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review 2017-10-11 00:00
Killers of the Flower Moon
Killers of the Flower Moon - David Grann This has been the hot book of Tulsa this summer. Probably the most butchered title also. As a librarian, I have gotten really good at figuring out that our customers wanted this book when they ask for "Flower Killers," "Moon Flowers," or "Flower Killer Moon."

"Killers of the Flower Moon" is the story of Osage Indians being murdered for mineral rights or headrights in Oklahoma. However, the story is deeper and darker then that. It's about white man's greed, systematic injustice towards the Osage, and the lack of justice. It's also about the beginning of the FBI and how Hoover parlayed the agents' case into a national spotlight on the burgeoning FBI.

This was right in my wheelhouse as it was a great combination of true crime and history. Add to that description it happened not far from where I currently live and it definitely felt like history was close enough to touch.

Recommended if you enjoy true crime, history...I would recommend this to anyone. Toss it in their hand and say, "You must read this. We must do better than our history."
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review 2017-10-10 19:30
I Will Find You
I Will Find You: Solving Killer Cases from My Life Fighting Crime - Joe Kenda

[I received a copy of this book through NetGalley.]

I never watched the show, so I won’t be able to compare for now (I may watch some episodes later if I can find some episodes that aren’t available for US only or through shady websites); actually, I hadn’t even known about Joe Kenda before requesting this book. The book itself, when I read its blurb, looked interesting, and I was in the mood for crime-related non fiction, so here I am now.

Interesting it was, indeed. I learnt quite a few things about police procedures, all the more because I don’t live in the USA, and basically all I know is what I’ve seen in TV series (no worries, I was kind of already suspecting that TV =/= truth ;)). Not that it surprised me, but it’s always good to see that, well, one was right in wondering ‘do these things really happen like that?’

What also really happens like that is crime itself, and sadly, what Kenda described in the book didn’t surprise me either (I don’t have a very good opinion of man as a species). Again, I can’t compare with the series, and I don’t know if what he writes about here is something watchers already know, or grittier/less gritty than what has been aired. It did seem gruesome enough to me. I’m not easily disgusted to the point of physically having to stop reading, but I can envision this being a turnoff, at least at times, as a reminder that people can do horrible things, including to their kids, innocent bystanders, for the stupidest reasons, for something as trivial as 20 quid, etc.

I wasn’t entirely convinced by the tone/style. Not sure how Joe Kenda fares in the show, but here there were some turns of phrase, some vocabulary, that I felt was... not sure how to explain it, too demeaning or for shock value? I would probably have such words about criminals myself, so it’s nothing like ‘oh noes, swearing is bad’, and more like ‘the stronger the vocabulary/opinion, the lesser the impact’? Yes, I think that’s it: the grit and dark side can very well stand on their own, and they would have more impact if presented in a more ‘neutral’ tone. It may just be me, though.

(On the other hand, of course, you can tell that the author feels very strongly about this, and it's completely understandable!)

Apart from this, I definitely found this book interesting, both for the police work it presented, and for the other aspect of Kenda’s life (his family, how they too had to cope with his career, how the horrors he’s seen affected his whole home, etc.).

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review 2017-09-21 19:06
Good Me, Bad Me / Ali Land
Good Me Bad Me - Ali Land

Not recommended for those who have children and/or are sensitive to violence against children.

Milly knows she is different from other children. From other people. But she maybe doesn’t realize just how different. You see, Molly’s mother is a serial killer and she has forced Milly to be Satan’s little helper. It’s much easier to snatch a child if you have one of your own in tow.

What conscience Milly has left has sent her to the police. Yes, she felt bad for the children lying dead in their basement, but what she was truly dreading was the “birthday party” that her mother was planning when she turned “sweet sixteen.” So before the invitations go out to people to come & brutalize her, Milly turns her mother in.

But she had no idea how hard it was going to be to leave her mother behind. Or how difficult it will be to act like she is “normal,” especially when she has been taught by an expert how to read body language, how to manipulate people, how to tell them what they want to hear. She can’t seem to fit in to her foster situation, because she can see altogether too clearly what is going on in their home—and how can she trust a social worker who can’t see that his wife is an addict and his daughter is well on her way to the same state.

If you like this book, I would recommend I Hunt Killers by Barry Lyga. It is a young adult work, but really well done in my opinion. Another child struggling to right himself after being raised by a serial killer dad.

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review 2017-09-11 16:48
The Killer Inside Me / Jim Thompson
The Killer Inside Me - Jim Thompson

Everyone in the small town of Central City, Texas loves Lou Ford. A deputy sheriff, Lou's known to the small-time criminals, the real-estate entrepreneurs, and all of his coworkers--the low-lifes, the big-timers, and everyone in-between--as the nicest guy around. He may not be the brightest or the most interesting man in town, but nevertheless, he's the kind of officer you're happy to have keeping your streets safe. The sort of man you might even wish your daughter would end up with someday.

But behind the platitudes and glad-handing lurks a monster the likes of which few have seen. An urge that has already claimed multiple lives, and cost Lou his brother Mike, a self-sacrificing construction worker who fell to his death on the job in what was anything but an accident. A murder that Lou is determined to avenge--and if innocent people have to die in the process, well, that's perfectly all right with him.

 

Read to fill the “Serial/Spree Killer” square for 2107 Halloween Bingo.

 

This novel is considered a classic in the crime/noir genre and I think it certainly deserves its place there.  First published in 1952, it may be one of the earlier books that gives the reader a glimpse into the head of a serial killer.  Lou Ford, a deputy sheriff in small town Texas, thinks he can murder his way out of any problem.  He spends his time getting the towns folk to believe that he is just a good old boy who wouldn’t hurt a fly and probably isn’t all that bright—and committing sophisticated crimes which, as a member of law enforcement, he knows how to cover up.  In many ways, he is the predecessor of Dexter Morgan, the cheerful serial killer who works in Miami as a forensic blood spatter technician.  Maybe also to “true crime” books like In Cold Blood by Truman Capote.

 

The writing is impressive.  If you’re female, you’re going to flinch at Lou’s casual attitude to mistreating and killing women, but it’s all part of his persona.  Not to mention that it is true to life—art imitating reality.  Crime and criminals have been with us forever, but this book helped in the process that brought the awareness of them into current popular culture.

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review 2017-08-30 19:51
She Is On The Hunt – Huntress Moon by Alexandra Sokoloff @AlexSokoloff
Huntress Moon - Alexandra Sokoloff

Huntress Moon by Alexandra Sokoloff is a thriller of my favorite kind. I love serial killers, but Alexandra takes me to an even better place. We have a female serial killer.

 

The beautiful cover makes me feel a sense of danger and I can hardly wait to get on the road.

 

Cover:  Braun Haus Media, LLC  /  Photo:  Lilkar

 

 

Huntress Moon (The Huntress/FBI Thrillers, #1)

Amazon US  /  Amazon UK  /  Amazon CA  /  Goodreads

 

MY REVIEW

 

I am salivating at the thought of diving into Huntress Moon, a thriller with a female serial killer. I love to read about serial killers, but a female one is very rare. I am ready to be wowed.

 

FBI Special Agent Matthew Roarke’s spidey senses were tingling. Is it intuition, a cop’s experience honed to pick up subtle vibes, or something more?

 

He was meeting an undercover agent when he saw her. She stood out…reeked of danger…and as the pieces come together, he is hot on her trail.

 

Roarke could’ve run the division, but he preferred the autonomy of choosing his own cases, running his own investigations. His work is his life.

 

Life comes full circle for Roarke and I see why he is drawn to her. I am drawn to her.

 

She is damaged, in a way that makes me want ‘normal’ for her. But it can’t be. Is she a good killer? A bad killer? Is there such a thing as a good one? Does she save lives even as she takes them? I am ambivalent, seesawing back and forth…

 

My feelings are all over the place. I am not a black and white, good and bad type of person. I feel a lot of life is filled with gray areas. But, I do have lines that define right and wrong. My big problem is…I love the villain.

 

The creative approach that Alexandra Sokoloff took with the storyline had this playing out in my mind like a movie script. I was continually amazed at the killers boldness and ability to hide in plain sight. But…we know that can’t go on forever.

 

I worry for the father and the boy. How callous and cruel is she? How far will she go?

 

The feeling of doom hangs over me, I fear for their lives. After all, she is a serial killer and will do whatever is necessary to get away.

 

I love a great villain but what happens when the villain is the victim? Of course aren’t all criminals victims, or they wouldn’t be so damaged to begin with. Their past does not excuse their present. I can’t see how this will end in a way I want, because I’m rooting for her.

 

How long can she go on? When will Roarke catch her, because we know he has to…

I never guessed it. I love it and I hate it! I must have more.

 

AND…you will need the next book.

 

I voluntarily reviewed a free copy of Huntress Moon by Alexandra Sokoloff.

Animated Animals. Pictures, Images and Photos  4 Stars

 

Read more here.

 

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Source: www.fundinmental.com/she-is-on-the-hunt-huntress-moon-by-alexandra-sokoloff-alexsokoloff
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