logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Renaissance
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-10-06 17:33
Reading progress update: I've read 332 out of 332 pages.
Wyrd Sisters - Terry Pratchett

One of those Discworld books that only get better with every single reread.  Pratchett absolutely hit his stride with this ... one of my all-time favorites, by far not for the Shakespeare references alone.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-05-23 13:56
BLURB BLITZ, EXCERPT & #GIVEAWAY - The Renaissance Club by Rachel Dacus
The Renaissance Club - Rachel Dacus

Would you give up everything, even the time in which you live, to be with your soul mate? That’s the question my heroine, May Gold must answer in this time travel love story. And she has to answer it in three short weeks, on a tour of Italy. A college adjunct teacher, she often dreams about the subject of her master’s thesis—17th century sculptor Gianlorenzo Bernini. In her fantasies, she’s in his arms, the wildly adored partner of the man whose passionate art invented the Baroque style. But in reality, May has just landed in Rome with her teaching colleagues and older boyfriend. She considers herself a precocious failure and yearns to unleash her passion and creative spirit. May finds she has to choose: stay in a safe but stagnant existence or take a risk.

 

Source: archaeolibrarianologist.blogspot.de/2018/05/blurb-blitz-excerpt-giveaway.html
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-05-05 14:53
Boleyn Is Back

Are any of BL's other resident history lovers following this? (On FB and Twitter -- #BoleynIsBack)  I confess I'm having a blast ...

 

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

A few from yesterday:

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
url 2018-02-26 22:55
Podcast #92 is up!
The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke - Jeffrey C. Stewart

My ninety-second podcast is up on the New Books Network website! In it, I interview Jeffrey Stewart about his new biography of the early 20th century African American scholar and critic Alain Locke (which I reviewed here). Enjoy!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-02-20 01:07
A masterful study of the "dean" of the Harlem Renaissance
The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke - Jeffrey C. Stewart

Though regarded as the "dean" of the Harlem Renaissance, Alain LeRoy Locke's name is not one that usually comes to mind when most people think of the movement. Yet it was the Philadelphia-born philosopher who provided much of the intellectual framework for it, most notably with his concept of the "New Negro." That Jeffrey Stewart uses the name as the title for his in-depth biography of Locke both highlights its role in defining Locke's legacy and the degree to which it was a product of Locke's own life and experiences.

 

The only child of middle-class parents, Locke grew up in Gilded Age Philadelphia. Stewart stresses the predominant role Locke's mother Mary played in his life, particularly in inculcating a passion for education. Graduating from Harvard, Locke became a celebrity among African Americans by becoming the nation's first black Rhodes scholar, though he was frustrated in his efforts to complete his degree there. Returning to America, he started teaching at Howard University, moving from education to philosophy after earning his doctorate at Harvard. Yet it was his work on race that would endure, particularly with his promotion of African and African-American culture in both art and literature. Though the Renaissance as a movement declined by the end of the 1920s, Locke had succeeded in redefining African American identity in ways that embraced their heritage while reaffirming its place in American life.

 

Locke's role in this has long deserved its due, and Stewart has provided it. His biography provides readers with a deeply perceptive study of Locke's life and achievements, one that situates them both within his time and the circumstances of his life. His is especially good at describing the central role Locke's homosexuality played in his life, which is no small achievement considering the degree to which such matters often went unspoken back then. That doing so requires a degree of supposition on Stewart's part is understandable, but his judgments are reasoned and well-argued. Together it makes for a masterful achievement, one that gives Locke the recognition he deserves for his many achievements.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?