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review 2020-05-07 14:53
The Lies That Bind
The Lies That Bind - Emily Griffin

I don't support racist authors. I am so annoyed I ever read her books. The first one I read, "Something Borrowed" was terrible and the next one wasn't much better. 

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review 2020-05-02 09:49
Secrets, Lies, and Superheroes by whiskygalore
Secrets, Lies, and Superheroes - whiskygalore

An excellent sequel to 'I Will Always Love You' starring Dean as the 'Red Hood' in his latest movie. Marvin Metatron is proving troublesome as a douchebag director. Dean is suffering (unacknowledged) PTSD since the events of book one.

"At least now he has Cas, his bodyguard turned boyfriend turned love of his fucking life by his side."

Source: archiveofourown.org/works/21355273
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review 2020-04-24 11:43
A spider web that traps readers and doesn’t let go
Odd Numbers - JJ Marsh

I write this review as a member of Rosie’s Book Review Team (authors, if you are looking for reviews, check here), and I freely chose to review an ARC copy of this novel.

JJ Marsh is an author I’ve read great reviews about and has been on my list for a while, so I took the chance when I saw an ARC for her next book had become available. I can’t compare it to the rest of her works, but based on this novel, which is a new genre for her, I wouldn’t hesitate recommending her books, and I look forward to catching up on some of her previous novels.

I think the description above provides plenty of hints as to the plot, and this is one of those novels where the way the story is told and the fine details are fundamental, so I’ll try to avoid over explaining things or giving too many hints (I want to avoid spoilers at all cost). This is a story built around six friends (three women and three men) who meet at university, while they are studying to become international translators, and grow to be quite close. They come from different countries (mostly Europe, although one comes from the US, and one is from Indian origin), have very different personalities and backgrounds, and it’s likely that their friendship would have fizzled and died if not for a tragic event that takes place while they are away celebrating New Year (and the new millennium) in December 1999. After that, they meet every two years, and the event that binds them together weighs heavily on them all, having a very different impact in each one of them. Things come to a head on the 20th anniversary of that fateful New Year’s celebration and readers are privileged witnesses of another night to remember. This novel reminded me of a book I read and reviewed recently, The Hunting Party, but also of films like The Celebration (Festen), where there is a build-up of tension, strained relationships, plenty of secrets and lies, and a surprise or two. Although I think many readers will smell a rat from early on in the novel, even if they get it right (and let’s say things are left open to interpretation), the beauty of this novel is in the way it is built, the variety of points of view, and the psychological insights it offers into a catalogue of characters that are not miles away from people most of us know. Considering this is the author’s first incursion into the psychological drama genre, I take my hat off to her.

There are a variety of themes that come up in the novel, some more important to the action than others, for instance the nature of friendship, the way different people experience grief, the guilt of the survivor, how we change and evolve over time and how our relationships change with us, love, death, careers, priorities, family, charity missions, and, of course, lies.

As for the characters, I won’t go into too much detail about them, because the author does a great job of building them up through the novel, and readers should discover them as they read. Marsh chooses one of the female characters, Gael, as the main narrator, and she starts the story ‘now’ (in 2020). The whole novel is written in the first person, but not all from the same point of view. Although I’ve said that Gael is the main narrator, and she has more chapters than the rest, we also get to hear the voices of the other characters, who take us back into some of the reunions the friends have had over the years, and that allows readers to compare and contrast Gael’s version of the rest of her friends with their own words and insights. Readers can compose a mental picture and fit in the pieces of the puzzle, making their own minds up and deciding if they agree or not with Gael’s perceptions. It also makes for a more rounded reading experience, as we get to know each character more intimately, and perhaps to empathise, if not sympathise, with all of them. I liked Gael from the start: she is articulate, a journalist, and a bit of a free spirit, but she always tries to understand and accommodate others as well, and she is more of the observer and the outsider in the story, for reasons that will become evident to the readers from early on. I particularly enjoyed the fact that the friends are like an ersatz family, with individual roles they always fall back on when they are together (the nurturing mother, the responsible and dependable father, the youngest and spoilt sister, the rushed and sporty brother, the sister whom everybody confides in [Gael]), and this reminded me of Eric Berne’s Games People Play. All the characters are articulate and savvy enough to be aware of this and play it for keeps as well.

The book flows well, and the language used is appropriate to each one of the individual characters, fitting with their personalities and quirks without calling too much attention to itself. It helps move the story along, and manages to build up the tension, even when there isn’t a lot of action in the usual sense. There are mysterious events taking place (some that will have readers wondering if the characters are imagining them or not), clues that sometimes don’t seem to amount to much, hints, and some memorable scenes. But all those elements are woven subtly into the narrative creating a spider web that traps the readers and the more they read, the more they become entangled in the strands of the story and the characters, until it becomes almost impossible to put the book down.

There is a closure of sorts, although the ending is ambiguous and most of the surprises and big reveals have come before then. I liked the fact that there is much left to the imagination of each reader, but I know such things are down to personal taste.

This is a great psychological drama, with engaging characters (some more likeable than others), fascinating relationship dynamics, and a mystery at its heart. It’s a gripping read, perfect to keep our minds engaged and to have us pondering the ins and outs of friendships, relationships, and which actions would push us beyond the limits of forgiveness. A gem.

The last 7% of the e-book contains the first-chapter of the author’s work-in-progress, in case you wonder about its length.  

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text 2020-04-15 13:01
Series Cover Reveal - Hush Note

 

 

 

The Hush Note Series --- Cover Reveal!

 

SURPRISE!!! 

 

Today we are dropping not one, not twobut THREE gorgeous covers on you!

 

Sarina Bowen, Devney Perry, and Rebecca Yarros have teamed up to bring you three stand-alone love stories this fall. While each book follows the band, they are all stand-alone stories that can be enjoyed all on their own.

 

 

**************************************

 

 

Coming September 22, 2020

 

Summer nights and star-crossed lovers! From USA Today bestselling author Sarina Bowen.

 

Once upon a time, he gave me a summer of friendship, followed by one perfect night. We shared a lot during our short time together. But he skipped a few crucial details.

I didn’t know he was a rock star.

I didn’t know his real name.

Neither of us knew I’d get pregnant.

And I sure never expected to see him again.

Five years later, his tour bus pulls up in Nest Lake, Maine. My little world is about to be shattered by loud music and the pounding of my own foolish heart.

 

Add to your Goodreads TBR → https://geni.us/LandLGoodreads

 

 

 

 

Cover Design by Okay Creations

 

 

Purchase Links

 

 

Amazon | Apple | Kobo | Nook |

 

 

SERIES PAGE

https://www.subscribepage.com/hushnote  

 

 

 

 

 Enter the #Giveaway and share! https://woorise.com/booklovers/c/20/2365

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review 2020-04-10 22:21
Derek (Grim Sinners Book 5) - LeAnn Ashers

 

 

This was a great addition to this ongoing series.We loved it from beginning to end of the story as I was action packed and intriguing and had a really great cast of characters.

We loved the chemistry Derek and Brittany had together they truly made a awesome couple and they were so hot together.We loved when a story draws you right in from the very first chapters and when this happens to us we are going to love it and we did that.We were on the seat of out pants the entire time !The old ladies were the bomb in this story this time around what bad*****!This story was filled with tons of drama and suspense and a whole lot of love.The story a time or two even made me laugh out loud.

This current story made it on to a favorites list.This story was a long time coming considering this couple played a cat a mouse game for and entire year .

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