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text 2018-09-13 17:51
Reading progress update: I've read 60 out of 385 pages.
Slasher Girls & Monster Boys - Jay Kristoff,Carrie Ryan,McCormick Templeton,Stefan Bachmann,Cat Winters,April Genevieve Tucholke,A.G. Howard,Megan Shepherd,Leigh Bardugo,Kendare Blake,Marie Lu,Nova Ren Suma,Kami Garcia

 

I've enjoyed the first two stories!

 

Maybe I could even read this after dark--we'll see.

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review 2018-09-10 05:49
My Mouth is a Volcano
My Mouth Is a Volcano Activity and Idea Book - Julia Cook,Carrie Hartman

"All of Louis thoughts are very important to him. In fact, his thoughts are so important to him that when he has something to say, his words begin to wiggle, and then they do the jiggle, then his tongue pushes all of his important words up against his teeth and he erupts, or interrupts others. His mouth is a volcano!" This book can be used in the classroom to introduce classroom rules, expectations and routines. It can lead to a discussion on what should be appropriate to ask the teacher and what the student should ask a peer. The book is a great engaging materials that allow students to learn how to follow procedures.

 

Fiction

PreK-3

Level J

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review 2018-09-09 22:47
My Mouth Is a Volcano Activity and Idea Book - Julia Cook,Carrie Hartman

 

Brief Review:

My mouth is a volcano is about a young boy who has issues with his mouth being a volcano and saying what was on his mind. When it was his turn to present things about himself as a star student, he was interrupted by his classmates and was upset about being interrupted. His mom explained to him that, that’s how everyone felt when he did that himself.

Idea of how it can be used in a classroom:

My mouth is a volcano could be used to explain when good times to talk are and when it is not okay to talk. The teacher could have the students write about a time where their own mouth was a volcano and how did they fix the problem with their mouths being a volcano.

Reading Level & Leveling System:

Accelerated Reader

3.8; Third Grade Eight Months

Book Rating:

I would rate this book a 5 because it shows what the young boy was doing and how it was irritating the other students. And when it happened to him he didn’t like what the other students were doing it, And realized the other students feel the same way when he does it and learns a strategy of how to fix his volcano.

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review 2018-08-10 10:51
Big character
The Princess Diarist - Carrie Fisher

I laughed, and I grimaced, and I ran a gamut of other emotions, from surprise, to disbelief, to pain and sympathy.

 

I started to follow a print while listening because at first I did not always catch what Fisher was saying. There was much pausing, and after a while I kept doing it because there are minute differences here and there.

 

This is a very interesting lady. What astounded me the most is her capacity to write her 19-year-old self, with all the embarrassment and self-doubt. It's powerful enough to make you uncomfortable by proxy.

 

Back then I was always looking ahead to who I wanted to be versus who I didn’t realize I already was, and the wished-for me was most likely based on who other people seemed to be and the desire to have the same effect on others that they had had on me.

 

She writes an almost nude picture of herself, the good, the bad, the WTF (and there were many, many instances where I went WTF), the petty, the shy, the self-aware, the painfully young. There is this sense of "I'm at the last part of the slide, and I have little fucks left to give" mixed with the "still want to be liked".

 

There is a lot about her relationship with the character, a lot mixed feelings that in the end, amount to mostly positive.

 

“You were my first crush.” I heard it so much I started asking who their second one was. We know what a first crush is to a teenager, but what does it mean to a five-year-old?
“But I thought you were mine! That I had found you—I was the only one who knew how beautiful you were—because you weren’t beautiful in that usual way women in film are, right?”
He realizes that I might take what he’s saying wrong. He doesn’t mean it that way. I reassure him, touch his arm; why not give him an anecdote? “I know what you mean, it’s fine. Go on.”
He checks my face to see if I mean it. I do. He continues, “So my friend, when I tell him about my crush, he goes, ‘Oh yeah, she’s awesome! I have a total crush on her, too. Everyone does.’ I got upset. I coulda punched him.”
“Why?”
“Because you were mine and I wanted to be the one who loved you. Me, maybe even help you . . .” He got embarrassed. “Anyway—I wanted to tell you.” He shrugs, then adds, “Thanks for my childhood,” and walks off. Wow, what a thing to be given credit for, to be thanked for! Because he didn’t mean his whole childhood—he meant the good bits. The parts he escaped to.

 

It was a weird and nostalgic ride.

 

If you can find a common language that runs from five to eighty-five, you’ve got yourself something, and Star Wars fans have something.

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text 2018-08-03 17:18
The Princess Diarist by Carrie Fisher $1.99!
The Princess Diarist - Carrie Fisher

When Carrie Fisher recently discovered the journals she kept during the filming of the first Star Wars movie, she was astonished to see what they had preserved—plaintive love poems, unbridled musings with youthful naiveté, and a vulnerability that she barely recognized. Today, her fame as an author, actress, and pop-culture icon is indisputable, but in 1977, Carrie Fisher was just a teenager with an all-consuming crush on her costar, Harrison Ford. 

With these excerpts from her handwritten notebooks, The Princess Diarist is Fisher’s intimate and revealing recollection of what happened on one of the most famous film sets of all time—and what developed behind the scenes. Fisher also ponders the joys and insanity of celebrity, and the absurdity of a life spawned by Hollywood royalty, only to be surpassed by her own outer-space royalty. Laugh-out-loud hilarious and endlessly quotable, The Princess Diarist brims with the candor and introspection of a diary while offering shrewd insight into the type of stardom that few will ever experience.

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