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review 2017-09-23 22:30
A Disney Treasure Trove About Lost Cartoons
Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for ... Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Disney Cartoons (Disney Editions Deluxe (Film)) - David A. Bossert

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Disney Cartoons presents a history of the origins of the Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio and the hit they had in 1927 with Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, whose history has, surprisingly, been 'lost' until now.

 

Basically, if it weren't for Oswald, Disney may not have evolved to become the powerhouse it is today - but that journey was anything but linear. It involved Oswald's initial rejection, his eventual acceptance, and how Disney lost the contract to their first major character; only regaining the twenty-six Walt Disney created Oswald cartoons (and returning Oswald to his proper place in Disney history) six decades later.

Oswald's happy-go-lucky demeanor and his clever ability to come out on top of any situation predated Mickey's evolution and reflected creator Walt Disney's approach to life itself.

So how did Walt's first major animated success result not only in losing the contract, but in Oswald's journey into animation obscurity for so many years? Disney fans will quickly come to realize this story isn't just about Oswald's evolutionary process, but about Walt Disney's own evolution as he furthered his animation efforts and created the foundations of what was to become his more famous Mickey Mouse character.

 

From legends and realities to common animation practices of the day and how cartoons are 'lost' over time, Oswald the Lucky Rabbit packs in visual embellishments, from animation frames to vintage photos, in its efforts to trace Oswald's history through copyright synopsis, surviving film documents, and episode reviews.

 

Packed with illustration as it is, readers almost don't need the rare vintage Oswald film in order to enjoy this recreation of historical record that offers such in-depth discussion about Oswald's adventures and evolution.

 

Recommended for Disney fans, prior Oswald enthusiasts, and animation history readers alike, Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Disney Cartoons fills in many blanks and offers specifics about animation processes, legalese, and the process of researching and recapturing lost cartoons, and is a 'must' for any collection strong in Disney characters and history.

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review 2017-09-23 19:49
The Lost Child of Lychford by Paul Cornell
The Lost Child of Lychford (Witches of Lychford) - Paul Cornell

Series: Lychford #2

 

I debated between 3.5 and 4 stars for this one, but the weird opening with ranting about Greg Lake Christmas songs was just confusing because I'd never heard of him before. That aside, I had a lot more fun with this installment of the Lychford series.

 

It kicks off with Lizzie the vicar being haunted by a little boy in her church. It turns out that the boy isn't dead though, so the ghost is a weird kind of magical apparition that I'd have to explain using spoilers.

He's basically an echo of an event that takes place in the future when these weird extra dimensional beings for whom time isn't a thing try to break down the barriers of Lychford by sacrificing the child in a ritual.

(spoiler show)

 

Eventually the ghost decides (or gains enough energy) to not just haunt Lizzie in the church but follow her around, and the three witches start trying to figure out what he is exactly and what is going on with him, but then outside influences start messing with the witches' heads and things get a little crazy. The scenes where Lizzie, partially under their influence, tries to break out of it by damaging her hands are both disturbing and funny.

 

We also get to see more of the haunting in Judith's home and the other witches finally find out she's been cursed with the ghost of her dead husband, so I think I'm safe in counting this for "Haunted Houses" for the Halloween Bingo, even if the haunting with the little boy is a non-traditional haunting. This book could also count for the "In the dark, dark woods", the "Witches", the "Supernatural", and the "Ghost" squares. I'm not sure if it could count for "Chilling Children" because although the ghost of the little boy gets significant page time, he doesn't say much and I don't know if he'd count as a main character. He is in danger though.

 

Anyway, I'm looking forward to the next Lychford installment since they seem to be getting better as they go along.

Previous update:

26 of 133 pages

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text 2017-09-23 15:23
Reading progress update: I've read 26 out of 133 pages.
The Lost Child of Lychford (Witches of Lychford) - Paul Cornell

I was going to try to read this for the "Haunted Houses" square in the hopes that it would elaborate on Judith's situation at home (it sounds like it would fit a haunting). This novella kicks off with the ghost of a small boy (or some kind of manifestation anyway) appearing to Lizzie (the vicar) in her church, so this is promising.

 

Here's hoping there's more haunted church stuff!

 

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review 2017-09-22 19:44
Missing the humor
Transformers: Lost Light #9 - James Roberts,Priscilla Tramontano

And the real problem is that as serious, and mind-bending, and tragic, and thoughtful as this book gets, the humor is really what ties this all together.   It's not that Roberts can't wring a gut-wrenching story that I lapped up without the humor - but because I've seen how he handles it with humor, I know there's something missing. 

 

The real problem for me is within all this tension?   The humor broke it up.   And there just wasn't as much, and it wasn't laugh-out-loud funny for me, and I kinda ached for that. 

 

Still, the whole issue of selling grief is compelling, especially when the reality is shown to be different than the concept: it's eerie to know that even though we knew it was going to happen, we didn't know what it would look like in the end.   Then again, neither did anyone in the book. 

 

I'm sure this will be a continuing theme - and I want to see how it plays out.   Soon, I'm sure.   Soon.

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review 2017-09-21 05:49
Weaker than predecessors
Just After Sunset: Stories - Stephen King

A weaker read for me than his other short-story collections on the whole. N. is spectacular, though.

 

Willa: OK, sentimental ghost story

The Gingerbread Girl: Good thriller

Harvey's Dream: Now we are talking. For extra kick, which one?

Rest Stop: Awesomesauce!

Stationary Bike: If not writing, then images. And addictions. I love how he has his "go to" obsessive mind-itches that he always comes back to write about.

The things they left behind: I liked bits and pieces *shrug* I tend to avoid lit on the topic

Graduation Afternoon: Vignette building for that last snapshot. Meh

N. : This one was freaky scary. Likely because we all are little OCD. Best one in the book.

The Cat from Hell: Liked this one, and that gruesome end!

The New York Times at special bargain rates: Liked the idea. Sweet and sad.

Mute: I found this one funny in a bewildering way.

Ayana: People passing it on. A lovely concept. 

A very tight place: It was good. And gross (so very gross). And good.

 

 

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