logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Coming-of-Age
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-20 19:12
*pleased sigh*
The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate - Jacqueline Kelly

How could I have neglected this book so long! I have found me a new all time favourite. You have no idea how lucky you are that most of the time I was too entertained to post. I have saved quotes at the rate of one-a-chapter, and I was trying to be conservative.

 

I read, and I kept researching things mentioned, from taxonomy to music or history, and having a blast through-out. I couldn't stop laughing, even during the turkey debacle (there was something inherently funny in that tragedy of childhood).

 

“Why do you want a donkey?” said Harry.
“Because I don’t think people eat donkeys. Do they?”

 

The thought that I have to get my mom to read this poped continously too. Mom is a school librarian, and has a project going where she narrates to the kids in a bi-weekly basis. Lending is at an all-time hight since it started. They discuss a lot of what she reads them in a free way, and they come up with the most interesting questions and observations. They also end up researching a lot on their own, (or plain finish the book in a weekend) since there's no obligation *snickers*. Now imagine what this book could spawn. I pestered her on the phone the whole morning (whenever I surfaced from the pages, that is).

 

There are some narrow anachronisms in general, and I reckon there must be more in particular for the region, since the author apologises in the note at the end. But really? Like one can place every bit acuratedly on ones own timeline. And no child is that aware of herself and her place in the world (hell, most adults aren't that awere of themselves), but while many observations might be too clearly worded, they still ring true to some memories of childhood impressions. Children instincts are an uncanny thing.

 

So, is it imperfect? I really couldn't tell you, since after reading six glorious months on the life of this child, my only true complain is that I wanted more when I got to the end. More pages, more time with her, more of and for her future.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-20 18:25
BOY'S LIFE Review
Boy's Life - Robert R. McCammon

Why did I put this one off for so long? Why, why, why?

 

Brilliant. Simply brilliant. Certainly one of the finest novels about the magic of childhood that I've ever read — and probably the most realistic, at least based on my childhood experiences. Maybe it's because I, like the protagonist of this novel (and Robert McCammon himself), grew up in Alabama. Boy's Life is spot-on, and I felt like a child once more while untangling the mystery of the strange murder in Zephyr.

 

Not much I can say about this one, except it's just friggin' wonderful. I only wish it were longer. Thank you, Mr. McCammon, for reminding me that magic does exist.

 

“You know, I do believe in magic. I was born and raised in a magic time, in a magic town, among magicians. Oh, most everybody else didn’t realize we lived in that web of magic, connected by silver filaments of chance and circumstance. But I knew it all along. When I was twelve years old, the world was my magic lantern, and by its green spirit glow I saw the past, the present and into the future. You probably did too; you just don’t recall it. See, this is my opinion: we all start out knowing magic. We are born with whirlwinds, forest fires, and comets inside us. We are born able to sing to birds and read the clouds and see our destiny in grains of sand. But then we get the magic educated right out of our souls. We get it churched out, spanked out, washed out, and combed out. We get put on the straight and narrow and told to be responsible. Told to act our age. Told to grow up, for God’s sake. And you know why we were told that? Because the people doing the telling were afraid of our wildness and youth, and because the magic we knew made them ashamed and sad of what they’d allowed to wither in themselves."

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-18 21:34
A Book For All Ages – She’s Like A Rainbow by Eileen Colucci #EileenColucci
She's like a Rainbow - Eileen Colucci

She’s Like A Rainbow by Eileen Colucci is outside my comfort zone, but every now and then I need to shake myself up.

 

I have read so much murder and death, that they all began to run together and I needed a break. This ray of sunshine fit the bill.

She's like a Rainbow

Amazon  /  Goodreads

 

MY REVIEW

 

She’s Like A Rainbow by Eileen Colucci is an original and creative story that illustrates how we are more similar than different, with our own insecurities and problems dogging us. Teens and adults alike can learn a thing or two from Reema.

 

I had been looking for books outside my normal reading and when Eileen offered me a copy, I accepted. The cover was what first drew me in, but when I read the blurb I thought it would be a fun story.

 

The allusion to the legend of the White Buffalo fits Reema’s life. The baby starts out white and changes color when he gets older. Most of us are a collection of nationalities.

 

 Reema is a strong and determined young girl who refuses to give up on what she believes to be the truth. She shows love, patience and persistence as she seeks the answers to her questions.

 

All the childhood angst, plus…

 

The writing is wonderful and touches on many issues, such as being Muslim, and adoption.

 

I would highly recommend this story to people of all ages.

 

Animated Animals. Pictures, Images and Photos  4 Stars

 

READ MORE HERE

 

  • You can see my Giveaways HERE.
  • You can see my Reviews HERE.
  • animated smilies photo: animated animated.gifIf you like what you see, why don’t you follow me?
  • Thanks for visiting!
Source: www.fundinmental.com/a-book-for-all-ages-shes-like-a-rainbow-by-eileen-colucci-eileencolucci
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-14 15:03
Queen of Always (Stolen Empire Book 3) - Sherry D. Ficklin

♪♫My Pick For Book Theme Song♫♪

Leader of the Broken Hearts by Papa Roach  --Catherine is tasked with some difficult decisions that leave her not so lucky in love. Ultimately, she did it all for Russia…

And now I finally know what it feels like

To risk everything and still survive

When you’re standing on the battlefield

And all the pain is real

That’s when you realize

That you must’ve done something right

'Cause you’ve never felt so alive

*note:  all the lyric video's for this song were not quite the right one, but this one's at least visually engaging…but some of the lyrics are wrong.

 

Book Title:  Queen of Always

Author:  Sherry D Ficklin

Series:  Stolen Empire #3

Genre:  Older YA, Historical

Source:  Kindle eBook (Library)

 

Add to Goodreads

 

Overall Rating:  4.3/5 STARS (GRADE=A-)

 

My Thoughts

 

She's ruthless, because she has to be…she's loved because she's fair.  She's the queen because she took it.

A stunning conclusion to the Stolen Empire Series…a sometimes poignant, sometimes encouraging, with some serious OMG moments leading up to her stealing the crown from her asinine (and that word doesn't even cover it) husband, Peter.  For such a short book it really packs a punch.

 

⇝Sex Factor⇜ This is older ya for sure because of the graphic content and the sex.  Especially, one scene in particular…wow (maybe a little TMI).

 

Ratings Breakdown

 

Plot:  4/5

Main Characters:  4.3/5

Secondary Characters:  4.5/5

The Feels:  4.3/5

Addictiveness:  4.2/5

Theme or Tone:  4/5

Flow (Writing Style):  4.5/5

Backdrop (World Building):  4/5

Originality:  4/5

Book Cover:  5/5

Ending:  4/5  Cliffhanger:  No

 

Will I read more from this Author?  Yes, I would

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-10 18:55
Elizabeth by Ken Greenhall
Elizabeth: A Novel of the Unnatural - Jonathan Janz,Ken Greenhall,Jessica Hamilton

 

NEVER have I been so unsettled reading a book narrated by a 14 year old girl. But perhaps that is because Elizabeth is not your ordinary teenager. She's descended from a long line of witches and is now discovering the power within her. Or is she? You'll have to read this to find out!

 

The prose in this book is simply outstanding. It's chilling at times because the narrator seems to have no feelings whatsoever. She talks about sex, acts of violence, and eating breakfast all in the same tone. Sometimes I would need to read a sentence or paragraph over again to be sure that I read it correctly.

 

Then, there's the sex. It's not graphic at all, there are no mentions of sex organs or the mechanics of the act itself...it's just there. Perhaps that is why it never bothered me, as sex between a 14 year old girl and adults should. Then again, perhaps it is because Elizabeth herself never expresses any feeling about it, she only mentions it as a...tool, (please forgive the half-hearted pun), to get what she wants.

 

The entire time I was reading, I was wondering if Elizabeth, indeed, possessed supernatural powers. Was everything going on simply a matter of coincidence and her overactive imagination? Or were these things actually happening because of her actions? (In this regard, Elizabeth reminds me of one of my favorite books, THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR by Anne Rivers Siddons.) It was the masterful writing of Mr. Greenhall that had me turning this fact over and over again in my mind. I know what conclusion I came to, I'm interested in yours!

 

This novel reminds me of why I became a horror fan in the first place, it wasn't the gore or the blood, (though those DO have their place and I love them too), it's human nature and what people can be capable of, underneath their ordinary facades. These days we have tons of books and TV shows about sociopaths/psychopaths/personality disorders-all of which are trying to explain things to us. Mr. Greenhall wrote this back in the day, (the 1970's), before FBI profiling and Criminal Minds. Even without all of those studies and the psychiatric manuals, he had this criminal profile down PAT.

 

Is Elizabeth continuing on her family's tradition of witchcraft, or is she another type of animal altogether? I HIGHLY recommend you read this book, and then come talk to me. We'll discuss it together!

 

*Thank you to the most awesome Valancourt Books for the free review copy in exchange for my honest review. This is it!*

 

**Furthermore, thanks to Valancourt for bringing back these horror gems that may otherwise have been entirely forgotten. Bravo, guys! Bravo!**

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?