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review 2017-11-06 17:46
Dragonfly Song - Wendy Orr

This was kind of a hard book to review, mostly because it almost falls between genres. It's classed as an upper Middle-Grade historical fantasy, which, that's not wrong . . .

 

I felt like it had more of a classic children's fiction feel to it. It's coming-of-age, and also a sort of epic hero's journey, straddling children's lit and YA in a way that's often done more by adult literary works. It touches on many 'big ideas': deformity, religion/society, acceptance, adoption, trauma, bullying, disability, purpose/identity, fate . . . The format is creative and unique. The story arc stretches from the MC's birth to age 14 and is told in omniscient third person varying with passages in verse.

 

I'm not sure if there was a meaning to the alternating styles; at some points, I thought the dreamlike verse passages were meant to show the MC's perspective in a closer, almost experiential or sensory format as an infant, a toddler, a mute child . . . but then that didn't necessarily carry through, so perhaps it was more to craft an atmosphere for the story.

 

The setting is the ancient Mediterranean, and the story picks up on legends of bull dancing. The world feels distinct, grounded and natural, without heavy-handed world-building. It's a world of gods and priestesses, sacrifice and death and surrender. Humans seem very small within it, and as a children's book, it's challenging rather than comforting. There's death and violence and loss, handled in a very matter-of-fact manner, so I'd recommend it for maybe ages 10+, depending on the child. It's not gratuitously violent or graphic, but it's a raw-edged ancient world where killing a deformed child, having pets eaten by wild animals, beating slaves - including children - and sacrificing people as well as animals to the gods is just part of life. 

 

I was very kindly sent a hardcover edition via the Goodreads Giveaways program, and the book production is lovely. It has a bold, graphic cover with some nice foil accents, a printed board cover (which I prefer for kids books due to the durability), fully illustrated internal section pages, and pleasant, spacious typesetting.

 

Confident, mature young readers will find this an engaging, challenging and meaningful read with an inspiring story arc and some lovely writing. Hesitant readers and very young readers will probably find it a struggle. I'd give it 5/5 as a product, 4/5 as a literary work and 3/5 as kid's entertainment.

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review 2017-01-27 20:29
Other Gods (The Averillan Chronicles 1)
Other Gods - Barbara Reichmuth Geisler

Shaftesbury, England, 1141

 

It didn't seem so terribly evil, what she was doing. The bones were, after all, only bones. She remembered how Galiena had explained it to her in that maddening, superior sort of way, as if she didn't know anything at all. 'My dear,' Galiena had said, making it sound as if she was saying "you slut", 'he is dead. Died long ago. So this will be no harm to him. He is with God. Isn't that what you believe?' And the long, ovate, down-slanted eyes had glinted, reminding her of a snake. 'And if he is with God, he can have no need for his bones.' […]

 

The words echoing hollowly across her memory, she tiptoed to the shrine and, with surprising audacity, reached out and touched the box. There was no resistance. She put her hand to the latch and, with no more than a slight clicking, released it and lifted the lid. This was ridiculously easy. She peered into the gilded depths and saw the bones there, neatly arranged, not as if he had died, not as if he was in a coffin, but fumbled all together to fit. 'Surely it is not customary to open the reliquary to see if he is in there. No one,' – that had been Galiena's final, convincing argument – 'No one will look for the bones. Why would they? And therefore they will not know that they are missing.'

 

Another highly observant and rational nun solving mysteries in and around a medieval abbey. Surely we have enough of these series now? But Other Gods is well written, and it is different from most. For a start it is closer to Ellis Peters' Cadfael novels, and intended to be so – the same date, with England suffering under the warring Matilda and Stephen, and also the place, Shaftesbury, so similar to Shrewsbury, home of Brother Cadfael – but also closer in attitude and atmosphere: Dame Averilla, the infirmaress and herbalist, faces the same kind of internal problems that Cadfael always faces, for instance a formal and uncharitable sub-prioress, and a distant, aristocratic, abbess who seems totally out of touch.

 

Then a valuable book disappears – and so does one of the nuns, Dame Agnes, who is believed by many of the nuns to be possessed and whom Dame Joan, the sub-prioress, insists should be exorcised, although Dame Averilla believes her to be simply ill. But when this ill, or possessed, nun disappears into the Forest, who is to find her, who is to bring he back? Under Dame Joan's influence, the Abbess forbids Averilla to go in search of her. And Averilla of course is under a vow of obedience.

 

In fact Dame Agnes is found by Galiena, the local wise woman (witch, many believe) and her followers.

 

This Galiena, born into an aristocratic family but now come down in the world, is a fascinating character. When she was ten, her elder brother returned from the Crusades and introduced her to the art of healing as practised by the foreign healers in the Holy Land. Spurred on by this, she learnt all she could from the local wise woman. Then at the age of thirteen, and already stunningly beautiful, she was married off to a fat pig of a man older than her father, who soon took to beating her unmercifully. A few years later, "he died in dreadful agony", poisoned by her, and she was free to go her own way and practise her arts as a wise woman herself.

 

Unfortunately, and perhaps because she had already used those arts to bring about more than one death, the path she chooses to follow is the path of evil.

 

Now only Dame Averilla can stop Galiena and save Dame Agnes, but that is being made as dificult as possible for her by her superiors in the nunnery. Why?

 

A first novel in what seems to have set out to be a series that would appeal to Ellis Peters fans, Other Gods is set in exactly that same time-frame and we imagine Brother Cadfael busy in in the infirmary at his monastery in Shrewsbury; we even begin to wonder whether he and Dame Averilla ever met!

 

There is a Book 2 (Graven Images) and a prequel (In Vain) but they were published ten years or more ago - my copy of Other Gods is a second-hand paperback I picked up by chance - and though I should like to read more I don't think I will: even the Kindle editions cost far more than I'm usually prepared to pay for a new paperback. Another unlucky author with a couldn't-care-less publisher.

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review 2015-04-12 05:27
Human Sacrifice (Book One) - M. Elaine Moore

“Human Sacrifice” by M. Elaine Moore starts on a grim note when L.A.P.D. detective Aubri Payton’s work partner of several years dies in action. Worse, she can’t stand his replacement but is forced to work with him while dealing with her grief.

The characters are set up instantly with viewpoints that allow the reader more insights. Their relationship develops gradually, providing much more depth than most cop dramas do. The chemistry between them develops on a believable pace and was one of the best parts of this book. They are well chosen protagonists.

The plot takes the pair into danger and forces them to extreme action and choices. Great suspense and some explicit scene may make this unsuitable for the faint-hearted readers but a gripping read for the rest of us. Well done. 

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review 2015-04-07 19:17
The Bone-Pedlar
The Bone-Pedlar - Sylvian Hamilton

The first of the Richard Straccan books.

 

England, 1209

 

The story opens with what must be one of the best opening lines ever: "In the crypt of the Abbey Church at Hallowdene, the monks were boiling their Bishop," and is set in the period known as the Interdict, during the reign of bad King John, when (the King having fallen out with the Pope) the whole of England was placed under interdict and no religious ceremony of any kind was permitted to take place.

 

It is as though we are there:

 

We see the poverty of the priests (they can perform no ceremonies, no marriages, nothing – not even funerals: the dead are piling up!), and the desperation of the monks and nuns – unless, that is, they happen to possess an important relic, in which case of course pilgrims come to the abbey to see, pray at, kiss, the sacred object, and pay for the privilege. And the monks will do anything to obtain such a relic.

 

We meet a spy who dresses as a beggar, maggots, stench and all, mingles with the crowd in a crypt with a spring of holy water, is caught and thrown out - and becomes for a while one of Straccan's team; a wandering monk with nine "loonies" in tow, taking them on a lifelong pilgrimage from shrine to shrine; abjurers, forced to live between the high and low tide lines, desperately trying to get on board any vessel departing the country. What is an abjurer? She does not explain. She shows us glimpses (often wonderful cameo-scenes) of England at the time, but she does not lecture us.

 

In fact, Abjuration of the Realm was an oath taken to leave the land for ever. By taking this oath, one could avoid penalties such as mutilation or even death, though abjurers who did not have the means to travel abroad – Britain being an island – died on the wet sand between the tide-lines of starvation and exposure.

 

There are three very believable sorcerers. Two are evil, a depraved Scottish nobleman not above sacrificing children (he kidnaps Straccan's daughter), and his accomplice, an ancient desert Arab the nobleman had picked up on his travels. The third is a Templar, also with a background in the Middle East, whose knowledge of the magic arts has got him into trouble with his Order, but who uses it to oppose the two evil sorcerers.

 

There are two witches, both young, both beautiful, one good the other bad: (Straccan falls in love with the former, in lust – has he really been bespelled? –  with the latter). There is a saint in the making, a genuine saint. There is the King, parsimonious John, who turns out to be one of the most relaxed and amusing characters in the book.

 

And there is our hero himself, Sir Richard Straccan, ex-Crusader who now deals in relics – "authentic" relics, not the cheap fakes sold for coppers at every street corner. These relics, which are extremely valuable, are usually the body parts of saints. Such objects as a kneecap of St Peter, three hairs of St Edmund, and the Holy Foreskin are mentioned, as well as an ear – the ear of St Marcellinus:

 

'Can't find it. Haven't had an ear before, have we?' Peter turned over several small boxes, pouches, bundles. 'No. Oh, is this it?' He held up what looked like a withered blackened folded scrap of leather. 'I suppose it might be an ear.' Both men looked doubtfully at it. 'Who was Marcellinus, anyway?'

Straccan consulted his list. 'It says here, an early blessed martyr. Let's have a look.' He turned the darkened scrap over in his fingers, sniffed it, shrugged and handed it back. 'Keep it dry. It'll start to smell if the damp gets at it.'

 

One relic that keeps cropping up is the finger of St Thomas, which Straccan has been commissioned to obtain for a wealthy patron. Little does he know that the finger is needed to make up the sum of eleven relics (of the eleven good disciples of Jesus) that the Scottish sorcerer will need to protect himself when he sacrifices Straccan's daughter in his attempt to call a devil from Hell.

 

Five stars, because a lot of the book is just as good as that opening line, and what isn't is as good as anyone else's opening lines.  

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review 2015-03-24 00:00
The Threat of Human Sacrifice
The Threat of Human Sacrifice - vampireisthenewblack I’m really starting to enjoy these mpreg Stereks.
I normally dislike books with children and/or pregnancy. But because it is Stiles and therefore protective Derek, I love it!

This is not fluff. Stiles and Derek are in constant fear. Because Stiles can never survive the labor (I’m still not sure why a c-section wouldn’t have worked). Their only chance is to give the child up to the sidhe so that the sidhe can work their magic and save Stiles’ life.

Very enjoyable mpreg Sterek. With lots of smexy times. Yep! Need Sterek nookie? Read this.

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