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text 2018-12-01 09:00
November 2018 Reading Wrap Up
Citizen: An American Lyric - Claudia Rankine
Feminasty: The Complicated Woman's Guide to Surviving the Patriarchy Without Drinking Herself to Death - Erin Gibson
Princess Elizabeth's Spy - Susan Elia MacNeal
A Moveable Feast - Ernest Hemingway
The End of Epidemics: The Looming Threat to Humanity and How to Stop It - Bronwyn Fryer,Jonathan D. Quick
Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America - Michael Eric Dyson
Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis - J.E. Vance
Amelia: An Autumn Bride - Hildie McQueen
Love's Unfading Light: Historical Christian Romance (Eagle Harbor Book 1) - Melissa Jagears,Naomi Rawlings,Roseanna White

24 Festive Task challenge have goosed up my reading this month, plus the English winter weather has set in (darkness at 4:30pm kills any desire for going outside). 

 

Read:

1. Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine 3.5 stars

2. Feminasty by Erin Gibson 4 stars

3. Princess Elizabeth's Spy (Maggie Hope #2) by Susan Ella MacNeal 4 stars

4. A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway 3.5 stars

5. The End of Epidemics by Jonathan D. Quick, MD 3.5 stars

6. Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America by Michael Eric Dyson 5 stars

7. Hillbilly Elegy by JD Vance 3.5 stars

8. Amelia: An Autumn Bride (Brides for All Seasons #7) by Hildie McQueen 3 stars

9. Love's Unfading Light (Eagle Harbor #1) by Naomi Rawlings 2.5 stars

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review 2018-11-23 20:03
Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine
Citizen: An American Lyric - Claudia Rankine

This has been on my to read wish list for a while. I was doing a volunteer shift at the library, shelf reading from the 800s to the end. I found this shoved in, almost hidden by other volumes. I rescued it and took it home. 

 

A slim volume of poetry that says a lot, sometimes saying it in too esoteric/poetic writing that lost me. However, the author would then describe events that explained the more esoteric parts. Towards the last part of the book I felt the poetry didn't work for me on paper and that it was more suited to spoken word to feel the full effects. A sobering account of just how much microaggressions one person goes through in a day and how microaggressions can snowball into big altercations. 

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text 2018-11-02 08:00
Friday Reads - November 2, 2018
Feminasty: The Complicated Woman's Guide to Surviving the Patriarchy Without Drinking Herself to Death - Erin Gibson
Citizen: An American Lyric - Claudia Rankine
Let the Circle Be Unbroken ( logan 2) - Mildred D. Taylor

And so begins No School November, a loving name the parents of the students who go to DoDEA schools (American schools on base run by the DoD). Between the holidays, the parent-teacher conferences, the mandatory teacher training the kids are out of school more than they attend. Today is the first of those days off, so I am making my kids get their annual flu shot (mandatory to attend DoDEA schools) so they don't get too comfy being at home.

 

This weekend we are attending our town's Bonfire Night. I can't wait but right now all my hopes are on it NOT raining on our party. Old man winter has definitely arrived and set up shop here in East Anglia. Then on Monday starts my town's Remembrance Day activities - each day will have something going on (poetry session at Tilly's Tea Room and Shop, Darren Norton giving a monologue at the Heritage Center for example). I am hoping to make it to a couple of these events.

 

In between refereeing my kids and going to Great War events, I plan to read:

1. Feminasty by Erin Gibson (library borrow)

2. Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine (library borrow)

3. Let the Circle Be Unbroken (Logans #5) by Mildred D. Taylor (24 Festive Tasks)

 

Have a happy reading weekend!

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review 2018-04-09 18:31
Starting National Poetry Month with a bang
Citizen: An American Lyric - Claudia Rankine

I'm cognizant of the fact that I don't read enough books by women of color and that I read very few works of poetry. I decided to kill two birds with one stone by reading Claudia Rankine's Citizen: An American Lyric. (Also, it's National Poetry Month so it was a no-brainer.) This book is especially relevant right now with the state of our world being what it is: a shambles. Citizen is essentially Claudia's exploration of what it is to be a black woman living in America as told through poetic verse. It is beautiful, tender, terrible, tragic, and real. She doesn't shy away from such topics as police brutality or the prevalence of feeling like an outsider. This book is a personal revelation and a public admonishment all rolled into one neat package Coupled with her verses are historical quotes and pencil drawn (I think?) artwork. What better way to begin your foray into poetry than by reading a book that challenges the status quo and speaks from the heart? If you'd like to maybe see the world through a different set of eyes Citizen is your golden ticket with many stops along the way. 9/10

 

I made a note of this quote on page 89 to give you an idea of just how powerful her words are:

 

Those years of and before me and my brothers, the years of passage, plantation, migration, of Jim Crow segregation, of poverty, inner cities, profiling, of one in three, two jobs, boy, hey boy, each a felony, accumulate into the hours inside our lives where we are all caught hanging, the rope inside us, the tree inside us, its roots our limbs, a throat sliced through and where we open our mouth to speak, blossoms, o blossoms, no place coming out, brother, dear brother, that kind of blue.

 

What's Up Next: From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death by Caitlin Doughty

 

What I'm Currently Reading: The American Way of Death Revisited by Jessica Mitford

 

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2017-09-24 07:23
Ode to momentous summers
Dandelion Wine - Ray Bradbury

*pleased sigh* So gorgeous.

 

Dandelion Wine is a beautiful, whimsical love letter to those memories of summer that are so vivid, so powerful, we can feel the baking sun, the weight and smell of the air, the joy and lassitude when we recall them.

 

It goes from one episode to the next fluidly and with little warning, connecting and weaving them. Add in Bradbury's style and the result is a bit like dreams, a bit like memories, introspective, nostalgic and at points philosophical.

 

There were episodes to pull every shade of emotion, and I loved so many of them I'd have serious trouble picking a favorite. Grandma's cooking made me so hungry and also miss my grandfather very much. Colonel's Freeleigh's bits and John's departure made me tear a bit. I laughed out loud with the witch debacle. Lavinia's had me switch between cheering on and wanting to thump her, and scared me quite a bit. And the lime-vanilla ice-cream one! So many tangled feels!

 

It was an excellent read to savor, and one I'll revisit.

 

 

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