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Search tags: Ursula-K-Le-Guin
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text 2020-05-28 11:28
Reading progress update: I've read 633 out of 997 pages.
The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition - Ursula K. Le Guin,Charles Vess

We learn how the school of wizardry was founded on Roke.

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text 2020-05-09 17:35
Reading progress update: I've read 326 out of 997 pages.
The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition - Ursula K. Le Guin,Charles Vess

Now it's just two men in a boat (or one man and an adolescent), a Prince and a wizard. The madman's gone overboard.

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text 2020-05-09 03:57
Reading progress update: I've read 320 out of 997 pages.
The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition - Ursula K. Le Guin,Charles Vess

Three men in a boat! (Or at least, two men and an adolescent.) Or, one prince, one wizard and one madman in a boat.

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review 2020-05-07 02:09
Dream logic and existentialism
The Lathe of Heaven - Ursula K. Le Guin

This certainly made up for "City of Illusions". I admit that the end lost me, but then again, dreams are not supposed to make sense all the way.

 

There is a persistent feeling of urgency about this story. Haber's conceit and grandiosity is apparent soon enough, and the more the book advances, the more anxiety how beholden to Haber Orr is it caused me. It almost tips into impatience about how passive Orr is.

 

And that might be part of how genius the book is. Because for all intents and purposes, Orr is a god. THE god and creator of the world inside those pages. And the story itself shows us what Orr himself puts in words: that an unbalanced god that is not part of his own world and tries to meddle with prejudice ultimately destroys everything.

 

There is much more. A recursiveness that gets reeeeally tangled and confusing at the end. Either a god that dreams himself and more gods into existence (a little help from my friends), or maybe that other dreamers already existed, and even, maybe, that the dreamer was not the one we thought (specially from halfway in). The way we keep coming back to the importance of human connection (the one thing Haber maybe had right, even if he denied it in his own dealings), the fact that "the end justifies the means" implies that there is and end, as if history, or mankind, or the world wouldn't then march on, and as that is not truth, then there are only means.

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text 2020-05-05 17:15
Snakes and Ladders Track Post
Our Mutual Friend - Charles Dickens,Richard Gaughan
Red Mars - Kim Stanley Robinson
The Lathe of Heaven - Ursula K. Le Guin

 

1. Author is a woman: Dragonflight by Anne McCaffrey 04/01 Review

6. Title has a color word in it: Purple Hibiscus by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie 04/04 Review

 

27. Set during WWI or WWII: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer  10/04  Review     

38. Newest release by a favorite author: Golden in Death by J.D. Robb  11/04 Review

41. Characters involved in politics: Yeah, no. Read Vendetta in Death by J.D. Robb 14/04 Review and roll 1 die.

47. Snake - go back to 19

 

19. Set in the UK: The Bloody Chamber: And Other Stories by Angela Carter 18/04 Review

28. Written between 1900 and 1999: The Grand Sophy by Georgette Heyer 23/04 Review

36. Set in Central or South America: Too scattered for Amado, I read a short Bodoc for children and call it. Review

37. Has won an award: Started Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie  05/01 Review

45. A book that has been on your tbr for more than one year: I counted so wrong before, but I was listening The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula K. Le Guin  while cleaning and cooking this weekend and still works. Will post review in a bit. Meanwhile

54. Is more than 400 pages long: Huh... well... I've got Our Mutual Friend by Charles Dickens on the dock. And Red Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson. Either ought to go over that...

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