - Terry Pratchett

Pratchett held a keen understanding of academia, as well as of politics, policing, law, assassination, and another myriad subjects that his background wouldn't suggest he was properly educated to address. Clearly the man Terry Pratchett was insufficiently educated to produce such brilliant witty novels. He was no doubt a front for some other writer who had an extensive advanced education in various specialties. It's the only reasonable explanation.

 

Hmmm. I wonder if I can get a grant to research the possibility?

 

Story available online.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?