Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Gods
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-18 16:27
Gods of Howl Mountain
Gods of Howl Mountain: A Novel - Taylor Brown

Growing up in the South, it was impossible not to hear the stories of secrets, bootlegging, faith healers, and the like. One look at the cover and blurb for this one and I was anxious to dive in, and dive in, I did - only to dive right back out several times. The idea for this one was certainly intriguing, and Brown does know how to paint a scene with vivid descriptions - of everything. While I do appreciate setting a scene and giving the reader a detailed picture in their mind, the gripping story I was hoping for got a bit lost in the details. The characters were rather one-dimensional and stereotypical, and while there were secrets to be discovered, without that connection to any of the characters, I was never able to immerse myself in the story. In the end, I had spent more time setting this one aside for later than reading it. Quite possibly, this just wasn't the book for me. I once heard someone say that no two people ever read the same book, and that is about as accurate as it gets, so if the description for this one appeals to you, by all means, give it a gander.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-16 18:38
BLOG TOUR, REVIEW & #GIVEAWAY - Tainted Rose (Starlight Gods #2) by Yumoyori Wilson
Tainted Rose (The Starlight Gods Series #2) - Yumoyori Wilson,Rachael Kunz
Tainted Rose is the second book in the Starlight Gods series, and I'm so excited for the third book already! I can't wait!!!
We start where Dark Wish ended - Mako/Midnight are recovering from the attack. However, we learn that her Knights survived the attack, and it was all part of a 'big plan'. The trouble is, Mako is in a coma, and shows no signs of waking up, which puts a HUGE strain on all the guys, with Ryder bearing the brunt of it all. Through faith, luck, and pixie dust - sorry, I meant FAIRY dust, Mako does wake up, but things are quite as normal as she, and the guys, wanted.
There is so much I could say about this story, but I really don't want to give away any spoilers. Once again, this is an amazing story that completely gripped from the first word to the last. Mako is just as quirky as she was in the first book, and she now has her ginger Knight too, which she is VERY happy about. I love how we see the different spirits to each of them, plus how the Knights all have their own very individual characters, and their own histories too. Poor Daniel, that's all I'll say on that one!
With no editing or grammatical errors to disrupt my reading flow, this story flowed very nicely indeed. Once again ending on a cliffhanger, I am left waiting and wanting for the third book in this series. Absolutely loving it, and definitely recommended by me.
* A copy of this book was provided to me with no requirements for a review. I voluntarily read this book, and the comments here are my honest opinion. *
Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!



Source: archaeolibrarianologist.blogspot.de/2018/03/blog-tour-review-giveaway-tainted-rose.html
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-11 20:01
Dragon Sword and Wind Child by Noriko Ogiwara, translated by Cathy Hirano, illustrations by Miho Satake
Dragon Sword and Wind Child - Miho Satake,Noriko Ogiwara,Cathy Hirano

Fifteen-year-old Saya is the only survivor of an attack by the army of the God of Light on her village when she was a child. Although she occasionally dreams about the attack, she now lives with her adoptive parents in the village of Hashiba, which has accepted the God of Light and his immortal children, Princess Teruhi and Prince Tsukishiro. Saya has no memories of her birth parents and loves the Light just as much as any other person in Hashiba, so it's a shock when several strangers arrive and tell her that she's a princess of the Children of the Dark. Unlike the immortal Children of the God of Light, the Children of the Goddess of Darkness can die and then be reincarnated, and Saya is the reincarnation of the Water Maiden. Before she has a chance to truly process this, Prince Tsukishiro arrives and takes a sudden interest in her.

Saya is faced with several choices: she can become one of the prince's handmaidens and eventually his bride, knowing that he doesn't really love her; she can kill herself like the Water Maidens before her; or she can somehow find a way to escape. She chooses the third option and discovers both the Dragon Sword, a weapon so powerful it can kill gods, and Chihaya, a Child of the God of Light who is seen as a failure by his siblings because he has always been drawn to the Darkness.

I honestly didn't know where Ogiwara was going to go with this book, most of the time. Saya figured out that her love for Prince Tsukishiro was foolish surprisingly quickly, although it took a bit longer for her heart to catch up. Chihaya was...unexpected. I had caught the mention of a third Child of the God of Light, but I hadn't thought that Saya would be meeting him so soon and taking him along with her.

The immortals, Chihaya in particular, came across as somewhat alien. Chihaya had the ability to switch bodies with various animals and didn't seem to be aware, or maybe didn't care, that the animals wouldn't necessarily be okay if they got injured while he was using them. He could experience pain and certainly disliked it, but any injuries would usually disappear in a day or less. He cared about his horse and Saya, in that order, and I'm not sure he truly realized, during a good chunk of the book, that Saya could die.

The book's pacing was a bit slow for my tastes, but I liked reading about Saya's efforts to understand Chihaya. She had to struggle to convince the Children of the Goddess of Darkness to keep him free as he kept doing things that indicated he was more dangerous to have around than they'd initially thought. Watching how Chihaya changed as the story progressed was fascinating.

I wish, though, that Saya hadn't come across as more a supporting character than a main character. I went into the book expecting her to be more active. There were moments when she had choices to make and things to do, but mostly she existed to support Chihaya while he gradually came into his powers and got a better look at the Darkness he'd been drawn towards all his life. Saya supposedly had the power to pacify gods but never got to the point of being able to use them, unless her ability to connect with Chihaya counted.

I kind of wish this had been a friendship-only book, since I felt Chihaya and Saya worked best as friends, but I suppose their eventual romance fit with the "God of Light and Goddess of Darkness" theme. The way I felt about the two of them reminded me a little of how I felt about the sudden romance in Philip Pullman's The Amber Spyglass. It felt forced.

All in all, despite its problems this was pretty good. I look forward to the next book, although I wonder how it'll be related to this one. I don't recognize the character names in the description and, honestly, the way Dragon Sword and Wind Child ended makes it work just fine as a standalone.


The book includes two full-page, full-color illustrations. One is a larger version of the cover illustration.


(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-10 20:00
So many things, all going on at once.
The Prey of Gods - Nicky Drayden

To give you an idea of how busy this plot was, the point of view characters were:

1. A teenager who gets superpowers via a new drug (also dealing with a complicated relationship with his boyfriend, and a bunch of family history issues).

2. A service robot on the verge of sentience (to robot uprising or not to robot uprising?)

3. An ancient demigod on the prowl for worshippers and power.

4. A city counsellor who is struggling with wildlife management, a potential major political run and gender identity issues (as well as a secret life as a lounge singer).

5. A child from the slum who turns out to be a demigod (and her family, and her father/mentor/god).

6. A pop superstar with super powers related to the teen, family secrets, and a show to put on.


If you guessed that all of these characters end up at the pop concert, you guessed correctly. If you guessed that six main characters, at least three intersecting sets of powers/tech/magic/gods/whatever going on at the same time is going to make the back third of the novel a tad busy, but you got that one right too.


I liked all of these complicated, difficult characters on their own, and a lot of the plot elements were original and interesting, but giving them each their due in the middle of an attempted apocalypse was a little more than a first-time novelist could quite pull off. By about fifty pages from the end, after pretty well everyone had died and resurrected multiple times, I just didn't have that much investment in how the big fight was going to work out.


(Also, without spoilers, there's a sub plot about motherhood, and another about a stalker that I found really off putting.)


Which is too bad, as there was a lot of potential there, and as mentioned I really dug most of the characters, who were flawed and allowed to screw up and redeem themselves (or not). The setting was great, and worked really well to inform the characters, and I liked the afro-futurist elements a lot. Looking forward to what Drayden does next.

Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-03-08 00:53
Taudry Statue Gets Woman Laid in Desire of the Gods
Desire of the Gods: Apollo - Marianna Green






The last thing Paula needed was a blindfolded, glowing god in her bed, but that's exactly what she got.


Still reeling from her fiance, Nick, breaking up with her, Paula is desperate to try anything to get him back. So when her neighbor, Mrs. Stephanopolos gives her a magic statue that will give Paula her heart's desire, she's skeptical but does the required ritual anyway.


A split second later, Apollo, the Greek god of the sun, is standing in her bedroom, ready to help Paula, even though he thinks Paula can do so much better than Nick. Everything seems to be working out until Eros sneaks in and shoots one of his insta-love arrows at Apollo. Now the sun god needs to stay permanently blindfolded to avoid falling in love with the first woman he sees, especially when Paula is so not his type. Now Paula and Apollo are stuck with each other until Aphrodite can swoop in and reverse the spell. But with the two of them in such close proximity to each other, they might realize they're each other's types after all. 



I definitely enjoyed this book. A lot of little details were explained, like the history of the statue and why she and Apollo can understand each other, despite them speaking different languages. And even though this book has a lot of my usual pet peeves, like insta-love, arrogance, and even lack of regard for personal boundaries, I still didn't mind it. I think it's easier to accept because Apollo is a god and things work differently for him. His love for Paula doesn't have to be completely realistic because he's not human. 


However, the actual moment Apollo gets shot is incredibly anti-climactic. 


Suddenly, the golden god flinched, and he slapped at the side of his neck as if stung by a mosquito.

“No - Oh No! Not again!” He shut his eyes tight.

“What’s the matter?” Paula stared at him.

“Eros,” groaned the god, keeping his eyes tight shut, “He’s fired on me.”


That's it. It's a significant event in the book but it's as dramatic as a mosquito bite. You don't even meet Eros in this book. But aside from that unsatisfying scene, this was an excellent story. 


I really liked Paula as a character. She's a bit of a smartass and despite being insecure with her looks, she's not whiny or obsessive about it. Even though she needs to go along with Apollo's absurdity to get her heart's desire, she stays snarky instead of being resigned to taking his (unintentionally) hurtful comments about her appearance. The only thing I didn't really like about her was her attachment to Nick. I get the fact that he was her fiance and she's in love with him, but it got a little repetitive, even in this novella-length story. It was especially bad when:


Nick saw her with Apollo, jumped to conclusions, and called her a slut for moving on so quickly, even though he left her for another woman. 

(spoiler show)


However, for the most part, Paula rocked. 



Apollo is so absurd, he's adorable. Normally, arrogance turns me off, but Apollo is so over the top, it's impossible to take him seriously. 


"Turn away from me, and try not to think of my wonderfully developed upper arms or what you moderns call my six pack"


It's just so silly that it's funny. And Apollo genuinely does care for Paula. He warned her away from Nick from the start, telling her she could do better. He also offered to strike Nick dead for her and was in general very protective of her (but not in a controlling way). 


His lack of personal boundaries bothers me slightly. He has no concept of personal space and has no problem touching Paula randomly and without warning.


When sleeping in her bed, he used her breasts for a pillow, and while sleeping he dry-humped her.

(spoiler show)


While this sort of behavior would usually bother me, I don't really mind it because it's pretty clear he's not doing it to exert power over her or because he thinks he owns her. He's just pretty oblivious to how the world works. 


The second book in this trilogy explains that the gods are all pretty immature and careless like this because they do not have the ability to change and grow like humans do.

(spoiler show)


However, I really liked him for the most part. He's really sweet in general and has a great dynamic with Paula. 



This was definitely a short and sweet read worth checking out. People who love romance and Greek mythology will like this book, and the other two novellas in the trilogy. It's available for free on Smashwords.


Source: www.smashwords.com/books/view/671237
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?